Back to University Catalog 2004-2005

Recreation and Leisure Studies                            College of Health and Human Services       

Department of Kinesiology and Recreation

Bachelor of Arts

Recreation Administration Option

Therapeutic Recreation Option

Minor

Minor in Recreation and Leisure Studies

Minor in Travel and Tourism

Faculty

Mary Lou Cappel, Program Coordinator

Email:  mcappel@csudh.edu

Coordinator's Office:  SAC A-1129, (310) 243-3537

Beverly Francis, Department Secretary                                           (Physical Education and Recreation)

Department Office:  SAC A-1138, (310) 243-3761,                        FAX (310) 217-6946

 

Program Description

The Recreation and Leisure Studies Program is affiliated with the Department of Physical Education and Recreation.  It is a discipline concerned with the study and practice of the public, private and commercial service systems that provide opportunities for meaningful leisure activity.  The program offers a major, a minor and a Liberal Studies concentration.

 

Features

Students in Recreation and Leisure Studies enjoy rich opportunities for a wide variety of direct leadership and supervisory field experiences in recreation and park departments, clinical settings, hospitals, profit and non-profit organizations.  Students serve internships in recreation and park agencies, schools, child care centers, corporations, youth centers, YM/WCAs, convalescent homes, rehabilitation centers, private and state hospitals, and with private therapeutic recreation agencies.

Students selecting the General Recreation Administration option will complete the necessary course work required by the California Board of Recreation and Park Certification to apply for the Recreator Certificate.  This certificate is designed to certify that an individual is qualified by education and experience to conduct and administer recreation services.

Students selecting the Therapeutic Recreation option will complete the necessary course work required by 1) the National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification to apply for the Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist certification, and 2) the California Board of Recreation and Park Certification to apply for the Recreation Therapist certificate.  Obtaining these certificates assures the public that an individual is qualified by education and experience to conduct and administer therapeutic recreation services.

 

Academic Advisement

To obtain an advisor for the Recreation and Leisure Studies Program, contact the Recreation and Leisure Studies Coordinator
at (310) 243-3537.  Transfer students from community colleges are advised to bring a copy of their transcript and General Education Program evaluation to their first advisement meeting.

Students interested in careers in travel and tourism should contact Dr. Mary Lou Cappel regarding an appropriate advising pattern within the B.A. in Recreation and Leisure Studies.

It is important that Recreation and Leisure Studies Majors and Minors and Travel and Tourism Minors seek advisement each semester to ensure that academic goals are achieved in a timely manner.  Please adhere to the important dates listed in the University Catalog and the Class Schedule.

 

Preparation

If high school students are interested in pursuing a degree in Recreation and Leisure Studies, the department suggests taking classes in speech, arts and crafts, music, biology, computer science, and leadership.  In addition, the student might consider working part-time or volunteering at a summer camp, health club, senior citizen agency, park, playground, hospital or community center.

While studying at a community college, students should take courses in the lower division core requirements for the Recreation and Leisure Studies major.  These include courses in foundations, planning and leadership.  Also, if a student plans to work while in college, employment in a recreation or leisure services agency or
a therapeutic recreation setting is very beneficial.

 

Helpful Hints

o    Seek advisement at least twice per semester.

o    Keep the advisement file up-to-date.  Students should also maintain their own academic file.

o    Most courses are offered only once a year.  A few courses are offered every other semester.  Students must be alert to the semester in which they are offered.

o    Students should begin by first taking the lower numbered courses followed by the higher numbered courses.

o    Students should consider minoring in an area that corresponds to their career goal. 

o    Master computer competency skills that include:  word processing, spreadsheets, Power Point, and data access.

o    Join the CSU Dominguez Hills Recreation Club.

o    Join the California Park and Recreation Society (CPRS).

o    Join the Southern California Municipal Athletic Federation (SCMAF).

o    Join the California Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (CAHPERD).

o    Attend professional conferences and workshops regularly.

o    Check the Recreation and Leisure Studies bulletin boards for information related to your educational goals and job
opportunities.

o    Independent Study classes are designed for special projects or practical experiences.  See the Program Coordinator for guidelines.

o    Scholarships, awards, and honors are available for outstanding students.  Discuss these opportunities with the Program Coordinator.

 

Career Possibilities

Recreation and Leisure Studies

The Recreation and Leisure Studies Major prepares students to work as leaders, coordinators, managers, and supervisors who can manage a wide range of recreation and leisure service services.  The interdisciplinary nature of the curriculum leads to recreation career opportunities in parks, playgrounds, schools, child care centers, hospitals, youth clubs, health clubs, YM/WCAs, corporations, and commercial leisure ventures.  The commercial recreation venue, such as hotels, resorts and entertainment complexes, is a growing area for employment opportunities. The field of therapeutic recreation offers careers in hospitals, retirement and nursing homes, prisons, rehabilitation centers and the community.

The Minor in Recreation and Leisure Studies enables students to concentrate their coursework in municipal, commercial or therapeutic recreation. 

Travel and Tourism

Travel and tourism is the world's leading industry.  It is the second largest industry in the United States, where it generates more than 6 million jobs.  Over the past decade it has grown twice as fast as the average for United States industries.  Over 20 million visitors come to Los Angeles each year.  The World Tourism Organization predicts continued increase in worldwide tourism receipts, primarily from active, adventurous, nature and culture related travel that falls within the definition of ecotourism.

Major opportunities in the much multi-segmented travel industry include airlines, car rentals, bus companies, cruise lines, railroads, lodgings, restaurants, tour companies, travel agents, theme parks, sightseeing companies, and convention centers.  Corporate travel management is a major career option.  Other choices can be found in tour operations, incentive travel, meeting and convention planning, convention center management, the hospitality industry including hotels, time sharing and other innovations, the ski industry, theme parks, resorts, state and national tourism offices, trade associations, airport and aviation management, travel safety and security, and ancillary functions including travel technology, research and marketing, advertising, travel writing and photography, education and training, trade associations and travel industry law. 

The Minor in Travel and Tourism enables students to focus numerous aspects in an ever-expanding discipline.

 

Professional Organizations

Membership is encouraged in the following professional
organizations:

CSU Dominguez Hills Recreation Club

California Parks and Recreation Society (CPRS)

National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA)

Southern California Municipal Athletic Federation (SCMAF)

California Association for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (CAHPERD)

American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (AAHPERD)

American Association for Leisure and Recreation (AALR)

Women in Leisure Services

 

Graduation With Honors

An undergraduate student may be a candidate for graduation with Honors in Recreation and Leisure Studies provided he or she meets the following criteria:

1.   A minimum of 36 units in residence at CSU Dominguez Hills;

2.   A minimum grade point average of at least 3.5 in all courses used to satisfy the upper division requirements in the Recreation and Leisure Studies major.  Overall 3.0 grade point average;

3.   Submission of a Recreation and Leisure Studies Honors Application form to the Coordinator of the Recreation and Leisure  program;

4.   Recommendation by the Recreation and Leisure Studies faculty.

 

Bachelor of Arts in Recreation and Leisure Studies

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree

See the "Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree" in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements.  A minimum of 40 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division. 

 

Elective Requirements

Completion of elective courses (beyond the requirements listed below) to reach a total of a minimum of 120 units.

 

General Education Requirements (54-60 units)

See the "General Education" requirements in the University Catalog or the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education requirements and course offerings.

 

United States History, Constitution and American Ideals Requirement (6 units)

See the "United States History, Constitution, and American Ideals" requirements in the University Catalog.  Courses used to satisfy this requirement do not apply to General Education .

 

Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement

See the "Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement" in the University Catalog.

 

Major Requirements (52-63 units)

Students must select one of the options listed.  The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required of all candidates for this degree.  Coursework in both options meets the educational requirements to apply for the Recreator Certificate by the California Board of Recreation and Park Certification.

Common Core Requirements (33 units)

 

A.  Lower Division Required Courses (12 units)

REC 120.    Foundations of Recreation and Leisure Services (3)

REC 124.    Leadership in Recreation and Leisure Services (3)

REC 220.    Recreation Group Activities (3)

REC 225.    Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation (3)

 

B.  Upper Division Required Courses (21 units)

REC 331.    Programming for Leisure Services (3)

REC 334.    Therapeutic Recreation and Gerontology (3)

REC 335.    Management of Recreation and Leisure Services (3)

REC 428.    Conference and Event Planning (3)

REC 440.    Legal and Financial Aspects of Leisure Services (3)

REC 490.    Seminar in Leisure Studies (3)               

REC 493.    Directed Field Experience
in Recreation and Leisure Services (3)

 

In addition to the Common Core Requirements, students must select one of the options listed below:

 

Recreation Administration Option (52 units)

Single field major - no minor required

A.  Common Core Requirements (33 units)

B.  Lower Division Required Course (1 unit)

REC 260.      Outdoor Education (1)

C.  Upper Division Required Courses (9 units)

PED 302.      Technology Methods in Physical Education and Recreation (3)

REC 420.      Recreation Services for the Urban Community (3)

REC 438.      Commercial Recreation (3)

D.  Electives (9 units):  Select three additional courses from Communications, Physical Education, Psychology, Recreation and Leisure Studies, or Sociology.

 

Therapeutic Recreation Option (63 units)

Single field major - no minor required

Meets the educational requirements to apply for certification by the California Board of Recreation and Park Certification, and the National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification.

A.  Common Core Requirements (33 units)

 

B.  Lower Division Required Course (3 units)

BIO 250.       Elements of Human Anatomy and Physiology (3)

C.  Upper Division Required Courses (15 units)

REC 425.      Contemporary Issues in Therapeutic Recreation (3)

REC 445.      Recreation Therapy Treatment and Procedures (3)

REC 496.      Internship in Therapeutic Recreation (6)

PSY 363.       The Abnormal Personality (3)

D.  Electives (12 units):  Select four upper division Sociology and/or Psychology courses with the assistance of an advisor.  Classes must be pre-approved to meet certification standards.

 

 

Minor in Recreation and Leisure Studies (15 units)

Select five courses (15 units) upon advisement (a maximum of six lower division units may apply toward the minor).  Minor areas may concentrate in management of leisure services, therapeutic recreation, commercial or recreation programming.

 

Minor in Travel and Tourism (15 units)

REC 348       Principles of Travel and Tourism (3)

REC 428       Conference and Event Planning (3)

REC 438       Commercial Recreation (3)

REC 448       Hotel and Resort Management (3)

REC 490       Seminar in Leisure Studies (3)

Course Offerings 

The credit value for each course in semester units is indicated for each term by a number in parentheses following the title.  Departments may indicate the term in which they expect to offer the course by
the use of:  “F” (fall), “S” (spring) or “EOY” (every other year).

 

Lower Division

REC 100   Dimensions of Leisure (3) FS. 

Investigation of leisure, recreation, and personal and social adjustments to leisure. Examination of use and misuse of leisure.  Students develop personal philosophy of recreation and increase awareness of impact of leisure on American society. 

REC 120   Foundations of Recreation and Leisure Services (3) S. 

History and philosophy of recreation and insights of the recreation profession. Discussion of goals and ideologies of current trends in leisure. Overview of management principles. 

REC 124   Leadership in Recreation and Leisure Services (3) F. 

Analysis of basic knowledge and skills required for recreation leaders, in the camping, parks, and community recreation settings. Emphasis on individual leadership methods, styles, and motivation.

REC 126   American Sign Language (3) FS. 

Introduction to basic  sign language structure with emphasis on acquisition of receptive and  expressive finger spelling and basic work survival signs. Course meets related  coursework requirements for recreation therapy certification.  Repeatable course.

REC 220   Recreation Group Activities (3) F. 

Development of skills needed to organize and lead group games, crafts, non-traditional and gender-fair activities, storytelling, social recreation, festivals, and special events.  Emphasis placed on team building, group management and evaluation.  Community service projects provide practical experience.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.

REC 225   Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation  (3) F.  

Survey course  which examines recreation needs of special populations such as the mentally,  physically, sensory or emotionally impaired. Required of prospective  recreation therapists.

REC 260   Outdoor Education (1) F. 

Introduction to outdoor education activities including camping, hiking, backpacking, environmental discovery and selected outdoor survival skills. Emphasis on leadership techniques, group dynamics, team building activities, program planning and evaluation.  Field trips required.  Two hours of activity per week.

 

Upper Division

REC 326   American Sign Language II (3) FS.

Prerequisite:  REC 126 or equivalent.

Designed for those who possess the basic skills of manual communication.  Further instruction in the development of grammar, sign vocabulary, finger spelling, and conversational signing skills.  Recommended for elementary, secondary special education teachers, recreation therapists, and social services personnel.  Repeatable for credit. 

REC 331   Programming for Leisure Services (3) F. 

Prerequisites:  REC 120 and REC  124 are recommended.

Principles and procedures of planning recreation and leisure service programs
for various age groups in specific settings.  Examination of budgeting, personnel, and facilities to implement programs for diverse populations.

REC 334   Therapeutic Recreation and Gerontology (3) F.

Prerequisite: REC 225 or consent of instructor.

Role of therapeutic recreation  specialist with emphasis on leisure awareness, social interaction skills,  leisure activity skills, and leisure resources, as they relate to the field  of gerontology.

REC 335   Management of Recreation and Leisure Services (3) F.  

Prerequisites: REC 120 and REC 124 are recommended.

Basic theories of the supervision and management of employees in the recreation and leisure services profession.  Examination of structure and governance of organizations.  Emphasis on staff development, motivation, evaluation, training, problem solving, and public relations.

REC 348   Principles of Travel and Tourism (3)

Study of historical and modern principles of travel and tourism.  Exploration of societal trends, global tourist behavior, and environmental factors influencing the destination mix.  Investigation of tourism planning, promotion. 

REC 420   Recreation Services for the Urban Community (3) S. 

Prerequisites: REC 331 and REC 335. 

Examination of the demographics, values, social problems and resources of the urban community with relevance to the recreation professional.  Implications for providing recreation services to culturally diverse populations.  Field trips are required. 

REC 425   Contemporary Issues in Therapeutic Recreation (3). 

Prerequisites: REC 225 and REC 334. 

Investigation and analysis of current trends and problems associated with the delivery of therapeutic recreation services.  Includes an examination of professional ethics, standards of practice, referral systems, assessment instruments, and research related to therapeutic recreation.  Meets state and national certification criteria. 

REC 426   American Sign Language III (3). 

Prerequisites:  REC 126  and REC 326 or equivalent. 

Advanced instruction in the development of sign vocabulary, finger spelling, fluency, receptive and expressive skills.  Emphasis is placed on advanced grammatical syntax and extended conversational skills.  Recommended for elementary, secondary, and special education teachers, recreation therapists, and social services personnel.  Repeatable for credit. 

REC 428   Conference and Event Planning (3) S. 

Prerequisites:  REC 331, REC 335 or consent
of instructor. 

Provides approaches and procedures for effective planning and conducting professional workshops, conferences, and special

events.  Emphasis on gaining skills to organize, market, implement and evaluate conferences and special events.  Practical experience is provided. 

REC 438   Commercial Recreation (3).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Study of the nature and function of local and national commercial recreation industry such as sports and fitness facilities, entertainment centers, retail sales and manufacturing.  Examines the history, economic concepts, trends, and entrepreneurial strategies.  Emphasis on starting the commercial recreation enterprise and financial management. 

REC 440   Legal and Financial Aspects of Leisure Services (3) S.  

Prerequisites: REC 120 and REC 124  are recommended.

Emphasis on budget analysis, contracts, legal terminology, liability and litigation in the recreation and leisure services profession.

REC 445   Recreation Therapy Treatment and Procedures (3).  

Prerequisites: REC 225 and REC 334.

Theory and application of recreation  therapy treatment procedures including leadership and management styles  used in clinical and community therapeutic recreation. The course will include progress reporting and monitoring of all relevant criteria  involved with treatment. 

REC 448   Hotel and Resort Management (3). 

Prerequisites:  REC 335 is required; REC 331 is recommended. 

Investigation of management in the hospitality industry with emphasis on food service, lodging, tourism, and contemporary issues.  Examines customer service, international markets, human resources, marketing, and fiscal implications.  Field trips required. 

REC 456   American Sign Language IV (3). 

Prerequisites:  REC 226, REC 326, REC 426 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. 

A continuation of REC 426, with application of advanced sign language skills.  Includes active participation in discussion groups utilizing extended conversational skills and interaction with the deaf population. 

REC 490   Senior Seminar in Leisure Services (3) S.  

Prerequisites: REC 331 and REC 335 or consent of instructor.

Discussion of planning, managing, and marketing leisure service operations.  Preparation and evaluation of student portfolios, practice for interviewing, demonstration of facilitating groups, and investigation of career opportunities.  Three hours of seminar per week.