Back to University Catalog 2004-2005

English                          College of Liberal Arts                                Department of English

Bachelor of Arts

Language and Linguistics Option

Literature Option

Minors

English

Language and Linguistics

Subject Matter Preparation Program

English

Communications Option

Literature Option

Theater Arts Option

Teaching of English as a Second Language (TESL)

Master of Arts

Literature Option

  Rhetoric and Composition Emphasis

Teaching of English as a Second Language (TESL) Option

Certificates

Rhetoric and Composition - Graduate

Teaching of English as a Second Language (TESL) - Graduate

 

Faculty

Cyril Edward Zoerner, III, Department Chair

Andrea White, Vanessa Wenzell, Graduate Program Coordinators

Timothy Chin, Larry Ferrario, Lois Feuer, Thomas J. Giannotti, Jr., Jon Hauss, Irene McKenna, Burckhard Mohr, Helen Oesterheld, Michael R. Shafer, David Sherman,  Marilyn P. Sutton , Molly Youngkin

Department Office:  LCH  E-315, (310) 243-3322

Emeriti Faculty

Lila B. Geller, Joyce Johnson, Violet L. Jordain, C. Michael Mahon, Hal Marienthal, David B. Rankin, Abe C. Ravitz, James Riddell, Ephriam Sando, Lyle E. Smith, Walter Wells, Agnes A. Yamada

 

Program Description and Features

Bachelor of Arts

As a major, English offers a varied and soundly based program that unifies the study of composition, language, and literature. 
It prepares the student for a career in business, communications media, teaching, and for advanced study in graduate and professional schools.  It is truly a versatile major.

Within the English major, students may concentrate their programs of study in either literature or in language and linguistics.

Our programs seek to develop skills applicable not only to all professional disciplines but also to significant tasks of life: the ability to read perceptively, write effectively and think critically.  The senior seminar, English 490: Seminar in Literature, offers an integrative experience in which students work not only toward the fullest development of their skills as readers, writers and thinkers, but also toward their development as professional scholars.

Both undergraduate and graduate programs are offered during the day and in the evenings so that students may expect to complete the master of arts or the undergraduate major by attending either day or evening classes exclusively.

Students may prepare for a career in teaching English at the secondary level (junior high or high school) by completing an approved "Subject Matter Preparation Program."  Completion of such a program is the first step in meeting the state requirements for a teaching credential.  As the program requirements for the "Subject Matter Preparation Program" in English have changed recently, interested students should consult the departmentally designated advisor for current information.

Master of Arts

The program leading to the Master of Arts Degree in English
is a 30-semester-unit curriculum.  Opportunities for emphasis
in British literature, American literature, English language and linguistics, rhetoric and composition, and Teaching English as
a Second Language exist in a flexible curriculum.

The Master of Arts in English prepares students for doctoral degrees or for community college teaching positions.  The concentration in rhetoric and composition specifically prepares students to teach composition at the community college level;
it also improves the instructional skills of in-service teachers of English in the secondary schools.  Many students have discovered that work on both the undergraduate and graduate levels has provided them with the skills that enable them to succeed
in business, industry, and the professions.

Within the graduate program leading to the Master of Arts, students may choose to complete a concentration in either the Teaching of English as a Second Language (TESL) or Rhetoric and Composition.  Graduate students also may elect to do all of their work in the study of literature.  The program is designed carefully to offer both breadth and depth and will give students
a solid understanding of their discipline.

 

Academic Advisement

All of the full-time faculty serve as academic advisors.  Students may either choose their own advisors, or they may be assigned to advisors. Students who would like to be assigned to an advisor should come to the department office for assistance.

Students are urged to see an advisor upon admission, upon completion of 60 semester units, and during the first semester of their senior year.   Academic advisors may refer their students to other student services when appropriate.

 

Preparation

Four years of high school college-preparatory English courses must have been completed in partial fulfillment of the admission requirements of The California State University.

 

Graduation with Honors

Undergraduate students who have met the following criteria will be awarded departmental honors at graduation:

1.   A minimum of 36 units in residence at CSU Dominguez Hills;

2.   An overall grade point average of 3.6 for upper-division courses taken for the major in English at CSUDH.

 

Bachelor of Arts in English

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree

See the "Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree" in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements.  A minimum of 40 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division. 

 

Elective Requirements

Completion of elective courses (beyond the requirements listed below) to reach a total of a minimum of 120 units.

 

General Education Requirements (54-60 units)

See the "General Education" requirements in the University Catalog or the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education requirements and course offerings.

 

United States History, Constitution                                  and American Ideals Requirement (6 units)

See the "United States History, Constitution, and American Ideals" requirements in the University Catalog.  Courses used to satisfy this requirement do not apply to General Education .

 

Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement

See the "Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement" in the University Catalog.

 

Minor Requirements

Students completing this major will need to select a minor.  Literature-option students may minor in Language and Linguistics; Language and Linguistics option students may minor in English.

 

Major Requirements (33-39 units)

Students must select one of the options listed.  The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required of all candidates for this degree.

Literature Option (39 units)

A.  Recommended Course

ENG 230.      Appreciation of Literature (3)

 

B.  Required Course  (3 units)

ENG 307.      Practice in Literary Criticism (3)

NOTE:  ENG 307.  Practice in Literary Criticism  (3) must be taken before nine units  in the major are completed.

C.  Required Courses  (15 units)

ENG 302.      English Literature to 1642 (3)

ENG 303.      English Literature: 1642-1832 (3)

ENG 304.      English Literature:  1832-present (3)

ENG 340.      American Literature to 1865 (3)

ENG 341.      American Literature: 1865-present (3)

 

D.  Select one course from the following  (3 units):

ENG 343.      African American Poetry and Drama

ENG 344.      African American Prose (3)

ENG 347.      Literature of Ethnicity and Gender  (3)

 

E.   Select one course from the following  (3 units):

ENG 314.      English Syntax:  Traditional (3)

ENG 315.      English Syntax:  Generative-Transformational (3)

ENG 413.      History of the English Language (3)

ENG 414.      American English (3)

 

F.   Select one course from the following  (3 units):

ENG 325.      Poetry (3)

ENG 326.      Prose Fiction (3)

ENG 327.      Drama (3)

 

G.  Select one course from the following  (3 units):

ENG 465.      Chaucer (3)

ENG 467.      Shakespeare (3) 

ENG 468.      Milton (3)

 

H.  Required Course  (3 units)

ENG 490.      Seminar in Literature (3)

 

I.    Select two additional upper division courses in English with the assistance of an advisor  (6 units).

 

Language and Linguistics Option (33 units)

A.  Upper Division Required Courses  (24 units) 

ENG 305.      Critical Reading of  Literature  (3)

ENG 310.      The Study of Language (3)

ENG 311.      Phonology (3)

ENG 312.      Morphology (3)

ENG 315.      English Syntax:  Generative-Transformational (3)

ENG 413.      History of the English Language (3) or

ENG 414.    American English (3)

ENG 420.      Linguistic Analysis (3)

ENG 492.      Seminar in Linguistics (3)

B.  Select three additional upper division English courses with the assistance of an advisor (9 units).

 

Minor in English (15 units)

A.  Required Course (3 units)

ENG 307.      Practice in Literary Criticism (3)

 

B.  Select two courses from the following (6 units):

ENG 302.      English Literature to 1642 (3)

ENG 303.      English Literature: 1642-1832 (3)

ENG 304.      English Literature:  1832-present (3)

ENG 340.      American Literature to 1865 (3)

ENG 341.      American Literature:  1865-present (3)

 

C.  Select two upper division English courses with the assistance of an advisor (6 units). 

NOTE:  ENG 305 and ENG 350 may not count toward the minor.

Minor in Language and Linguistics (15 units)

A.  Recommended Course

ENG 310.      The Study of Language (3)

 

B.  Upper Division Required Courses  (15 units)

ENG 311.      Phonology (3)

ENG 312.      Morphology (3)

ENG 315.      English Syntax:  Generative-Transformational (3)

ENG 420.      Linguistic Analysis (3)

ENG 492.      Seminar in Linguistics (3)

Subject Matter Preparation Program in English (51 units)

The Subject Matter Preparation Program in English is designed for students interested in a career in teaching English at the secondary school level.  This program satisfies the requirements set by the State Commission on Teacher Credentialing for demonstrating substantive preparation in the subject matter field of English. Completion of this approved program or passing a comprehensive examination in English fulfills one part of the requirements leading to the Single Subject Teaching Credential in English.  While the Subject Matter Preparation Program in English is not itself an academic major, the program can become a major with the addition of course work that would bring the unit count to that of the major in English (Literature option).  Students interested in pursuing a teaching career at the secondary level should meet regularly with their departmental advisors.

This program requires completion of a core of 36 upper division units selected from the following list and 15 upper division units in one of the following areas:  Communications, Literature, the Teaching of English as a Second Language, or Theater Arts.

 

Lower Division Core Requirements 

      The following courses must be completed prior to taking upper division courses:

ENG 110.      Freshman Composition I (3)

ENG 111.      Freshman Composition II (3)

 

Upper Division Core Requirements  (36 units)

1.   Composition (6 units)

ENG 350.        Advanced Composition (3)

Select one course from the following:

ENG 451.        Creative Writing (3)

ENG 457.        Advanced Composition for Teachers (3)

2.   Language/Linguistics (6 units)

ENG 314.        English Syntax (3)

ENG 487.        Introduction to Second Language Learning and Teaching (3)

3.   Literature (24 units)

Required Courses (15 units)

ENG 307.        Practice in Literary Criticism (3)

ENG 325.        Poetry (3)

ENG 435.        Readings in World Literature (3)

ENG 467.        Shakespeare (3)

ENG 485.        Studies in Literature,
Composition, & Reading (3)

Select one course from the following (3 units):

ENG 302.        English Literature to 1642 (3)

ENG 303.        English Literature: 1642-1832 (3)

ENG 304.        English Literature:  1832-present (3)

Select one course from the following (3 units):

ENG 340.        American Literature to 1865 (3)

ENG 341.        American Literature:  1865-present (3)

Select one course from the following (3 units):

ENG 343.        African-American Poetry and Drama (3)

ENG 344.        African-American Prose (3)

ENG 347.        Literature of Ethnicity and Gender (3)

 

4.   In addition to the courses listed above, students must also complete the following requirements on assessment of subject matter competence:

  Submission of a portfolio of their assignments in literature, composition, and language and linguistics and from their option.

  An interview with a panel of faculty members from the English Department and from the department in which the option was completed.  This panel will certify final completion of the Subject-Matter Preparation Program in English.

  Additional information on assessment of subject-matter                   competence is available in the English Department Office.

In addition to the core requirements listed above, one of the following options must also be completed:  communications, literature, TESL, or theatre arts.

If you choose the Literature option or if you take one upper division English course in addition to the 12 courses listed in the core, you will have the necessary courses for a major in English. 

The Communications option, the Teaching of English as a Second Language option, and the Theater Arts option may be counted as a minor. 

Undergraduate students who select the Literature option will need a minor for graduation.

Communications Option (15 units)

COM 250.    Newswriting for the Media (3)

COM 302.    Law of the Mass Media (3)

COM 352.    Feature and Critical Writing (3)

COM 358.    Communications Graphics (3)

COM 381.    Scriptwriting for the Electronic Media (3)

 

Literature Option (15 units)

Required Courses (9 units)

ENG 306.      Backgrounds of Western Literature (3)

ENG 326.      Prose Fiction  (3)

ENG 327.      Drama (3)

Select one course from the following not previously selected
to satisfy the core requirements (3 units):

ENG 302.      English Literature to 1642 (3)

ENG 303.      English Literature: 1642-1832(3)

ENG 304.      English Literature:  1832-present (3)

Select one course from the following not previously selected to satisfy the core requirements (3 units):

ENG 340.      American Literature to 1865 (3)

ENG 341.      American Literature:  1865-present (3)

 

Teaching of English
as a Second Language Option (15 units)

Required Courses:

ENG 310.      The Study of Language (3)

ENG 317.      Sociolinguistics:  Black English (3)

ENG 420.      Linguistic Analysis (3)

ENG 486.      Studies in Language and Literature (TESL) (3)

ENG 492.      Seminar in Linguistics (3)

 

Theater Arts Option (15 units)

Required Courses (12 units)

THE 322.      Oral Interpretation of Literature (3)

THE 337.      Creative Dramatics (3)                            

THE 353.      Playwriting (3)                         

THE 374.      Directing and Stage Management (3)

 

Select one course from the following (3 units):

THE 355.      World Theatre I (3)

THE 357.      World Theatre II (3) 

 

Master of Arts in English 

Admission Requirements

All applicants to the MA in English must follow all application and admission procedures outlined in the university graduate application booklet.

In addition to the materials submitted to the Admissions Office under the requirements outlined in the application booklet, a transcript of all undergraduate and graduate work should be sent directly to the English Department.   To be admitted to the program, the applicant must have earned a baccalaureate degree from an accredited university or college and a grade point average of 3.00 or better in the last 60 semester units of upper division course work attempted (not including extension units).  Applicants with majors other than English may be accepted into the program but should expect to do additional work to gain the background necessary for success in their graduate courses.

Program Requirements

A.  Prerequisites and Admission to Classified Standing

1.   Graduate standing and the consent of the department chair are prerequisites to enrollment in graduate English classes.

2.  Graduate students must take the Graduate Exercise, a diagnostic test designed to assess their strengths and weaknesses, in the first semester of their graduate program so that ways to remove the deficiencies may be prescribed in time to benefit the students. 

3.   For admission to classified standing, students must have completed nine units of graduate English (500-level) courses at CSU Dominguez Hills with an average of “B” or better.  For advancement to candidacy, students must have attained classified standing and have completed nine additional graduate units in English with an average of “B” or better,
in addition to having passed the Graduate Exercise.

B.  Graduation Requirements

1.   Each student’s program must be approved by the graduate coordinator.  No more than nine units selected from upper division undergraduate offerings in English may count toward the master’s degree in English. 

2.   Graduate students who pass the Graduate Exercise in literature will have satisfied the graduation writing assessment requirement. Students who take the Graduate Exercise in language and linguistics must earn a score of eight or better on the Graduation Writing Examination (GWE) or earn a grade of “B” or better in one of the certifying writing courses at CSU Dominguez Hills.

3.   To complete assessment of subject matter competence, Literature and Rhetoric/Composition program graduate students who have earned 15-21 units must: (i) revise their passing Graduate Exercises, lengthening them with writing that shows learning gains; and (ii) participate in an interview with members of the Graduate Committee who will communicate their assessment of the revisions and consult with the student about subsequent work in the program.

4.   In addition to successful completion of required coursework, all candidates must submit a Final Project, a work (maximum of 35 pages) investigating a linguistic or literary subject. 

5.   Students must complete all requirements for the M.A. within seven years.

6.   In addition to the major requirements, students must meet all university requirements for the master’s degree.  Students should consult the section of the catalog entitled “Requirements for the Master’s Degree.”

7.  A reading knowledge of at least one foreign language is a valuable research and teaching tool.  While a formal foreign language requirement is not part of this program, those planning to pursue a Ph.D. in English should prepare themselves to meet the doctoral requirement calling for reading ability in two foreign languages.

 

Literature Option (30 units)

The Master of Arts in English is a degree in literature, the heart
of the discipline. The program provides for both breadth and depth in the study of literature.

Students may choose to do all of their work in literature or may elect an emphasis in Rhetoric and Composition.

A.  Prerequisites

1.   ENG 307.        Practice in Literary Criticism (3)

ENG 490.        Seminar in Literature  (3) or

                        Any single-author course.

2.   Select three courses from the following:

ENG 302.        English Literature to 1642 (3)

ENG 303.        English Literature: 1642-1832 (3)

ENG 304.        English Literature:  1832-present (3)

ENG 340.        American Literature to 1865  (3)

ENG 341.        American Literature:  1865-Present  (3)

 

B.  Required Courses  (6 units)

ENG  501.     Advanced Studies in Literature (3)

ENG  545.     Literary Criticism  (3)

 

C.  Select one course from the following (3 units):

ENG 530.      Seminar:  Studies in Medieval Literature (3)

ENG 535.      Seminar:  Studies in Renaissance Literature (3)

 

D.  Select one course from the following (3 units):

ENG 540.      Seminar:  Studies in Restroration and Eighteenth-Century Literature (3)

ENG 543.      Seminar:  Studies in Romantic Literature 
(1789-1832)  (3)

ENG 546.      Seminar:  Studies in Victorian Literature 
(1832-1901)  (3)

ENG 552.      Seminar:  Studies in American Literature 
(1836-1917)  (3)

E.   Select one course from the following  (3 units):

ENG 549.      Seminar:  Studies in Modern British Literature  (3)

ENG 555.      Seminar:  Studies in Modern American Literature  (3)

 

F.   Select five additional courses in English (15 units)*.

 

G.  Final Project

 

Rhetoric and Composition Emphasis*

The emphasis in Rhetoric and Composition is a specially designed program for students who plan to teach writing at the secondary or community college level.   Students may be offered the opportunity to gain practical experience by working as tutors in the writing program.  Students who choose this emphasis are required to take the "Required Courses" listed below to satisfy Section F.

A.  Required Courses  (15 units)

ENG  570.     Seminar in Writing (3)

ENG  571.     Discourse Analysis (3)

ENG  575.     The Teaching of Composition (3)

ENG  576.     History and Theories of Rhetoric (3)

ENG  577.     Current Issues in Rhetoric and Composition (3)

 

 

Teaching of English as a Second Language (TESL) Option (30 units)

The Master of Arts in English Option in the Teaching of English as a Second Language (TESL) is a 30-unit program  of study designed for graduate students planning careers in TESL/TEFL at the secondary school or college level in this country or abroad. This program combines upper division and graduate level course work in English and linguistics.

A.  Prerequisites

1.   Required Prerequisite Courses

ENG 311.        Phonology  (3)

ENG 312.        Morphology  (3)

ENG 315.        English Syntax:  Generative-Transformational  (3)

2.   A minimum of one year’s work in a foreign language.

B.  Required Courses (30 units)

ENG 513.      History of English (3)

ENG 514.      American English (3)

ENG 582.      Linguistic Analysis  (3)

ENG 583.      Psycholinguistics  (3) or

ENG 584.    Sociolinguistics  (3)

ENG 585.      Second Language Acquisition  (3)

ENG 586.      Teaching Language and Literature
in the ESL Context  (3)

ENG 587.      Current Issues in TESL/Applied Linguistics  (3)

ENG 588.      Pedagogical Grammar for TESOL  (Teaching of English to Speakers of Other Languages)  (3)

ENG 592.      Topics in Linguistics:  Linguistics Theory (3)

ENG 593.      Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (3) [I]

[I] = course  is infrequently offered

 

C.  A passing score on Comprehensive Examinations.

D.  Select a practicum with the prior approval of the TESL Coordinator.

 

Certificate in Rhetoric and Composition (15 units)

The Certificate in Rhetoric and Composition is a program that may be taken with or apart from any degree program or major. Many students who have completed graduate degrees have found this certificate program both exciting and helpful.  The following courses must be completed for this certificate.  Candidates must maintain a grade point average of 3.0 or better in the program.

ENG  570.     Seminar in Writing (3)

ENG 571.      Discourse Analysis (3)

ENG  575.     The Teaching of Composition (3)

ENG  576.     History and Theories of Rhetoric (3)

ENG  577.     Current Issues in Rhetoric and Composition (3)

 

Certificate in the Teaching of English as a Second Language (TESL) (24 units)

The Certificate in the Teaching of English as a Second Language (TESL) is a post-baccalaureate program of study designed for teachers and prospective teachers seeking competence in the teaching of English to speakers of other languages.  The program combines upper division and graduate courses in English, linguistics and education.  Courses completed as part of other programs of study may be applicable toward the certificate.  Candidates must maintain a grade point average of 3.0 or better in the program.

A.  Prerequisites

1.   Required Prerequisite

ENG 310.        The Study of Language  (3) 

2.   An acceptable baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution and a grade point average of 2.5 or better over the last 60 semester units attempted.

3.   A minimum of one year’s work in a foreign language.

 

B.  Required Courses (24 units) 

ENG 311.      Phonology (3)

ENG 312.      Morphology (3)

ENG 315.      English Syntax:  Generative-Transformational (3)

ENG 420.      Linguistic Analysis (3) or

                      A course in contrastive analysis or

ENG 582.    Seminar:  Linguistics Analysis  (3)

ENG 492.      Seminar in Linguistics (3) or

ENG 592.    Seminar:  Topics in Linguistics  (3)

ENG 419.      Psycholinguistics (3) or

ENG 583.    Seminar:  Psycholinguistics (3)

ENG 486.      Studies in Language and Literature (TESL) (3) or

ENG 586.    Teaching Language and Literature
in the ESL Context (3)

ENG 585.      Second-Language Acquisitions (3)

 

C.  Select a practicum with the prior approval of the TESL Coordinator.

 

Course Offerings

The credit value for each course in semester units is indicated for each term by a number in parentheses following the title.  Departments may indicate the term in which they expect to offer the course by the use of:  “F” (fall), “S” (spring) or “EOY” (every other year).

 

Non-Baccalaureate

ENG 088   Developmental Reading (3) FS. 

(no baccalaureate credit) 

Intensive work in basic reading and writing skills with emphasis on college-level reading and writing.  CSU English Placement Test scores of T-141 or below are required to complete this course prior to enrolling in ENG 110.  May be taken concurrently with ENG 099.  Graded CR/NC. 

ENG 099   Basic Writing Workshop (3) FS.

(no baccalaureate credit)

English Placement Test T-scores of T-150 or lower.  Focus on clear, correct sentences, with an introduction to paragraphing in the context of the essay.  Essays concentrate on narrative and personal experience leading to critical exposition.  May be taken concurrently with ENG 088.  Graded CR/NC. 

Lower Division

ENG 110   Freshman Composition I (3) FS.

Prerequisite: English Placement Test T-score above 150 or EPT T-score of 141 or below and ENG 088 and 099 or EPT T-score ranging from T-142 to T-150 and ENG 099.

Basic writing skills emphasizing analytic exposition and expression of ideas and information.  Graded A-C/NC.

ENG 111   Freshman Composition II (3) FS.

Prerequisite: ENG 110 or equivalent.

Reinforcement of basic writing skills with emphasis on persuasion and argumentation, including a documented essay. Aids in writing convincing arguments and assembling, organizing, and documenting evidence supporting a thesis. Graded A-C/NC. 

ENG 230   Appreciation of Literature (3) FS.

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Ways of reading literature to enhance understanding, appreciation, and enjoyment.  Requires frequent writing assignments. 

ENG 271   Writers’ Workshop (3) S. 

Prerequisites:  ENG 110 and ENG 111 or their equivalents.

Experiences in creative writing through encounters with selected literary works.

Upper Division

ENG 302   English Literature to 1642 (3) FS.

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Survey of British poetry, drama, and prose to 1642.

ENG 303   English Literature: 1642-1832 (3) FS.

Prerequisite: ENG 111.

Survey of British poetry, drama, and prose, 1642-1832.

ENG 304   English Literature: 1832 -Present (3) FS.

Prerequisite: ENG 111.

Survey of British poetry, drama, and prose, 1832-present.

ENG 305    Critical Reading of Literature (3). 

Prerequisite:  ENG 111. 

Analysis of literature to develop critical reading skills.  Intended for students in Liberal Studies and Linguistics; may not be counted toward major/minor in English with Literature option.  Written exercises required. 

ENG 306   Backgrounds of Western Literature (3) FS.

Prerequisite: ENG 111.

Analysis of Old and New Testaments, Greek and Roman myths, and literature based on these.  Recommended for Spanish and French majors.

ENG 307   Practice in Literary Criticism (3) FS.

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Practice in literary criticism from contemporary theoretical perspectives.  For Literature majors and minors in English.  Written exercises regularly required.

ENG 308   Critical Approaches to Children’s Literature (3) FS.

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Critical approaches to children's literature with emphasis on topics such as history, genre, style, and image.  Course may cover works through adolescent literature. 

ENG 310   The Study of Language (3)

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Traditional and modern approaches to the study of language.  Fundamentals of phonology and grammar.  (Same as FRE 310.) 

ENG 311   Phonology (3) F.

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

The phonetics of a variety of languages and the phonetic phenomena that occur in natural languages.  Practice in the perception and transcription of such phenomena. Introduction to the traditional and current views of phonological theory. 

ENG 312   Morphology (3) S.

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Descriptive and historical (etymological) analysis of the structure of words in English and other languages:  common roots, base forms, and affixes; rules of word formation; semantic change. 

ENG 314   English Syntax:  Traditional   (3) FS.

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

The structure and meaning of sentences, approached through traditional models of grammar; the role of syntax in writing and composition.

ENG 315.  English Syntax:  Generative-Transformational (3).

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

The structure and meaning of sentences, approached through the generative-transformational model of grammar; the role of syntax in writing and composition. 

ENG 317   Sociolinguistics: Black English (3) S.

Prerequisite: ENG 111.

The linguistic features and the social, cultural, and historical background of Black English, with an emphasis on how it relates to other English dialects and its educational implications. 

ENG 325   Poetry (3) FS.

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Analysis of various forms of poetry, with an emphasis on American and British writers from various eras. Written exercises required.

ENG 326   Prose Fiction (3) FS.

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Forms of prose fiction from different periods and national literatures.  Written exercises required.

ENG 327   Drama (3) FS.

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Forms of drama by major playwrights from different periods and national literatures.  Written exercises required.

ENG 340   American Literature to 1865 (3) FS.

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Intensive study of selected American works. 

ENG 341   American Literature: 1865-Present (3) FS.

Prerequisite: ENG 111.

Intensive study of selected American works. 

ENG 343   African-American Poetry and Drama (3) S.

Prerequisite: ENG 111.

Historical development of African-American poetry from its roots.  Study of major twentieth-century African-American plays.  Focus on poetry and drama as media informing particular aspects and textures of the Black American experience. 

ENG 344   African-American Prose (3) F. 

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Selected African-American works of fiction and non-fiction. Analysis of themes, techniques and symbols.  Special attention given to folkloric elements; i.e., blues, dozens, folktales, etc., as they are employed in the literature. 

ENG 347   Literature of Ethnicity and Gender  (3)

Prerequisite:  ENG 111

Readings in such areas as Latino American, Asian American, and women's literature.  Topic will vary.  May be repeated up to six units for the major or minor in English. 

ENG 350   Advanced Composition (3) FS.

Prerequisite: ENG 111 or equivalent.

Rhetorical modes, techniques of emphasis, strategies of editing and revising.  May not be counted toward major/minor or M.A. in English except for teacher candidates; may count only twice toward elective credit.  Satisfies graduation competency-in-writing requirement.  Graded A-C/NC.  Repeatable course.  Fee required.

ENG 351   Composition for Elementary School Teachers (3)

Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the GWAR.

Advanced writing course.  Focus on children’s writing development, writing process and techniques for teaching composition, and further development of writing abilities of prospective elementary school teachers. 

ENG 352   Writing and Speaking Skills ­­­­­for Management (3) FS.

Prerequisites:  ENG 111 and satisfying the junior level competency in writing requirement: GWE (score of 7 or better) or certification writing course such as ENG 350.

Principles and skills of effective communication within organizational management.  This course concentrates on eliciting desired responses through various types of business communication in writing.  May be counted only once toward major/minor and twice for elective credit.  Graded A-C/NC. Repeatable course. 

ENG 413   History of the English Language (3) F.

Prerequisite: ENG 111.

The evolution of English from its Indo-European origins, through Old and Middle English, to the rise and spread of Modern English.

ENG 414   American English (3) F.

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

American English from colonial times to the present.  Contacts with native, colonial, and immigrant languages and regional, social, and ethnic dialects. 

ENG 419   Psycholinguistics (3) S.

Prerequisites:  ENG 111 and ENG 310 or ENG 314 or one course in psychology.

Current theory and research in the psychology of language and its historical background, including experiments on speech production and comprehension, acquisition of language by children, and disorders of speech and language. 

ENG 420   Linguistic Analysis (3) S.  

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and ENG 311 or ENG 314.

Descriptive and formal analysis of phonological, syntactic, and/or historical data from a variety of human languages.  Repeatable course. 

ENG 435   Readings in World Literature (3) FS.

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Intensive study of selected major writers from the world’s literature, read in translation. 

ENG 451   Creative Writing (3) FS.

Prerequisites:  ENG 111 and consent of instructor.

Practice in various forms of imaginative writing.  Repeatable course. 

ENG 457   Advanced Composition for Teachers (3)

Prerequisite: ENG 111 and ENG 350 or GWE.

Advanced writing course for prospective secondary school teachers, designed to develop understanding of writing process and techniques for teaching composition.  Course also stresses development of students’ own strengths as writers. 

ENG 465   Chaucer (3) EOY.

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Chaucer’s major poetry, its historical and literary background.

ENG 467   Shakespeare (3) FS.

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Selected comedies, histories, and tragedies. 

ENG 468   Milton (3) EOY.

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

The major works of Milton. 

ENG 485   Studies in Literature, Composition, and Reading (3) F.

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Practice in devising strategies appropriate to the needs of students in grades 7-12.  Emphasis on techniques of developing language skills, of analyzing genres, of making literature accessible, and of generating essay topics from that literature.  Papers regularly required.  Course required for Subject Matter Preparation Program in English. 

ENG 486   Studies in Language and Literature (TESL) (3) S.

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Intensive study of linguistic and literary materials for teachers of English as a Second language. 

ENG 487   Introduction to Second-Language Learning and Teaching (3).

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Focus on linguistic, social, and cultural factors in schooling language-diverse students.  Areas of concentration include first and second-language acquisition, history of second-language teaching, current second-language theoretical frameworks, and dual language teaching strategies. 

ENG 490   Seminar in Literature (3) FS. 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Intensive study of one or more authors, a single historical period, a literary movement or genre, or an aspect of literary criticism.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 492   Seminar in Linguistics (3) S.

Prerequisites: Senior standing and consent of instructor.

Investigations in the historical and/or theoretical foundations of modern linguistics. Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 494   Independent Study (1-4) FS.

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

Intense reading or an original research project or creative writing under faculty supervision.  Arrangements must be made a semester in advance of registration.  Repeatable course. 

ENG 497   Directed Reading (1-4) FS. 

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and department chair.

Extensive reading in selected areas under faculty supervision.  Repeatable course. 

 

Graduate 

Graduate standing or consent of the department chair is prerequisite to enrollment in graduate (500 level) courses. 

ENG 501  Advanced Studies in Literature (3). 

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair. 

Introduction to graduate study in English.  Critical reading of primary and secondary sources (including evaluation of secondary sources within the context of past and current arenas of critical discourse); bibliographic resources; writing about literature; ethics and conventions of presentation and documentation.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 513   History of the English Language (3) F.

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor and department chair.

The evolution of English from its Indo-European origins, through Old and Middle English, to the rise and spread of Modern English.

ENG 514   American English (3) F.

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor and department chair.

American English from colonial times to the present.  Contacts with native, colonial and immigrant languages and regional, social and ethnic dialects.

ENG 530   Seminar: Studies in Medieval Literature  (3) EOY. 

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair. 

A study of major works in English literature before 1500.  Some focus on major continental analogues and critical methodology.  Majority of the texts read in translation.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 535   Seminar:  Studies in Renaissance Literature  (3) S. 

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and  department chair.

Major works in English literature from 1500-1660.  Emphasis on such representative writers as More, Spenser, Shakespeare, Marlowe, Jonson, Donne, Bacon and Milton.  May include continental contemporaries such as Montaigne and Machiavelli.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 540   Seminar:  Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature (1660-1798) (3) EOY.

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair. 

Literature of the Restoration, Neoclassic, and Sensibility eras.  May include readings that provide historical, philosophical, or cultural content.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 543   Seminar:  Studies in Romantic Literature (1798-1832) (3) EOY.

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

Selected studies in the Romantic movement in English literature, including such precursors as Burns and Blake.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 545   Literary Criticism (3) FS.

Prerequisites:  ENG 307 or its equivalent and consent of instructor and department chair.

Major works in literary criticism selected from Plato to the present. 

ENG 546   Seminar:  Studies in Victorian Literature (1832-1901) (3) S.

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

A study of major writers from the Great Reform Bill to the fin de siecle with an emphasis on literary responses to emerging scientific thought, social consciousness, and religious issues.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 549   Seminar:  Studies in Modern British Literature (3) S.

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

Selected literary study of the modern period in England, Ireland, and the Commonwealth, as typified by such novelists and poets as Conrad, Yeats, Lawrence, Joyce, Woolf, Forster, Eliot, Auden, Thomas, Greene, and Lessing.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 552   Seminar:  Studies in American Literature (1836-1917) (3) F.

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

Selected study of major American writing from the American Renaissance to the First World War.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 555   Seminar:  Studies in Modern American Literature (3) S.

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

Study of works by American authors since the Lost Generation. Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 570   Seminar in Writing (3). 

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair. 

Intensive training in writing.  Advanced study of techniques of prose discourse.  Frequent writing assignments.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 571   Discourse Analysis (3). 

Analysis and description of structures and functions of language beyond the sentence level.  May include textual and conversational analysis; classical rhetorical canons; speech acts; scripts/information structures; cohesion, coherence, deixis; spoken and written discourse.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 575   The Teaching of Composition (3) S.

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and department chair.

Theory and practice in teaching composition.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 576   History and Theories of Rhetoric (3) F.

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and department chair.

Major theories of rhetoric from ancient Greece to the present.  Role of rhetoric in the history of ideas. Emphasis on multiple notions of rhetoric and attitudes toward it.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 577   Current Issues in Rhetoric and Composition (3) F.

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

Intensive study of selected topics in rhetoric and composition such as invention and the teaching of writing, issues in literacy instruction, rhetoric and contemporary culture, composition and cognitive development, the composing process in a rhetorical framework, linguistic approaches to rhetoric.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 582   Seminar: Linguistic Analysis  (3)

Seminar in the descriptive and formal analysis of phonological, syntactic, and/or historical data from a variety of human languages.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 583   Seminar:  Psycholinguistics (3)

Seminar in current theory and research in the psychology of language and its historical background, speech production and comprehension, acquisition of language, disorders of speech and language.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 584   Seminar:  Sociolingusitcs  (3)

Examinations of varieties of English and social aspects of language use.  Topics include dialectology, pidgin and creoles, bilingualism, code-switching, and intercultural communication.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 585   Second Language Acquisition (3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

Theories of second-language acquisition second-language learning, bilingualism, and sociocultural variables of language uses, with particular emphasis on the young adult and adult learner.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 586   Teaching Language and Literature in the ESL Context (3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

Intensive study of linguistic and literary materials for ESL teachers.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 587   Seminar:  Current Issues in TESL/Applied Linguistics  (3)

Intensive study of selected topics in TESL/Applied Linguistics such as ESL Writing/Composition, Reading and Vocabulary Acquisition, Pedagogy of Spoken English, Curriculum and Program Design, Testing/Evaluation.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 588   Pedagogical Grammar for TESOL (3)

Examination of areas of English grammar typically taught to non-native speakers.  To familiarize prospective ESL teachers with classroom terminology, techniques and materials.  Develop ability to analyze and explain grammatical phenomena in terms accessible to ESL students. 

ENG 590   Seminar in Literature  (3).

Prerequisite: Consent of chair.

Study of a writer, period,  genre, theme, or problem in literature. Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 592   Seminar:  Topics in Linguistics (3) FS.

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

Advanced topics in phonological, syntactic, historical-comparative or contrastive theory and analysis.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 594   Independent Study (1-4) FS.

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and department chair.

In consultation with a faculty member, the student will investigate in detail current scholarship in some area, or will undertake a project involving original research or creative writing.  Repeatable course. 

ENG 595   Selected Topics (3).

An intensive study of a selected issues in literature or linguistics.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 597   Directed Reading (1-4). 

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and department chair.

Extensive reading in selected areas under the guidance of a faculty mentor.  Repeatable course. 

ENG 600   Graduate Continuation Course (0) FS.

Graduate students who have completed their coursework but not their thesis, project, or comprehensive examination, or who have other requirements remaining for the completion of their degree, may maintain continuous attendance by enrolling in this course.  Signature of graduate program coordinator required.

 

Infrequently Offered Courses

The following courses are scheduled only on a "demand" basis.  Students should consult the department office for information about the next scheduled offering.

ENG 433   Thematic Approaches to Literature (3).

Prerequisite: ENG 111.

An exploration of literature organized around such themes as Women Writers or Death and Dying, using works from a variety of cultures and historical periods.  Repeatable course. 

ENG 477   Individual Authors (3). 

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Works of one or more major authors, such as Spenser or Austen or Baldwin and Morrison.  Course may be repeated with new content.  May be counted twice toward major or minor. 

ENG 591   Integrative Seminar in Literature  (3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

Comparative study of genres, literary movements, or authors over more than one period.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 593   Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

Survey of research methods in applied linguistics, including problem description, data collection and analysis, interpretation of results.  Preparation of Final Project.  Three hours of seminar per week.  Repeatable but may count only once toward the MA degree.