Back to University Catalog 2004-2005

Health Science              College of Health and Human Services                 Division of Health Sciences

Bachelor of Science

Community Health Option

Dignostice Imaging Option - BSHS Degree Track                     (Single Field Major)

Health Care Management Option

Prosthetics Option (Single Field Major)

Physician Assistant Option - California                                    Licensed Track (Single Field Major)

Radiologic Technology Option (Single Field Major)

Minor

Master of Science

Physician Assistant Residency Option

Professional Studies Option

 

Faculty

Gus McCarthy, Chair, Division of Health Sciences

WH  A-330E (310) 243-2217

 

Ellen Hope-Kearns, Coordinator, Professional Studies Option

WH A-330H, (310) 243-3364

Scott Hornbeak, Coordinator, Prosthetics Option

WH A-385C, (310) 243-2700

Pamela Krochalk, Coordinator, Community Health Option

WH A-330B, (310) 243-2690

Fung Sun,  Coordinator, Health Care Management Option

WH A-320E, (310) 243-3364

Erna Wells, Coordinator, Radiologic Technology Option

WH A-330J, (310) 243-3364

Paula D'Amorie, Margaret Parker, Vanessa Parker-Crockett, Sharon Raphael, Timothy Staats, Abel Arvizu Whittemore

Program Office:  WH A-330, (310) 243-3748

Student Services Center - Advising

WH A-300, (310) 243-2120 or (800) 344-5484

 

Emeriti Faculty

Chi-Hua Hsiung, Amer El-Ahraf

 

Program Description

Health Science offers a variety of programs including a major with different options leading to the Bachelor of Science in Health Science, a minor and a subject matter preparation program that partially fulfills the requirements for a Single Subject Teaching Credential in Health Science.

The Community Health Option is designed to provide students with the necessary interpersonal skills and perspectives to function as effective community health workers in an urban population that is diverse ethnically, economically and demographically.

A student in this option will acquire oral and written communication skills needed to develop health education materials and gain a basic understanding of public health problems and methods commonly used in studying these problems.  Registered Nurses and allied health care workers will be able to serve their patients more effectively by becoming knowledgeable about community health service agencies and public health policy at all levels of government.

Students majoring in this option also must complete the requirements for a minor.

The Health Care Management Option is designed to provide students with a general foundation in the principles and theories of management, the skills needed by frontline or middle level supervisors in a health care unit, an understanding of the organizational structure of the health care system, the financing of health care services in the United States, and knowledge of current health policies at local, state and federal levels. 

Students majoring in this option must complete requirements for a minor.

The Prosthetics Option educates students to evaluate patients who are in need of artificial limbs (prostheses) or mechanical body supports (orthoses).  Formal instruction in prosthetics will education students how to design appropriate prosthetic devices; to fit and fabricate the devices; and to provide follow-up care.  This practitioner level program is clinically affiliated with the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Long Beach, and is designed to produce professional level graduates.

Undergraduate students who plan to become prosthetists should choose this Option.  A student must have completed all of the required prerequisite courses before qualifying for admission to the Option; normally completing 56-70 lower division transferable units before admission.  The Option is a Single Field Major - no minor required.  Actual volunteer or working experience an orthotics and prosthetics facility is an additional selection criteria.  After successful application and admission to the Prosthetics Option, the student spends their first three semesters completing lower division requirements and Health Science division core requirements.  These courses include two new courses, HEA 205, "Introduction to Orthotics and Prosthetics," and HEA 231, "Clinical Protocol in Orthotics and Prosthetics."  During this period, the student will undergo additional evaluation for technical aptitude, and may be required to obtain more volunteer time in local facilities in order to prepare for the clinical courses.  The clinical portion of the program is twenty-four weeks in length, and will begin in August and January of every year.  The student accepted into the Prosthetics Option will take 31 units of upper division coursework, which includes a five week clinical rotation (Preceptorship) at the close of the formal courses.  Completion of the Prosthetics Option satisfies the total course requirements for the Bachelor's Degree in Health Science and also satisfies the educational requirements necessary to enter an accredited prosthetics residency.  The Health Science Degree, Prosthetics Option and the post graduate residency are accredited by the National Commission on Orthotic and Prosthetic Education (NCOPE).  Upon completion of the residency program, the student is eligible to take the prosthetics certification examination given by the American Board for Certification in Orthotics and Prosthetics.

 After the student has completed the BS Degree in Health Science, Prosthetics Option, they also have the opportunity to pursue Orthotic course work in an additional Orthotics Certification Program offered in the Division of Extended and International Education.  A separate application and supporting documents will be required for admission into this program after completion of the degree program.  A number of qualified students who have already completed a Bachelor's Degree will also be attending the orthotic clinical classes, paying the same fees to Extended Education.  These other students are known as Orthotic Certificate students; they receive a Certificate of Completion upon graduation from the orthotics program.

The Physician Assistant Option - An affiliation with Western University of Health Sciences' Primary Care Physician Assistant program is in place.  Western University now requires a bachelor's degree for those applying to the Master level PA program. The physician assistant faculty, chair and dean at Western University highly recommends that CSU Dominguez Hills applicants to their Masters level PA program obtain a Bachelor of Science degree in Health Science, Community Health option, from before applying to their PA program.  Admission to Western University of Health Sciences' Master PA program is on a competitive basis and is open to citizens and permanent residents of the United States.  For additional information about admission to the physician assistant program at Western University of Health Sciences, call (909) 623-6116.  For information about the B.S. in Health Science, Community Health option, CSUDH, call (800) 344-5484.

The Physician Assistant Option - California Licensed Track is
a degree completion program for physician assistants.  It is designed to provide the benefit of a broader understanding of the health care system, enabling graduates to provide direct patient service, in association with a physician, in a more knowledgeable manner.  
This track is for California licensed physician assistants or for graduates eligible to take the national certifying examination.

The Radiologic Technology Option is designed to accommodate the entering undergraduate or transfer student with an associate degree (AA or AS).  The program is offered in cooperation with the Harbor-UCLA Medical Center School of Radiologic Technology, which is currently accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education for Radiologic Technologists and approved by the State of California Department of Education for Radiologic Technology training.  Upon completion of the program, students will be qualified to sit for the certification examinations given by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists and the Certification Board of the California Department of Health Services.  Diagnostic Imaging - BSHS Degree Track applicants must be currently certified as radiologic technologists in California (C.R.T.) to be admitted to the degree completion track for radiologic technologists.

 

Features

The Health Care Management and Community Health Options are designed for currently practicing or potential health care personnel.  About half of the students are practicing registered nurses, respiratory therapists, and other health professionals.  Students may apply to one of the clinically related options:  the Physician Assistant Option; the Orthotics and Prosthetics Option; the Radiologic Technology Option.  Since nearly all of the students work during the day, most Health Science courses are offered in the late afternoon, evening or weekend and many meet only once a week.  To keep the Health Science programs contemporary, many of the Health Science courses are taught by practicing professionals.

 

Academic Advisement

All students are urged to consult with advisors throughout their matriculation at CSU Dominguez Hills.  At the very least, advisors should be consulted for the following:

o    Admission

o    Career plans and choices

o    Selection of options

o    Variation in programs and/or “course substitution”

o    Pre-registration advisement

o    Filing for graduation

Advisement is available through the College of Health and Human Services Student Services Center at 1-800-344-5484.

 

Preparation

Students interested in Health Care Management or Community Health may complete their lower division general education, preferably with an associate of science degree, before coming to
CSU Dominguez Hills. Those students who are interested in the clinically related options should have a strong science background in high school and should have completed most of the lower division prerequisite courses for the option before entering the Health Science program. For clinical options, some direct care experience is recommended.

 

Credit for Prior Health Education

If students have completed a clinical program for which they did not receive academic credit, they may be granted credit for that education.  Please consult the Health Science Office for details. 
The credits obtained for a clinical program may be applied as lower division elective credits toward the Bachelor of Science Degree in Health Science only.

 

Procedures and Admission Criteria

Only a limited number of students can be accommodated in the clinical options.   In addition to filing a completed application to the university, students must also complete the desired option application form to be considered for admission.  Admission to these clinical options is not automatically ensured by meeting academic requirements, nor does admission to CSU Dominguez Hills as a Health Science Major guarantee acceptance into individual programs.

 

Graduation with Honors in the Major

An undergraduate student may be a candidate for graduation with honors in Health Science provided s/he meet the following criteria:

1.   A minimum of 36 units in residence at CSU Dominguez Hills;

2.   A minimum grade point average of at least 3.5 in courses used to satisfy the upper division requirements in the major;

3.   Recommendation by the Health Science faculty.

Students who achieve honors in Health Science will have the information recorded on their transcripts and diplomas.

 

Prosthetics Option

Due to the limited laboratory space, only 16 students can be accommodated in the Prosthetics Option. Admission to the option, therefore, is not automatically ensured by meeting the University admission requirements, nor does admission to CSU Dominguez Hills as a Health Science Major guarantee acceptance to the program.  The admission criteria and application procedures for the option are discussed below.

To be eligible for consideration as a candidate in this option, an applicant must meet the following minimum requirements:

A.  Completion of all lower division required courses with a grade of “C” or better (as listed in the program description section) and the completion of two years lower division course work.

B.  Facility with hand tools and light duty power equipment.

C.  Successful completion of all Orthotic and Prosthetic option prerequisite courses as listed in the Major Requirements for the B.S. in Health Science, Orthotics and Prosthetics option with a grade of "C" or better.

D.  A program application and subsequent interview by a panel consisting of orthotics and prosthetics faulty.  Send completed O & P applications to:

          California State University, Dominguez Hills

          O & P Program

          Carson, CA 90747 

          (310) 243-2120 or (800) 344-5484

Completed applications to the University should be sent to:

Please note:  Deadlines are subject to change without notification.  Check with the Health Science Office for the deadlines of the current application cycle.

Physician Assistant Option - California Licensed Track

This track is for California licensed PA's who wish to earn a Bachelor of Science degree in Health Science. 

The Physician Assistant Option - California Licensed Track has the following admission requirements:

1.   Applicants must hold a current California license to practice as a physician assistant in California or be eligible for the national certifying examination;

2.   Applicants must meet all the requirements for admission to CSU Dominguez Hills;

3.   It is preferred that applicants have completed at least 56-70 lower division transferable units, including lower division General Education requirements and English and mathematics courses which make them exempt from taking the EPT (English Placement Test) and the ELM (Entry Level Mathematics Test);

4.   It is preferred that applicants have completed prerequisites under "California Licensed Track", or their equivalents.  These courses, or their equivalents, may be included in the 56-70 transferable units required for admission to the track.  A grade of "C" or better in each course is required;

It is expected that California licensed physician assistants will have learned most of the material contained in the physician assistant courses currently listed in the CSU Dominguez Hills' University Catalog during their basic physician assistant programs.  The goal of this California Licensed Physician Assistant track is for these students to demonstrate baccalaureate level competency in Physician Assistant issues, medical theories and physician assistant techniques by means of review, study and testing and professional issues courses.

Students must complete all other requirements of CSU Dominguez Hills before receiving a degree.

For further information call or write:

California State University, Dominguez Hills

Health Science Program, WH A-330                                 

1000 East Victoria Street

Carson, CA 90747

(310) 243-3819 or (310) 243-2213.

During the University filing period, applicants should send a completed application to the University, official copies of all transcripts, and a nonrefundable application fee to:

            Office of Admissions

            California State University, Dominguez Hills

            1000 East Victoria Street

            Carson, CA 90747

Applications for admission to the University may be obtained by writing to the Information Center, same address as above, or
by calling (310) 243-3696.  Mark "PA" at the top of your application.

Admission to the University does not imply admission to the Physician Assistant Option - California Licensed Track.

 

Radiologic Technology Option

To be eligible for consideration as a candidate in this option, an applicant must meet the following minimum requirements:

A.  Completion of all lower division required courses.  A grade of “C” or better in each course is required.  The completion of 56-70 units of lower division course work is highly recommended before application to the program.

B.  Applicants meeting the above requirements must be willing to be interviewed by Harbor-UCLA faculty and Health Science program faculty.

C.  Applicants must submit two separate applications, with supporting documents to Harbor-UCLA School of Radiologic Technology and to CSU Dominguez Hills.

D.  Applications and supporting documents to Harbor-UCLA School of Radiologic Technology must be received by April 1 of each year.  Applications received after April 1 will be considered for the next year.  Applications for admission to CSU Dominguez Hills may be obtained by writing or calling the Office of Admissions, with completed applications returned to:

            Office of Admissions

            California State University, Dominguez Hills

            1000 East Victoria Street

            Carson, CA   90747

            (310) 243-3645

Applications to the clinical program may be obtained by writing or calling the School of Radiologic Technology at Harbor-UCLA, with completed applications returned to:

            Los Angeles County Harbor-UCLA Medical Center

            School of Radiologic Technology

            Box 27

            1000 West Carson Street

            Torrance, CA 90509

            (310) 222-2825

 

Diagnostic Imaging - BSHS Degree Track

Applicants must be currently certified as radiologic technologists in California (C.R.T.) to be admitted to the degree completion track for radiologic technologists.

 

Bachelor of Science in Health Science Program
Learning Objectives and Faculty Assessment Strategies

Upon completion of the B.S. in Health Science, graduates of any option will be able to fulfill the following overall program objectives.

Objective 1:  Demonstrate integration of principles from basic skills, natural, behavioral and computer sciences with the health science core; apply resulting skills and knowledge to personal health, health education and health care practice.

Faculty Assessment Strategies:  Review transcripts for required prerequisite courses with grade of C or higher; faculty observation and input regarding writing, speaking, critical thinking and interpersonal skills; use of written and classroom assessment for health science content.

Objective 2:  Identify historical trends, issues and problems of U.S. health care delivery systems by applying Standards of Measure; propose solutions to health care delivery problems with social and financial implications.

Faculty Assessment Strategies:  Classroom discussions; oral reports; written term papers and essay examinations.

Objective 3:  Demonstrate ability to apply logic and rational thinking to inquiry in Health Science research; demonstrate relevance of health science data to decision making.

Faculty Assessment Strategies:  Written critique of a recent health science research article; oral responses to classroom discussions; written examinations; evaluation of original written research proposal in the health sciences.

Objective 4:  Analyze the nature, transmission and control of disease from a public health perspective and apply these principles to health care planning.

Faculty Assessment Strategies:  Responses to classroom discussions; student reports and responses to guest speakers; written examinations; term paper from current literature.

Objective 5:  Analyze and apply current concepts of the behavioral sciences to the health field, with specific application to ethnically and culturally diverse, urban populations, especially in relation to specific disease.

Faculty Assessment Strategies:  Student presented case studies; group role playing; written papers and examinations.

Objective 6:  Identify and synthesize key principles, theories and skills of interpersonal and group processes in health techniques of interviewing, small group dynamics, crisis intervention and interpersonal management skills in ethnically and culturally diverse urban settings.

Faculty Assessment Strategies:  Student observations and analyses of selected group's interventions; individual consultations with instructor; group observation paper; presentation of docudrama; written essay examination.

Objective 7:  Identify the underlying causes and pathologic processes of disease in organ systems of the human body; propose possible treatments and prognoses related to specified diagnoses.

Faculty Assessment Strategies:  Evaluation of oral reports of case studies, video tapes and other audio visual aids; class discussions; written papers and examinations with objectives.

Objective 8:  Demonstrate integration of current management concepts, issues and skills required in a health unit; apply concepts and skills to the areas of health care personnel, finance, equipment supplies and facilities' management, emphasizing interpersonal communication contacts and personnel problem solving techniques.

Faculty Assessment Strategies:  Responses to cases,  classroom discussions; group drama illustrating principles; written "thought paper"; written examinations.

Objective 9:  Develop and improve reading, writing, speaking critical thinking, analytical, interpersonal and content skills, as applied to the multiracial, multiethnic, urban and suburban populations served by health organizations.

Faculty Assessment Strategies:  In all courses, assess students' classroom discussions and oral reports; responses to audio-visual aids; written term papers; written and oral reports from volunteer community project coordinators; written examinations and practical examinations to answer the question:  Have students mastered the Objectives?

 

Bachelor of Science in Health Science

 

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree

See the "Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree" in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements.  A minimum of 40 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division. 

Elective Requirements

Completion of elective courses (beyond the requirements listed below) to reach a total of a minimum of 120 or a maximum of 132 units.

 

General Education Requirements (54-60 units)

See the "General Education" requirements in the University Catalog or the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education requirements and course offerings.

 

United States History, Constitution and American Ideals Requirement (6 units)

See the "United States History, Constitution, and American Ideals" requirements in the University Catalog.  Courses used to satisfy this requirement do not apply to General Education.

 

Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement

See the "Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement" in the University Catalog.

 

Minor Requirements

Students completing this major with the Community Health option or the Health Care Management option will need to complete a minor in another field.

 

Major Requirements  (45-79 units)

Students must select one of the options listed.  The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required of all candidates for this degree.

A Major in Health Science consists of lower division required courses, upper division core courses and lower and upper division courses in an option.  The upper division core courses are common to all Health Science Majors.  The lower division required courses and the lower and upper division option courses vary with the option chosen.   All Health Science majors, all options, must take the following core courses:

 

Common Core Requirements (27 units)

A.  Lower Division Required Courses  (12 units)

BIO 250.       Elements of Human Anatomy and Physiology (3)

BIO 251.       Elements of Human Anatomy
and Physiology Laboratory (1)

CSC 101.      Computer Applications for Scientists (2)

HSC 201.      Health Care Systems and Perspectives (3)

MAT 131.    Elementary Statistics and Probability (3)

NOTE:  Students are advised to take MAT 131 to meet both the General Education quantitative reasoning requirement and the Health Science lower division requirement.

 

B.  Upper Division Requirements  (15 units)

1.   Required Course (3 units)

HSC 492.        Research Methods in Health Sciences (3)

 

2.   Select four courses from the following (12 units):

HEA 312.       Introduction to Public Health (3)

HEA 314.       Health Behavior (3)

HEA 315.       Interpersonal Skills in
Health Communication (3)

HEA 318.       Health Resources Management (3)

HEA 317.       Pathophysiology for Orthotics & Prosthetics  (3)  (for O & P students only) or

HSC 308.       Pathophysiology for Health Professions (3)

 

A Student selecting the Health Care Management or Community Health Option must also satisfy the requirement of a minor field.  The minor should be selected in consultation with an advisor with the goal of contributing to one’s career objectives and personal growth.

The recommended minors for the Health Science Major are: biology, business administration, economics, psychology, public administration, sociology.

 

In addition to the common core requirements, all Health Science majors must choose one of the following options:

 

Community Health Option (45 units)

Students completing this major will need to complete a minor in another field.

A.  Common Core Requirements (27 units)

 

B.  Upper Division Required Courses (9 units)

HEA 460.     Community Health Agencies (3)

HEA 468.     Multicultural Health (3)

HEA 490.     Health Science Senior Seminar (3)

 

C.  Select three courses from the following (9 units):

BIO  374.      Drug Abuse (3)

BIO  386.      Human Aging (3)

HEA  466.    Environmental Health Problems (3)

HEA  474.    Seminar in Health Care Ethics (3)

HSC  495.     Special Topics in Health Sciences  (1-3)*

PSY   353.     The Experience of Death and Dying: Psychological Perspectives (3)

PUB  373.     Health Policy (3)

 

*NOTE:  When taking HSC 495.  Special Topics in Health Sciences, please consult a Health Science advisor.  HSC 495 may be taken more than once, if the topic is different.

 

Health Care Management Option (45 units)

A.  Common Core Requirements (27 units)

B.  Upper Division Required Courses (9 units)

HEA  472.    Survey of Health Care Finance (3)

HEA  474.    Seminar in Health Care Ethics (3)

HEA  490.    Health Science Senior Seminar (3)

C.  Select three courses from the following (9 units):

HEA  466.    Environmental Health Problems (3)

HEA 468.     Multicultural Health (3)

HEA  470.    Legal Issues in the Health Science (3)

HSC  491.     Management Skills in Health Sciences (3)

HSC  495.     Special Topics in Health Sciences  (1-3)*

PUB  301.     Administrative Leadership and Behavior (3)

PUB  303.     Public Personnel Administration (3) 

PUB  371.     Health Services Administration (3)

PUB  373.     Health Policy (3)

 

*NOTE:  When taking HSC 495.  Special Topics in Health Sciences, please consult a health science advisor.  HSC 495 may be taken more than once, if the topic is different.

 

Prosthetics Option (64 units)

Single field major - no minor required

Students who plan to apply to this option, should have completed 54-60 lower division transferable units.  Students who plan to enter the prosthetics option are advised to select lower division General Education courses which also meet the requirements listed below, or equivalents.

A.  Prerequisites or equivalents

BIO 102.       General Biology (3)*

BIO 250.       Elements of Human Anatomy and Physiology (3)

BIO 251.       Elements of Human Anatomy
and Physiology Laboratory (1)

CHE 102.      Chemistry for the Citizen  (3)* or

CHE 110.    General Chemistry I (5)

MAT 153.    College Algebra and Trigonometry (4)*

PHY 120.      Elements of Physics I (4)

PSY 101.       Understanding Human Behavior (3)*

CSC 101.      Computer Applications for Scientists (2)

 

*NOTE:  These courses qualify for credit in General Education.

 

B.  Common Core Requirements (27 units)

Must include HEA 317, Pathophysiology for Orthotics and Prosthetics

C.  Lower Division Required Courses  (7 units)

HEA 205.     Introduction to Orthotics and Prosthetics (3)

HEA 231.     Clinical Protocol in Orthotics and Prosthetics (3)

HEA 250.     Normal and Pathological Gait (1)**

 

D.  Upper Division Required Courses  (30 units)

HEA 335.     Orthotics and Prosthetics Practice Management (2)**

HEA 345.     Biomechanics and Kinesiology for Orthotics and Prosthetics (2)**

HEA 350.     Below Knee Prosthetics I (3)**

HEA 352.     Below Knee Prosthetics II (3)**

HEA 354.     Above Knee Prosthetics I (3)**

HEA 355.     Material Science and Applied Anatomy in Orthotics and Prosthetics (4)**

HEA 450.     Upper Limb Prosthetics (3)**

HEA 452.     Above Knee Prosthetics II (3)**

HEA 493.     Preceptorship in Orthotics and Prosthetics (3)**

HSC 498.      Directed Research in Health Sciences (1)**

KIN 301.       Kinesiology (3)

*NOTE:  ** Indicates these courses are taken off-site; registration in Extended Education.

 

Physician Assistant Option - California Licensed Track (79 units)

Single field major - no minor required

(Applicants must be certified and licensed PAs)

A.  Recommended Prerequisites or equivalents

BIO 250.       Elements of Human Anatomy and Physiology  (3)

BIO 251.       Elements of Human Anatomy
and Physiology Laboratory (1)

CHE 102.      Chemistry for the Citizen  (3)  or

CHE 110.    General Chemistry  (5)

PSY 101.       Understanding Human Behavior  (3)

SOC 101.      The Individual in Society  (3)  or0

ANT 100.     Introduction to Cultures  (3)

ENG 110.      Freshman Composition I  (3)

ENG 111.      Freshman Composition II  (3)

 

B.  Common Core Requirements (27 units)

 

C.  Upper Division Required Professional Courses  (4 units)

HEA 401.     Physician Assistant Historical and Philosophical Perspectives and Professional Review  (1)

HEA 402.     Physician Assistant Ethical
Perspectives and Professional Review  (1)

HEA 403.     Physician Assistant Political
Perspectives and Professional Review  (1)

HEA 404.     Physician Assistant Legal
Perspectives and Professional Review  (1)

 

D.  Additional Upper Division Required Courses  (48 units)

Students in the California Licensed PA Track will receive from the PA faculty, the course goals and objectives, review outlines, and reading lists from which to study before taking a competency test in each of the following courses.  One test for each of the enrolled courses will be given  each semester.  Students are expected to spend a minimum of 15 hours study time weekly.  Students must pass examinations with a "C" or higher in all PA courses.  The following courses will be taken by review and testing.

HEA 321.     Patient Assessment (3)

HEA 322.     Principles of Therapeutics (3)

HEA 323.     Primary Care (3)

HEA 324.     Internal Care (4)

HEA 325.     Surgery and Orthopedics (3)

HEA 326.     Medical Specialties (3)

HEA 327.     History and Physical Examination Practica (3)

HEA 420.     Primary Care Medicine:
Current Concepts and Practice (2)

HEA 421.     Advanced Clinical Primary Care I (4)

HEA 422.     Advanced Clinical Primary Care II (8)

HEA 423.     Advanced Clinical Primary Care III (4)

HEA 424.     Family Medicine Preceptorship
and Clinical Selective (8)

 

Radiologic Technology Option (69 units)

A.  Prerequisites or equivalents

BIO 250.       Elements of Human Anatomy and Physiology  (3)

BIO 251.       Elements of Human Anatomy
and Physiology Laboratory (1)

ENG 110.      Freshman Composition I (3)*

ENG 111.      Freshman Composition II (3)*

PSY 101.       Understanding Human Behavior (3)* or

SOC 101.     The Individual in Society (3)*

ANT 100.     Introduction to Cultures (3)*

PHY 100.      Patterns in Nature (3)* or

PHY 106.      Physical Science (3)* or

PHY 120.      Elements of Physics I (4)*

CHE 110.      General Chemistry I (5)*

 

NOTE:  *These courses qualify for credit in General Education.

B.  Common Core Requirements (27 units)

C.  Lower Division Required Courses  (3 units)

HEA 280.     Orientation and Elementary Radiation Protection (1)

HEA 281.     Medical Terminology: Radiology (1)

HEA 287.     Clinical Practicum I  (1)

D.  Upper Division Required Courses  (39 units)

HEA 380.     Darkroom Chemistry and Techniques (1)

HEA 381.     Patient Care Procedures Related to Radiology (2)

HEA 382.     Principles of Radiographic Exposure (3)

HEA 383.     Common Radiographic Procedures
Using Contrast Media (2)

HEA 384.     Topographic Anatomy & Positioning I (3)

HEA 385.     Radiation Protection (3)

HEA 387.     Clinical Practicum II (3)

HEA 388.     Clinical Practicum III (3)

HEA 480.     Radiologic Physics (2)

HEA 481.     Topographic Anatomy & Positioning II (3)

HEA 482.     Special Radiographic Procedures (2)

HEA 483.     Subspecialities in Radiology (2)

HEA 485.     Departmental Administrative
and Office Procedures, Computer Literacy  (1)

HEA 487.     Clinical Practicum IV (1)

HEA 488.     Clinical Practicum V (3)

HEA 489.     Clinical Practicum VI (3)

HEA 499.     Senior Research Project in Radiology (1,1)

 

Diagnostic Imaging Option -
BSHS Degree Track  (69 units)

A.  Recommended Prerequisites or Equivalents

BIO 250.       Elements of Human Anatomy and Physiology (3)

BIO 251.       Elements of Human Anatomy
and Physiology Laboratory (1)

ENG 110.      Freshman Composition I (3)*

ENG 111.      Freshman Composition II (3)*

PSY 101.       Understanding Human Behavior (3)* or

SOC 101.     The Individual in Society (3)*

ANT 100.     Introduction to Cultures (3)*

PHY 100.      Patterns in Nature (3)* or

PHY 106.      Physical Science (3)* or

PHY 120.      Elements of Physics I (4)*

CHE 110.      General Chemistry I (5)*

 

NOTE:  *These courses qualify for credit in General Education.

B.  Common Core Requirements (27 units)

The following courses will be taught by review and testing.

C.  Lower Division Required Courses  (3 units)

HEA 280.     Orientation and Elementary Radiation Protection (1)

HEA 281.     Medical Terminology: Radiology (1)

HEA 287.     Clinical Practicum I  (1)

D.  Upper Division Required Courses  (39 units)

HEA 380.     Darkroom Chemistry and Techniques (1)

HEA 381.     Patient Care Procedures Related to Radiology (2)

HEA 382.     Principles of Radiographic Exposure (3)

HEA 383.     Common Radiographic
Procedures Using Contrast Media (2)

HEA 384.     Topographic Anatomy & Positioning I (3)

HEA 385.     Radiation Protection (3)

HEA 387.     Clinical Practicum II (3)

HEA 388.     Clinical Practicum III (3)

HEA 371.     Radiologic Technology Legal
Perspectives and Professional Review (1)

HEA 372.     Radiologic Technology  Historical and Philosophical Perspectives and Professional Review (1)

HEA 373.     Radiologic Technology Ethical
Perspectives and Professional Review (1)

HEA 374.     Radiologic Technology Political and Social Perspectives and Professional Review (1)

HEA 375.     Radiologic Technology Future
Perspectives and Professional Review (1)

HEA 480.     Radiologic Physics (2)

HEA 481.     Topographic Anatomy & Positioning II (3)

HEA 482.     Special Radiographic Procedures (2)

HEA 483.     Subspecialities in Radiology (2)

HEA 485.     Departmental Administrative
and Office Procedures, Computer Literacy  (1)

HEA 487.     Clinical Practicum IV (1)

HEA 488.     Clinical Practicum V (3)

HEA 489.     Clinical Practicum VI (3)

HEA 499.     Senior Research Project in Radiology (1,1)

 

 

Minor in Health Science (15 units)

The Minor in Health Science is designed for students majoring in another field that can be strengthened with a solid background in Health Science.

A.  Lower Division Required Courses  (3 units)

BIO 250.       Elements of Human Anatomy and Physiology (3) 

 

B.  Additional Required Courses  (12 units)

1.   Select three courses from the following (9 units):

HEA 312.       Introduction to Public Health (3)

HEA 314.       Health Behavior (3)

HEA 315.       Interpersonal Skills in
Health Communication (3)

HSC 201.        Health Care Systems and Perspectives (3)

HSC 308.        Pathophysiology in Health Professions (3)

2.   Select one course from the following (3 units):

HEA 460.       Community Health Agencies (3)

HEA 466.       Environmental Health Problems (3)

HEA 470.       Legal Issues in Health Sciences (3)

HEA 472.       Survey of Health Care Finance (3)

 

 

 

Master of Science
in Health Sciences

Admission Procedures

Students must submit an application to the University for admission (or readmission) with graduate standing, and official transcripts of previous college work in accordance with the procedures outlined in the “Admissions” section of the University Catalog. 

 

General Admission Requirements

The student will qualify for admission to the program if he/she:

1.   has a baccalaureate degree from an accredited university.  (See the University Catalog for requirements of graduates
of non-accredited institutions.);

2.   has met the TOEFL requirement with a score of 575 or above on the written test or a minimum score of 213 on the computer based test;

3.   has a grade point average of at least 2.5 (4.00 scale) in his/her last 60 semester units of upper division course work; lower division courses taken after obtaining the bachelor's degree and extension courses, (except CSU Dominguez Hills upper division resident extension courses or the equivalent on another campus), will be excluded from the calculation; and

4.   is in good standing at the last college attended.

Graduate Classified Standing

Only those applicants who show promise of success will be admitted to the graduate program, and only those who continue to demonstrate a satisfactory level of scholastic competence and fitness shall be eligible to proceed in the curriculum.  To receive Graduate Classified Standing, i.e. to be admitted to the Master of Science in Health Sciences, Physician Assistant option, a student must have completed the admission requirements previously stated.

Graduate Conditionally Classified Standing

This standing allows students who are potentially eligible for admission, but have some deficiencies, to enroll in the graduate program.  A student is admitted in this category if, in the opinion
of the program's graduate coordinator, he/she can remedy any deficiencies in prerequisite preparation by specified additional work.

Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement

All graduate students entering the University in the Fall of 1983 or thereafter are required to satisfy the Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (GWAR) in accordance with the established policies of the University.  Students must satisfy the requirement before being Advanced to Candidacy.  (See the  "Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement" section of the University Catalog.)

Advancement to Candidacy

Upon completion of the second semester after admission, or
22 units of approved coursework, the student must complete the Graduation Advisement and Advancement to Candidacy Form. 
To be Advanced to Candidacy, the student must have:

1.   achieved Graduate Classified Standing;

2.   maintained a grade point average of 3.0 or better in all graduate coursework to be used for the degree;

3.   completed the Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (GWAR);

4.   completed the Graduation Advisement and Advancement to Candidacy forms in consultation with the graduate coordinator; and

5.   applied and paid graduation fees.

 

Continuing Student Status

Students must maintain continuous enrollment throughout their time in the graduate program.  Students who miss a semester will have to reapply to the university and to the program, and may find that some previous coursework may not be recognized.  (Students should consult the graduate admission regulations in the Graduate Degree section of the University Catalog concerning credit for transfer graduate work).  Students who are unable to attend the University for one semester should enroll in a Graduate continuation Course, HSC 600 or CLS 600, to maintain continuous enrollment.  Students must be enrolled in the semester they graduate.

Course Currency Requirement

Students have a maximum of only five years to complete all graduation requirements, including all coursework, examinations, and thesis or project.  Course work that does not meet the five-year deadline will have to be repeated or replaced by other courses with the approval of the program coordinator.

 

Degree Requirements  (33-44 units)

Students must select one of the options listed. 

 

Physician Assistant Option  (44 units)

In addition to meeting the General Admission requirements for the Master of Science in Health Sciences program, a student applying to the Physician Assistant Residency option will qualify for admission to the program if he/she:

1.   has graduated from a primary care physician assistant training program approved by the American Medical Association Committee on Allied Health Education and Administration, or successive agency;

2.   has passed the National Commission on Certification
of Physician Assistants examination and has current certification;

3.   has a current primary care physician assistant license in California or eligibility;

4.   has submitted three letters of recommendation, including one from the director of the physician assistant training program where graduated and one from a supervising physician;

5.   has completed a successful interview with the program's Graduate Coordinator and representatives from the program faculty and adjunct faculty in the clinical speciality;

While not a specific requirement, previous experience practicing as a physician assistant is desirable.

Applicants who do not meet the above admission requirements may be admitted conditionally upon approval of the graduate coordinator.

A.  Required Courses  (12 units)

HSC 501.      Advanced Research Methods in Health Science  (3)

HSC 502.      Principles of Epidemiology  (3)

HSC 503.      Health Promotion and Disease Prevention  (3)

HSC 598.      Directed Research  (1,1)*

HSC 599.      Graduate Capstone Activity  (1)

*NOTE:  Students electing to take the comprehensive examination, substitute HSC 594 Independent Study (2).

B.  Electives:  Select two courses from the following:  (6 units)

HSC 504.      Health Policy and Administration
for Health Professions  (3)

HSC 505.      Teaching and Learning in the Health Professions  (3)

HSC 506.      Critical Assessment of Health Science Literature  (3)

HSC 594.      Independent Study  (1-3)

HSC 595.      Special Topics  (1-3)

 

C.  Required Option Courses:  Select one of the following residencies  (26 units):

1.   Emergency Medicine Residency

HSC 510.        Orientation to Emergency Medicine  (2)

HSC 511.        Advanced Clinical Studies: 
Emergency Medicine Residency (8,8,8)

2.   Cardiac Medicine and Surgery Residency

HSC 513.        Orientation to Cardiac
Medicine and Surgery  (2)

HSC 514.        Advanced Clinical Studies:  Cardiac
Medicine and Surgery Residency  (8,8,8)

3.   Gerontology Residency

HSC 516.        Orientation to Gerontology  (2)

HSC 517.        Advanced Clinical Studies: 
Gerontology Residency (8,8,8)

4.   Surgery Residency

HSC 519.        Orientation to Surgery  (2)

HSC 520.        Advanced Clinical Studies: 
Surgery Residency (8,8,8)

5.   Pediatrics Residency

HSC 522.        Orientation to Pediatrics  (2)

HSC 523.        Advanced Clinical Studies: 
Pediatric Residency  (8,8,8)

6.   Neonatology Residency

HSC 525.        Orientation to Neonatology  (2)

HSC 526.        Advanced Clinical Studies: 
Neonatology Residency (8,8,8)

7.   Internal Medicine Residency

HSC 528.        Orientation to Internal Medicine  (2)

HSC 529.        Advanced Clinical Studies: 
Internal Medicine Residency  (8,8,8)

8.   Family Medicine Residency

HSC 531.        Orientation to Family medicine  (2)

HSC 532.        Advanced Clinical Studies: 
Family Medicine Residency  (8,8,8)

 

Professional Studies Option (33 units)

The Professional Studies option is for health practitioners who wish to expand their role function to include management, teaching, or research.  Students select one of these areas for in-depth study based on course work and practicum.

In addition to meeting the general admission requirements for the Master of Science in Health Sciences program, a student applying to the Professional Studies option must have or be eligible for a U.S. recognized credential and/or license in one of the health professions.

A.  Required Courses (20 units)

HSC 500.      Health Care Leadership and Management (3)

HSC 501.      Advanced Research Methods in Health Science (3)

HSC 504.      Health Policy and Administration for Health Professionals  (3)

HSC 508.      Ethical Issues in Health Care Management (3)

HSC 509.      Communication and Group Dynamics                  in Healthcare  (3)

HSC 596.      Practicum in Professional Studies (3)

HSC 598.      Directed Research (1,1)

 

B.  Track Courses (12 units)

Select one of the following tracks:

1.  Management Track

HSC 512.        Principles of Managed Care (3)

HSC 515.        Organizational Theory and Behavior (3)

HSC 518.        Finance and Cost Accounting (3)

HSC 530.        Healthcare Strategic Planning                        and Marketing (3)

2.  Education Track

HSC 502.        Principles of Epidemiology (3)

HSC 503.        Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (3)

HSC 505.        Teaching Strategies for Health                      Professionals (3)

HSC 507.        Measurement and Assessment in Health Professions Education (3)

3.  Research Track

CLS 504.         Data Collection and Processing (3)

HSC 506.        Critical Assessment of Health Science Literature (3)

HSC 521.        Compliance, Health Law and Research (3)

HSC 524.        Health Science Research and                         Funded Projects (3)

 

C.  Thesis or Project (1)

HSC 599.      Capstone Activity (1)

Students must write a thesis or conduct a special project as the culminating experience for awarding the degree Master of Science in Health Science.  A student may request to write a thesis or to conduct a special project culminating in a significant written report to satisfy the HSC 598 Directed Research requirement.  The topic of the research or the special project must be approved in advance and supervised by the chair of the thesis or project committee.  Theses and projects must be approved in advance of enrollment in HSC 598.  An oral presentation and discussion of the thesis/project is required as part of the HSC 599 Graduate Capstone Activity course.

D.  Continuous Enrollment

See "Readmission of Former Students" in the  Graduate Degrees and Postbaccalaureate Studies section of the University Catalog for complete details.

Course Offerings

The credit value for each course in semester units is indicated for each term by a number in parentheses following the title.  Departments may indicate the term in which they expect to offer the course by
the use of:  “F” (fall), “S” (spring) or “EOY” (every other year).

 

Health Science

Lower Division

HEA 100   Health and Lifestyles (3) FS. 

To familiarize the student with relationships among the physical, social and psychological aspects of health, which include:  self-care, prevention and analysis of personal health problems through participation in self-assessment techniques. Topics include the relationship of lifestyles to nutrition, stress, physical fitness, death and dying, and mental illness. 

HEA 205   Introduction to Orthotics and Prosthetics (3) F.

Prerequisites:  BIO 250 and BIO 251, or consent of instructor.

Examination of the history and current state of O & P services.  Review of methods, materials, and biomechanics.  Overview of lower and upper limb prosthetics and orthotics, and spinal orthotics.  ADA and the meaning of disability.  Professional ethics, qualifications and certification.

HEA 231   Clinical Protocols in Orthotics and Prosthetics (3) S.

Prerequisite:  HEA 205. Co-requisite:  HEA 317

O&P evaluation and treatment concepts; history, diagnosis, prescription, physical examination, assessment, plan and education.  Overview of surface anatomy.  Causes of amputation, amputation surgery, and post-op protocols.  Patient-practitioner interaction and communication.  Introduction to taking impressions and model preparation.

HEA 250   Normal and Pathological Gait (1).

Prerequisite:  BIO 250 and BIO 251

Learn to recognize gait and postural deviations, determine cause and suggest mechanical remedies.  Students will evaluate patients and videotapes, review EMG and force plate recordings, compare results of surgery, therapy, and mechanical aids. 
Fee required.

HEA 280   Orientation and Elementary Radiation Protection (1).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Orientation to applied medicine, hospitals and radiology departments.  Introduces students to overall view of radiology and ethical principles.  Basic radiation protection instruction to allow students to begin the clinical practicum. 

HEA 281   Medical Terminology: Radiology (1).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Programmed approach to general medical terminology with emphasis on radiology and applied specialties.  Review of common medical terms, prefixes, suffixes and roots. 

HEA 287   Clinical Practicum I (1).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Supervised Clinical rotations through support areas of radiology department: filerooms, darkrooms, patient transport and scheduling.  Introduction to hospital environment and health care team. 
Film critiques.  Practicum 280 hours.

 

Upper Division

HEA 300   Health in Public Education (3) FS.

Prerequisite:  HEA 100 or equivalent is recommended. 

Health education required course for the professional multiple or single-subject, clear credential teaching applicants.  Covers all topics designated in the Health Framework for California, including personal health, family health, nutrition, the physiological and sociological effects of substance abuse, cardiopulmonary resuscitation and child abuse.

HEA 312   Introduction to Public Health (3) FS. 

Prerequisite: HSC 492. 

Nature, transmission, and control of disease from a public health perspective:  Historical background, current problems, trends in prevention and control, and applications
to health care planning. Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. 

HEA 314   Health Behavior (3) FS.

Current concepts of the behavioral sciences in the health field with specific application to ethnically and culturally diverse urban communities.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. 

HEA 315   Interpersonal Skills in Health Communication (3) FS. 

Fundamentals, principles, and skills of interpersonal and group processes in health related occupations.  Special emphasis on theory and techniques of interviewing, small group dynamics, crisis intervention and interpersonal management skills in ethnically and culturally diverse urban settings.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. 

HEA 317   Pathophysiology for Orthotics and Prosthetics (3) S.

Prerequisites:  HEA 205; Co-Requisite:  HEA 231.

A study of the etiology, clinical signs and symptoms, treatments, prognosis, and social implications of pathological conditions that affect the neurological, musculoskeletal, and vascular systems and that require orthotic/prosthetic intervention:  low back pain, scoliosis, spinal injury, arthritis, stroke, trauma, and diabetes. Fee required.

HEA 318   Health Resources Management (3) FS.

Prerequisite: HSC 201. 

Concepts, issues, and skills in administration and management of a health care unit, including personnel, finances, equipment, supplies, and facilities.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. 

HEA 321   Patient Assessment (3) F.

Prerequisite:  Admission into the Physician Assistant Option.

This course encompasses the skills and techniques necessary to gather a complete, appropriate history and physical examination.  Interviewing, communication and charting are included.  An overview of laboratory tests and radiologic procedures are also included.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language
by successfully completing oral and written assignments. 

HEA 322   Principles of Therapeutics (3) F.

Prerequisite: Admission into the Physician Assistant Option. 

This course offers an overview of pharmacologic principles and an introduction
to drugs and drug therapy.  Principles of nutrition, nutritional history and assessment are also taught as integral in diagnosis, treatment, and preventive medicine.

HEA 323   Primary Care (3) F.

Prerequisite:  Admission into the Physician Assistant Option.

This course forms the core of the primary care areas that includes obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, geriatrics, family medicine, health promotion and disease prevention.

HEA 324   Internal Medicine (4) S.

Prerequisite:  Admission into the Physician Assistant Option.

This course deals with adult, internal medicine which includes pulmonary medicine, cardiology, hepatobiliary medicine, genitourinary medicine, gastrointestinal medicine, rheumatology, hematology, onocology, endocrinology, sexually-transmitted disease, and
dermatology. 

HEA 325   Surgery and Orthopedics (3) F.

Prerequisite:  Admission into the Physician Assistant Option.

This course outlines principles of surgery
to prepare students for in-patient clinical experience and offers an introduction to orthopedics.

HEA 326   Medical Specialties (3) S.

Prerequisite:  Admission into the Physician Assistant Option.

This course includes ophthalmology, ear nose-throat, psychiatry, neurology, and emergency medicine and emphasizes diagnosis, assessment, initial management and stabilization of the patient.

HEA 327   History and Physical Examination Practica (3) S.

Prerequisite:  Admission into the Physician Assistant Option.

This is the clinical practice component of patient assessment. Students will combine HEA 321 with the supervised practice sessions to lay the foundation for clinical experiences.

HEA 335   Orthotic and Prosthetic Practice Management (2).

Prerequisites:  Admission to the Orthotics and Prosthetics Option.

Course will address practice management issues in the O&P office.  It includes ABC Canon of Ethics, professionalism, cultural diversity, patient interviews, medical documentation, rehabilitation team practices, HCFA billing system, letters of medical necessity, HMO contracts, O&P cost economics, and marketing.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. Fee required.

HEA 340   Lower Limb Orthotics I (3)  S-EOY.

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor; admission to Orthotics/Prosthetics option.

Patient evaluation, prescription recommendation; orthoses measurement, fabrication and fitting.  Lower limb biomechanics, gait analysis, and motor disability.  Fabrication and fitting of several orthoses including arch support, UCBL foot orthoses, and ankle-foot orthoses (metal, plastic and patellar-tendon bearing).  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

HEA 342   Lower Limb Orthotics II (3) F-EOY.

Prerequisite:  HEA 340.

Continuation of HEA 340.  Patient evaluation, prescription recommendations, orthoses measurement, lower limb biomechanics, gait analysis, and motor disability.  Fabrication and fitting of several knee-ankle-foot orthoses.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week. 
Fee required.

HEA 344   Spinal Orthotics (3) S-EOY.

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

Admission to Orthotics/Prosthetics option. Patient evaluation, prescription recommendation, orthosis measurement, fabrication and fitting.  Spinal biomechanics and motor disability.  Fitting of several orthoses, including lumbo-sacral, thoraco-lumbo-sacral, and cervical types. Fabrication of at least five orthoses.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

HEA 350   Below Knee Prosthetics I (3) S-EOY.

Prerequisite:  HEA 250. 

Fabrication, fitting, and dynamic alignment of patellar-tendon bearing prostheses.  All fittings include test sockets, bench, static and dynamic alignments.  Four sockets completed using PTB and PTS designs.  Medical management, prescription considerations.  One completed below-knee prosthesis.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

HEA 352   Below Knee Prosthetics II (3) S-EOY.

Prerequisite:  HEA 350.

Fabrication, fitting, and dynamic alignment of patellar-tendon bearing prostheses.  All fittings include test sockets, bench, static and dynamic alignments.  Four sockets completed using PTB and PTS designs.  Medical management, prescription considerations.  One completed below-knee prosthesis.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

HEA 354   Above Knee Prosthetics I (3) F-EOY.

Prerequisite:  HEA 352.

Casting, measurement, transparent test socket fitting, bench, static and dynamic alignments, and methods for evaluation of proper fit.  Fitting of two quadrilateral sockets including suction and pelvic suspension.  Demonstration of endoskeletal and exoskeletal above knee systems.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

HEA 355   Material Science and Applied Anatomy in Orthotics and Prosthetics (4)

Prerequisites:  HEA 205 and HEA 231.

Principles of stress, strain, Young's modulus.  Plastic and metal strength characteristics.  Polymer chemistry and mechanical properties of plastics.  Selection of appropriate orthotic/prosthetic materials and components based on mechanical goals.  Tissue interfaces.  Muscle and joint structure and function, and relationship to prosthetic and orthotic interventions.

HEA 371  Radiologic Technology Legal Perspectives  and Review (1).   

Prerequisite:  Admission to Radiologic Technology Option - CRT.

Explores the foundations of the radiologic technology profession from legal perspective and coordinates study of current issues, theories and techniques related to health care delivery; principles of dark room technology and radiation protection, and medical terminology.

HEA 372   Radiologic Technology Historical and Philosophical Perspective and Professional Review (1).  

Prerequisite:  Admission to Radiologic Technology Option - CRT.

Explores the foundations of the radiologic technology profession from historical and philosophical perspectives and coordinates study of current issues, theories and techniques related to concepts and practice of fundamental patient care, radiologic exposure and routine radiologic procedures. 

HEA 373   Radiologic Technology Ethical Perspectives and Professional Review (1). 

Prerequisite:  Admission to Radiologic Technology Option - CRT.

Explores the foundations of the radiologic technology profession from an ethical perspective and coordinates study of current issues, theories and techniques related to radiographic procedures using contrast media, topographic anatomy and positioning, and routine fluoroscopic procedures. 

HEA 374   Radiologic Technology Political and Social Perspectives and Professional Review (1). 

Prerequisite:  Admission to Radiologic Technology Option - CRT.

Explores the foundations of the radiologic technology profession from a political and social perspective and coordinates study of current issues, theories and techniques related to radiation protection and federal and state regulations, radiologic physics, topographic anatomy and positioning, and routine exams in pediatrics, surgery and genitourinary room.

HEA 375   Radiologic Technology Future Perspectives and Professional Review (1). 

Prerequisite:  Admission to Radiologic Technology Option - CRT.

Explores the future of the radiologic technology profession from a technological, as well as professional perspective and coordinates study of current issues, theories and techniques related to special radiologic procedures, sub-specialties, and departmental and administrative procedures, and senior research topics. 

HEA 380   Darkroom Chemistry
and Techniques (1).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Darkroom construction, hand and automatic processing, film artifacts, processing aspects, and prevention.  Quality control and darkroom chemistry. 

HEA 381   Patient Care Procedures Related to Radiology (2).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Introduction to fundamental patient care procedures and principles in radiology departments: patient care/handling, body mechanics, aseptic technique, emergency procedures and use/care support equipment in preparation for patient contact. 

HEA 382   Principles of
Radiographic Exposure (3).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Basic radiographic principles: image formation, intensifying screens, factors affecting quality, calibration, equipment design/function, filters, electromagnetic radiation and exposure factors.  Teaches mechanics of performing examinations. 

HEA 383   Common Radiographic Procedures Using Contrast Media (2).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Positioning and exposure techniques for contrast studies (esophograms, barium enemas, etc.) fluoroscopic techniques. Introduction to the uses, contraindications, and pharmacology of contrast media. 

HEA 384   Topographical Anatomy
& Positioning I (3).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Introduces topographic anatomy and positioning procedures necessary to produce diagnostic radiographs of the entire body (except  the skull).  Exposure control techniques and exam indications. 

HEA 385   Radiation Protection (3).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Principles of radiation safety, biological effects, x-ray production, and radiation detection devices. Emphasis on federal and state regulations.

HEA 387   Clinical Practicum II (3).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Supervised rotations through routine diagnostic rooms.  Perform radiologic examinations on patients under direct supervision of a technologist.  These  will include x-rays and film critiques of the thoracic and appendicular skeleton.  Rotation through emergency rooms, orthopedics, and portable radiography.  Practicum 580 hours.

HEA 388   Clinical Practicum III (3).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Supervised rotation through routine radiographic/fluoroscopic rooms, including surgery.  Perform routine diagnostic examinations (except skull), fluoroscopic and intra-operative exams.  Weekend rotations begin.  Film critiques.  Practicum 580 hours.

HEA 395   Special Topics in Health Science (1-3).

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

Study of a topic of interest to students pursuing a career in the health professions.  Topic will vary as announced.  One to three hours of lecture per week.

HEA 401   Physician Assistant Historical and Philosophical Perspectives and Professional Review  (1)

Prerequisites:  Admission to the Physician Assistant Option; concurrent enrollment in HEA 321, HEA 322, HEA 323, and HEA 325.

One of four courses to promote currency and excellence in physician assistant practice.  Explores foundations of the PA profession from historical and philosophical perspectives and coordinates study of current issues, theories and techniques of patient assessment, principles of therapeutics, primary care, surgery and orthopedics.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. 

HEA 402   Physician Assistant Ethical Perspectives and Professional Review  (1)

Prerequisites:  Admission to the Physician Assistant Option; concurrent enrollment in HEA 324, HEA 326, HEA 327, and HEA 421.

The second of four courses to promote currency and excellence in physician assistant practice.  Explores foundations of the PA profession from an ethical perspective and coordinates study of current issues, theories and techniques of internal care, medical specialities, history and physical examination practica and advanced primary care I.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. 

HEA 403   Physician Assistant Political Perspectives and Professional Review  (1)

Prerequisites:  Admission to the Physician Assistant Option; concurrent enrollment in
HEA 420 and HEA 422.

The third of four courses to promote currency and excellence in physician assistant practice.  Explores foundations of the PA profession from a political perspective and coordinates study of current issues, theories and techniques related to concepts and practice of primary care medicine and advanced clinical primary care II.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. 

HEA 404   Physician Assistant Legal Perspectives and         Professional Review (1).

Prerequisites:  Admission to the Physician Assistant Option; concurrent enrollment in
HEA 423 and HEA 424.

The fourth of four courses to promote currency and excellence in physician assistant practice.  Explores foundations of the PA profession from a legal perspective and coordinates study of current issues, theories and techniques related to advanced clinical primary care III, family medicine preceptorship and clinical selectives.  Students must demonstrate proficiency
in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. 

HEA 420   Primary Care Medicine:  Current Concepts and Practice (2) F.

Prerequisites:  Admission into the Physician Assistant Option.

A presentation of selected cases encountered in primary care with emphasis on current thinking on evaluation and management for re-entry into the clinic. Integration of skills in:  history-taking, physical examination, laboratory techniques, pharmacology, prevention and patient education.

HEA 421   Advanced Clinical Primary Care I (4) S.

Prerequisites: Admission into the Physician Assistant Option.

Integration of didactic materials with practical patient care skills learned in clinical clerkship rotations 1 through 3, under clinical supervisors and augmented with reading assignments and small group study.

HEA 422   Advanced Clinical Primary Care II (8) F.

Prerequisites: Admission into the Physician Assistant Option.

Integration of didactic materials with practical patient care skills learned in clinical clerkship rotations 4 through 6, under clinical supervisors and augmented with reading assignments and small group study.

HEA 423   Advanced Clinical Primary Care III (4) S.

Prerequisites:  Admission into the Physician Assistant Option.

Integration of didactic materials with practical patient care  skills learned in clinical clerkship rotations 7 through 8, under clinical supervisors and augmented with reading assignments and  small group study.

HEA 424   Family Medicine Preceptorship and Clinical Selective (8) S.

Prerequisites:  Admission into the Physician Assistant Option.

A two-week intensive study of an elected subject area and an extended three-month family medicine clerkship.  Primary care curriculum is integrated in this course.

HEA 440   Upper Limb Orthotics (2)   F-EOY.

Prerequisite:  HEA 242.

Evaluation, prescription recommendations, orthoses measurement, fabrication and fitting.  Anatomy, biomechanics, and motor disability of upper limb orthotics.  Special attention to deformity control, tissue protection, restored function. Fabrication and fitting of basic static hand and wrist-hand orthoses (including wrist-driven and external-power).  One hour of lecture and two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

HEA 442   Lower Limb Orthotics III (1-2) F-EOY.

Prerequisite:  HEA 342.

Advanced topics; ankle, knee and hip treatments related to Spina Bifida, Cerebral Palsey, brain injury, stroke, polio and other motor disabilities.  Lower limb biomechanics, gait analysis and material science.  Lectures on rotational control, tone reduction and specific application for children.  Fee required.

HEA 444   Spinal Orthotics II  (2) F-EOY

Prerequisite:  HEA 344

Treatment of scoliosis, kyphosis and cervical spine fractures. Patient evaluation, prescription recommendation, hospital protocol, orthoses measurement, fabrication and fitting.  Spinal biomechanics and motor disability.  Fabrication and/or fitting of Boston type jacket, Milwaukee brace, Minerva and halo orthosis.  One of hour of lecture and 2 hours of activity per week. Fee required.

HEA 450   Upper Limb Prosthetics (3) S-EOY.

Prerequisite:  HEA 354.

Prescription, casting, measurement, fabrication, alignment, harnessing and methods for evaluation of proper fit.  Principles of shoulder disarticulation prostheses.  Demonstration of myoelectric powered systems including identification of electrode sites, trouble-shooting, and prosthetic maintenance. Complete two below- and one above-elbow prostheses.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

HEA 452   Above Knee Prosthetics II (3) S-EOY.

Prerequisite:  HEA 354.

Continuation of HEA 354.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

HEA 460   Community Health Agencies (3) S.

Prerequisite:  HSC 201.

Examination and evaluation of state, federal, local and community health agencies and programs.  Survey and analyze community level drug, alcohol, communicable disease, and mental health problems and programs.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. 

HEA 466   Environmental Health Problems (3) F.

Prerequisite: HSC 201.

Impact of human activities on environmental quality and resulting environmental health problems, especially local issues, public and private responses to them.  Design, carry out, and analyze a study and prepare a written report of results.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. 

HEA 468  Multicultural Health (3) F

Prerequisite:  HEA 100 or equivalent.  SOC 101 and ANT 100 are recommended.

Study of social, cultural, psychological, and biological factors affecting the distribution of health, wellness, and illness in various ethnic, cultural, and racial groups.  Special attention is given to health issues of groups with special physical and mental health needs, including underserved and immigrant populations residing in California.  Graded A-C/NC. 

HEA 470   Legal Issues in the Health Sciences (3) S.

Prerequisite: HSC 201.  

Examination of new legislation, exploration of various health law issues that impact hospitals, individuals and groups within the health care sector; including informed consent, regulation/antitrust, licensure and credentialing, and medical ethics.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. 

HEA 472   Survey of Health Care Finance (3) F.

Prerequisite: HSC 201.

Concepts and issues in financial management of health care organizations.  Use of tools for cost effective decision-making and learn to recognize and deal with financial components of decision-making in health care organizations.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. 

HEA 474  Seminar in Health
Care Ethics (3). 

Prerequisites:  HSC 201;  HEA 470 and HEA 472 are recommended.

Intensive study of ethical issues raised in provision of health care and health care administration.  Current and historical arguments surrounding ethical issues will be discussed and analyzed.  Students will learn to recognize ethical dilemmas, apply ethical principles and resolve the dilemmas. 

HEA 480   Radiological Physics (2).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Emphasis of health and safety on electric circuits, generators, x-ray circuits, x-ray physics. 

HEA 481   Topographic Anatomy
and Positioning II (3).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Introduces topographic anatomy and positioning procedures necessary to produce diagnostic radiographs of the skull.  Exposure control techniques and exam indications included. 

HEA 482   Special Radiographic Procedures (2).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option or consent of instructor.

Radiographic anatomy and physiology, positioning, film evaluation and specialized equipment applying to highly technical exams (interventional radiography, tomography, CT and MRI).  Management
of acutely ill patients.
  Fee required.

HEA 483   Sub-Specialties in Radiology (2).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Introduction to principles of pediatric radiography, intraoral radiography, radiation therapy and nuclear medicine.  Image formation, equipment, techniques and handling of radiation and radionucleotides. 

HEA 485   Departmental Administrative and Office Procedures, Computer Literacy (1).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Introduction to organization and budgeting of a radiology department; use of computers in radiology and basic computer principles. 

HEA 487   Clinical Practicum IV (1).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Supervised rotations through routine radiographic/fluoroscopic, pediatric, surgical and genitourinary rooms.  Performs routine exams and film critiques (except skull) in all areas.  Practicum 280 hours.

HEA 488   Clinical Practicum V (3).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Supervised rotations through all areas of routine radiography, with student performing all routine diagnostic fluoroscopic and radiographic exams and film critiques, including skull radiography.  Student will
be able to perform radiologic procedures independently.  Practicum 580 hours.

HEA 489   Clinical Practicum VI (3).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Supervised rotations through special radiographic procedures, radiation therapy, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine, mammography and ultrasound.  Continued application in routine radiography, fluoroscopy and film critique.  Perform radiologic procedures independently.  Practicum 580 hours.

HEA 490   Health Science Senior            Seminar (1-3) S.

Prerequisites: Completion of Health Science core and two option courses;  HSC 201, HSC 492, HEA 312, HEA 314, HEA 315 and HSC 308 or HEA 317 and HEA 318.

Undertake an in-depth study employing techniques and principles used in the Health Science core and option. Designed for the Health Care Management and Community Health Options.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments.  One to three hours of seminar per week.

HEA 492   Research and Seminar in Orthotics and Prosthetics (2).

Prerequisite:  MAT 131, or consent of instructor.

Overview of the principles and applications of research.  Examination of testing and improving patient outcomes.  Basic concepts in research design, including literature review, identification of research question, development of data collection instruments, data analysis.  Write and present a research proposal.

HEA 493   Preceptorship in Orthotics and Prosthetics (2).  Summer-EOY.

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

125 hour placement in a private sector or institutional facility.  Repeatable for credit up to 8 units.  Fee required.

HEA 499   Senior Research Project in Radiology (1,1).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Individual research in radiology with student class presentation: learn presentation skills, use of A-V methods, oral skills, and written presentation.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments.  One hour of seminar activity per week.  Repeatable for credit for up to one unit.

Infrequently Offered Courses

 

HEA 240   Lower Limb Biomechanics and Kinesiology (3) S-EOY. 

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor; admission to Orthotics/Prosthetics Option.

Neuromusculoskeletal systems of the lower limb (above- and below-knee). For both normal function and in the presence of pathology.  Kinesiology of specific weaknesses and deformities will be studied.  Potential for orthotic and prosthetic management will be evaluated. Fee required.

HEA 242   Upper Limb Biomechanics and Kinesiology (2) F-EOY.

Prerequisite:  HEA 240.

Neuromusculoskeletal systems of the spine and upper limb:  both normal function and pathology. Specific weaknesses and deformities will be studied. Significance of upper limb pathology for orthotic/prosthetic design and management.
Fee required.

HEA 252   Material Science for Orthotics and Prosthetics (2) EOY.

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

Principles of stress, strain, Young’s Modulus.  Plastic/metal choices.  Preferred metal alloys, heat treatment, plastic polymer.  Polymer chemistry and mechanical properties of plastics.  Material designators, relationship of alloys to material properties.  Selection of most appropriate orthotic/prosthetic materials.  Fee required.

HEA 491   Research and Seminar in Orthotics and Prosthetics I (1) F-EOY.

Prerequisites:  HEA 440 and HEA 450.

Background literature review, hypothesis formation, study design, development of data collection instruments and data collection as phase one of orthotic/prosthetic research project.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments.  One hour of seminar per week. Fee required.

Division of
Health Sciences

Lower Division

HSC 201   Health Care Systems and Perspectives (3) FS.

Examination of healthcare delivery systems and personal health as integrated physiological, social, psychological processes.  Topics include role of healthcare providers; major healthcare organizations; contemporary healthcare issues; interactions of healthcare and physical environmental changes which influence health of the whole person. 

HSC 308   Pathophysiology for Health Professions (3) FS.

Prerequisite:  BIO 250 and either BIO 251, CHE 112, or equivalent.

Principles of clinical pathophysiology, including assessment of clinical data necessary for identifying the causes of diseases and evaluating the underlying mechanisms of pathologic processes.  Discussion of immune disorders, inflammation, neoplasia and genetic disorders.  Review of the individual organ system and associated pathology.  Case studies, written/and or oral reports. 

Upper Division

HSC 491   Management Skills in the Health Sciences (3) FS.

Prerequisite:  HSC 201

Presentation and discussion of current concepts and trends in the administration and management of the health sciences.  Educational/instructional methodologies.  Student projects, written and oral. 

HSC 492   Research Methods in Health Sciences (3) FS.

Prerequisite:  MAT 131 is required; CSC 101 is recommended.

Overview of research methods in health sciences, including study design, sampling, data collection and analysis, statistical techniques, and report writing.  Application of research methods to development of research proposal.  Critical analysis of literature.  Examination of relevance of data to decision making. 

HSC 494   Independent Study in Health Sciences (1-3) FS.

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

In-depth study of a health sciences topic under the supervision of a health sciences instructor.  Requires independent study contract to be completed before enrollment.  Repeatable course.

HSC 495   Special Topics in Health Sciences (1-3) FS.

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

Intensive study of a Health Sciences topic of special interest to students pursuing a career in the health professions.  Topic will vary as announced.  One to three hours of lecture per week.

HSC 496   Internship in Health Sciences (1-6) FS.

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

Students will be directed to health care facilities to serve as interns.  Regular meetings are scheduled with a faculty internship supervisor to assess student progress.  Up to forty hours per week.

HCS 498   Directed Research in Health Sciences (1-3) FS.

Prerequisites:  HSC 201 and HSC 308 or HEA 317.

Advanced topics and research on specific subjects in Health Sciences.  Topics of research to be approved and directed by an instructor.

Graduate

Graduate standing or consent of the graduate program coordinator is prerequisite to enrollment in graduate (500 level) courses.

HSC 500   Health Care Leadership and Management  (3). 

Examines the structure, management and interrelationship of health care organizations across the spectrum of care in light of classical and contemporary management theory, and provides understanding of the unique relationship within and between health care organizations and professionals.

HSC 501   Advanced Research Methods in Health Science (3).

Prerequisites:  HSC 492 or equivalent and
MAT 131 or equivalent.

Theory and practice of experimental, correlation and descriptive research.  Computer application of statistical packages to data sets.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week.

HSC 502   Principles of Epidemiology (3).

Overview of principles and methods of epidemiology and application to distribution of health and illness in society.  Examines risk factors associated with incidence and prevalence of acute and chronic diseases in diverse populations.

HSC 503   Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (3).

Study of health behaviors and evaluation of community intervention strategies for the promotion of health and prevention of disease in diverse populations.

HSC 504   Health Policy and Administration for Health Professionals (3).

Examination of current health policy issues and health care administrative practices for health professionals.  Emphasis on health care reform, managed care, case management, personnel management, financial management, the health care team, Patient Focused Care, Continuous Quality Improvement.

HSC 505   Teaching Strategies for Health Professionals (3).

Prerequisite:  HSC 500.

Study of effective teaching and evaluation methods in health sciences, including principles of teaching and learning, curriculum development, problem-based learning, competency-based outcomes assessment, group dynamics, and instructional media.

HSC 506   Critical Assessment of Health Science Literature (3).

Prerequisites:  HSC 501, or completion of HSC 492 or equivalent and MAT 131 or equivalent, and consent of instructor.

Critical assessment of health literature in terms of research methods, application of research findings, and policy implications.

HSC 507   Measurement and Assessment in Health Professions Education (3).

Prerequisite:  HSC 500

The course focuses on issues of measurement and assessment in teaching in the health professions.  Emphasis is placed on approaches to testing, types of instruments, validity, reliability, and item analysis.  Examines methods and approaches to evaluation of scientific research.

HSC 508   Ethical Issues in Health Care Management (3).

Prerequisite:  HSC 500 is recommended.

Review of ethical decision-making theories and moral principles related to health care organizational management, biomedical advances, end-of-life criteria, access to care, and the establishment, composition, and responsibilities of medical ethics committees and ethical codes of conduct.

 

HSC 509   Communication and Group Dynamics in Healthcare (3).

Prerequisite:  HSC 500 is recommended

Assists students in understanding and improving interpersonal communication skills through structured exercises in professional presentations, scientific writing, skill development in health information technologies, and interacting with health personnel and practitioners in healthcare organizations.

HSC 510   Orientation to Emergency Medicine (2).

Prerequisites:  HSC 501, HSC 502 and HSC 503.

Survey of advanced techniques and procedures required for specialty training
in emergency medicine.

HSC 511   Advanced Clinical Studies:  Emergency Medicine Residency (8).

Prerequisite:  HSC 510.

Supervised advanced training in emergency medicine in clinical management, technical and procedural skills, interpretation of diagnostic data, patient education, collegial teaching, and interpersonal communication with multicultural populations.  Rotations in specialty throughout clinical year.  Course can be repeated twice for credit.

HSC 512   Principles of Managed Care  (3).

Prerequisite:  HSC 500

Analyzes the implications to providers, consumers, and payers of managed care including the financial and operational values of capitation and other reimbursement mechanisms, medical group formation and valuation, risk assessment, and contractual issues of price, service, and payment.

HSC 513   Orientation to Cardiac Medicine and Surgery (2).

Prerequisites:  HSC 501, HSC 502 and HSC 503.

Survey of advanced techniques and procedures required for specialty training in cardiac medicine and surgery.

HSC 514   Advanced Clinical Studies:  Cardiac Medicine and Surgery Residency (8).

Prerequisite:  HSC 513.

Supervised advanced training in cardiac medicine and surgery in clinical management, technical and procedural skills, interpretation of diagnostic data, patient education, collegial teaching, and interpersonal communication with multicultural populations.  Rotations in specialty throughout clinical year.  Course can be repeated twice for credit.

HSC 515   Organizational Theory and Behavior in Health Sciences (3)

Prerequisite:  HSC 500; completion of core requirements is recommended.

Reviews organizational design, behavior and theory as an interdisciplinary approach to understanding health service organizations.  Issues of workforce diversity, organizational development, reengingeering and the use of teams to improve efficiency are analyzed.

HSC 516   Orientation to Gerontology (2).

Prerequisites:  HSC 501, HSC 502 and HSC 503.

Survey of advanced techniques and procedures required for specialty training
in gerontology.

HSC 517   Advanced Clinical Studies:  Gerontology Residency (8).

Prerequisite:  HSC 516.

Supervised advanced training in gerontology in clinical management, technical and procedural skills, interpretation of diagnostic data, patient education, collegial teaching, and interpersonal communication with multicultural populations.  Rotations in specialty throughout clinical year.  Course can be repeated twice for credit.

HSC 518   Finance and Cost Accounting (3).

Prerequisite:  HSC 500

Presents principles and perspectives of financial and cost management of profit and not-for-profit health care organizations with specific emphasis on the integration of contractual allowance, capitation management, cost-center accounting and reimbursement policy impact on financial management.

HSC 519   Orientation to Surgery (2).

Prerequisites:  HSC 501, HSC 502 and HSC 503.

Survey of advanced techniques and procedures required for specialty training
in surgery.

HSC 520   Advanced Clinical Studies:  Surgery Residency (8).

Prerequisite:  HSC 519.

Supervised advanced training in surgery in clinical management, technical and procedural skills, interpretation of diagnostic data, patient education, collegial teaching, and interpersonal communication with multicultural populations.  Rotations in specialty throughout clinical year.  Course can be repeated twice for credit.

HSC 521   Compliance, Health Law and Research (3).

Prerequisite:  HSC 500

Covers legal theories, issues, and government regulations as they pertain to management of and compliance with recognized standards of medical research and clinical trials.

HSC 522   Orientation to Pediatrics (2).

Prerequisites:  HSC 501, HSC 502 and HSC 503.

Survey of advanced techniques and procedures required for specialty training
in pediatrics.

HSC 523   Advanced Clinical Studies:  Pediatric Residency (8).

Prerequisite:  HSC 522.

Supervised advanced training in pediatrics in the areas of clinical management, technical and procedural skills, interpretation of diagnostic data, patient education, collegial teaching, and interpersonal communication with multicultural populations.  Rotations in specialty throughout clinical year.  Course can be repeated twice for credit.

HSC 524   Health Science Research and Funded Projects (3).

Prerequisite:  HSC 500

Analysis of funded research projects in the health sciences, including study design, sampling, data analysis and significance of the research proposal in preparing a grant application.  Critical analysis of the literature and identification of appropriate funding opportunities for grant projects.

HSC 525   Orientation to Neonatology (2).

Prerequisites:  HSC 501, HSC 502 and HSC 503.

Survey of advanced techniques and procedures required for specialty training
in neonatology.

HSC 526   Advanced Clinical Studies:  Neonatology Residency (8).

Prerequisite:  HSC 525.

Supervised advanced training in neonatology in clinical management, technical and procedural skills, interpretation of diagnostic data, patient education, collegial teaching, and interpersonal communication with multicultural populations.  Rotations in specialty throughout clinical year.  Course can be repeated twice for credit.

HSC 528   Orientation to Internal Medicine (2).

Prerequisites:  HSC 501, HSC 502 and HSC 503.

Survey of advanced techniques and procedures required for specialty training
in internal medicine.

HSC 529   Advanced Clinical Studies:  Internal Medicine Residency (8).

Prerequisite:  HSC 528.

Supervised advanced training in internal medicine in clinical management, technical and procedural skills, interpretation of diagnostic data, patient education, collegial teaching, and interpersonal communication with multicultural populations.  Rotations in specialty throughout clinical year.  Course can be repeated twice for credit.

HSC 530   Health Care Strategic Planning and Marketing (3).

Prerequisite:  HSC 500

Presents the principles and theoretical foundation of health care strategic and tactical planning, marketing, business development,  managed care contract maximization, and financial analysis and modeling of alternative short and long-range strategies across the continuum of health care.

HSC 531   Orientation to Family Medicine (2).

Prerequisites:  HSC 501, HSC 502 and HSC 503.

Survey of advanced techniques and procedures required for specialty training
in family medicine.

HSC 532   Advanced Clinical Studies:  Family Medicine Residency (8).

Prerequisite:  HSC 531.

Supervised advanced training in family medicine in clinical management, technical and procedural skills, interpretation of diagnostic data, patient education, collegial teaching, and interpersonal communication with multicultural populations.  Rotations in specialty throughout clinical year.  Course can be repeated twice for credit.

HSC 594   Independent Study (1-3).

Independent study, including research or field experience under supervision of a faculty member.  Independent study contract required.  Repeatable course.

HSC 595   Special Topics (1-3).

Advanced course of interest to graduate students in the health sciences.  Specific topic and content will vary as announced.  Repeatable course.

HSC 596   Practicum in Professional Studies (3).

Prerequisite:  Completion of core courses.

Fieldwork and in-depth study of a discipline related topic under the direction of Division of Health Sciences faculty member. Graded CR/NC only. Nine hours of laboratory per week.  Repeatable for credit for up to a maximum of six units. 

HSC 598   Directed Research (1).

Research on a subject related to the option which is suitable for professional presentation or publication.  Specific topic of the research must be approved and directed by an instructor.  A maximum of 2 units may be applied toward the master's degree.  Repeatable course.

HSC 599   Graduate Capstone Activity (1).

Prerequisites:  Advancement to Candidacy and completion of all core courses and HEA 598.

Writing and presentation of a research project under supervision with assigned faculty.

HSC 600   Project Continuation Course (0).

Students who have completed all coursework except HSC 599 Graduate Capstone Activity may maintain continuous attendance by enrolling in this course.  Signature of graduate coordinator is required.