Back to University Catalog 2004-2005

Occupational Therapy   College of Health and Human Services                     Division of Health Sciences

Bachelor of Science

Program admitted final Bachelor of Science in Occupational Therapy class in spring 2004.

Faculty

Claudia G. Peyton, Program Coordinator

Esther Martin, Fieldwork Coordinator

Regular and adjunct fieldwork faculty teach in the program.  This provides a good balance and mix of expertise.  Each possessing the appropriate terminal degree, professional certification and experience.  In addition to the program's excellent faculty, the fieldwork sites provide state-of-art clinical education.

Program Office

WH A-330  (310) 243-2726

Faculty Offices and Activity Centers: 

WH A-320F, WH A-320H

Student Services Center - Advising:

WH A-300, (310) 243-2120 or (800) 844-5484

 

Program Description

The program is structured as a 2 + 2.  All of the prerequisites to the upper division professional OTR course work must be taken before formal application to the major.  Students apply for formal admission to the University as "pre-OT" majors for the first two years.  Once the prerequisites have been completed, the student applies for admission to the major and will begin taking the professional OTR courses which comprise the second half of the program.  This second phase of the program is based upon "Supplemental Admission Criteria".  Not everyone who applies will be admitted.

 

The Profession Of Occupational Therapy

Occupational therapy is a health care discipline focusing upon "occupational" function as well as quality of life; not just upon disease and its pathology associated with disabling conditions.  Occupational therapists use activities as primary assessment and intervention strategies.  By using meaningful occupation, the relevance, motivational set and applicability of the intervention for the individual are measurably increased.

Occupational therapists work in a variety of settings, some of which are traditional rehabilitation settings.  Other settings may be neonatal intensive care units, schools, community based/social service agencies, home health care, hand clinics, skilled nursing facilities and wellness/prevention settings.  Occupational therapists work with the entire spectrum of ages and levels of function, e.g., prevention to chronic disabling disorders.

 

Academic Advisement

Students applying to the University must meet with an advisor as early as possible.  Students are expected to work closely with their advisor.  This usually means an intensive advising session prior to the beginning of each semester.  Students in Fieldwork I and II usually meet at scheduled intervals with the Fieldwork Coordinator.  Careful and comprehensive advising is a key to student success in the University and entails student, faculty and University support services.  Occupational Therapy majors are required to consult with an advisor each semester before registration.  Each student should purchase the University Catalog and become familiar with the academic program and relevant policies and procedures before his/her advising session.

Students must provide the Program with copies of transcripts from all institutions attended.  Each student is expected to obtain a copy of the University Catalog and become familiar with the academic program and relevant policies and procedures before his/her advising session.

Accreditation

The Occupational Therapy Program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, P.O. Box 31220, Bethesda, MD, 20824-1220.  AOTA's phone number is (301) 652-AOTA. 

Certification:  Graduates are eligible to sit for the national certification examination for the occupational therapist administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT).  After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be an Occupational Therapist, Registered (OTR). 

Licensure:  California will require licensure in order to practice.  State license is based on the results of the NBCOT Certification Examination.

 

Admission to the Major in Occupational Therapy

(Second half of the 2 + 2, professional OTR curriculum)

Applicants must submit two separate applications, with supporting documents to the OT program and to CSU Dominguez Hills.  Applications for admission to the OT program may be obtained by writing or calling the OT program office.  Applications and supporting documents must be received no later than September 15 for admission to the spring BSOT program.  Applications received after September 15 will be considered until the class is filled.  Ongoing advisement is available to assist those interested in applying to the program.  Completed applications, along with the supporting documents may be returned to:

Occupational Therapy Program

College of Health and Human Services - Division of Health Science

WH A-330

CSU Dominguez Hills

1000 E. Victoria Street

Carson, CA   90747          (310) 243-2726

Applications for admission to the CSU Dominguez Hills may be obtained by writing or calling the Office of Admission, with completed applications returned to:

Office of Admission

CSU Dominguez Hills

1000 E. Victoria Street

Carson, CA   90747            (310) 243-2726

 

Supplemental Admission Criteria
to the Major in Occupational Therapy

1.   Academic success as reflected by:

a.   GPA in designated required prerequisite course work (minimum 3.00 on a 4.00 scale).

b.   Desirable “pattern” of academic performance (i.e. consistency and/or improvement); and

 c.  Completion of all University requirements for the degree (with the exception of the professional junior and senior occupational therapy courses), including but not limited to the General Education Requirements, statutory, GWAR, and OTR prerequisites;

2.   Interview and evaluation by the Occupational Therapy Admissions Committee (OTAC) of the student's potential to succeed in the program and the profession ( attitude, interest, poise, motivation, expectations, career planning, maturity, social understanding and involvement, flexibility and stability);

3.   Three letters of recommendation are required.  At least one of these letters should validate relevant work experience or knowledge of the field.  The other two should comment on potential to succeed in the fieldwork and in the profession.  Accordingly, it is recommended that one be from an OTR, practicing in the community and the others from faculty teaching the pre-occupational therapy courses at CSU Dominguez Hills.  Recommendations shall address activities within the past year;

4.   Clarity of expression (oral and written) and relevant extracurricular activities; (officer of a student club, e.g. active member or officer of a student club, e.g. Occupational Therapy Club; participation in student governance) and as revealed by an extemporaneous essay and in the application form;

5.   Completion of 80 hours of documented volunteer experience in a variety of settings observing the roles and responsibilities of an occupational therapist; and

6.   Other factors which will be considered, but which will not guarantee selection are: prior qualified application and California veteran status.

The OTAC is composed of a minimum of three program faculty.  One or more oral interviews will be required on campus.

The Program Coordinator will notify the applicant of the admission decision in consultation with the Occupational Therapy faculty. Students must communicate their agreement to the terms and conditions stated in the admissions notification letter within 15 working days following notification.  

Students admitted to the major (last two years) are admitted as a cohort and progress through the professional curriculum as a group, i.e., all students take all of the courses offered each semester or session.  Any exceptions must be approved in advance and can be approved only under exceptional circumstances.

 

Academic Regulations

A grade of “C” is the minimum grade acceptable in the major. Students who receive a grade or grades below the acceptable minimum or who show lack of reasonable progress, may be requested to appear before the faculty.  The faculty  also considers disciplinary cases. Continued lack of progress, in the opinion of the faculty (and with the approval of the Program Coordinator) may result in Administrative or Academic Dismissal from the Program.

 

Transportation

Students will be required to furnish their own transportation to and from the fieldwork sites and in some prerequisite courses that require field trips.

 

Uniforms

Uniforms or laboratory coats are required in some fieldwork settings.  Purchase of a lab coat and school patch are the responsibility of the student.

 

Health Insurance/Immunizations

Student health and accident insurance is required during the fieldwork. It is the responsibility of the student to secure acceptable malpractice insurance and present evidence of such before enrolling in fieldwork. For additional information, review the OT Student Handbook or contact the Program Office.

 

Fingerprinting and Background Check

Students are required to obtain fingerprinting and background check as required by all pediatric fieldwork I and II settings.   It is the student's responsibility to check with the Academic Fieldwork Coordinator regarding procedures.

 

Physical Examination

Successful applicants will be required to obtain a physical examination.  Additional information on these procedures may be obtained by contacting the Program.  It is the students’ responsibility to check with the Fieldwork Coordinator for all requirements including immunizations. The physical examination may be performed by the student’s family physician or, if enrolled physical exam could be scheduled, at the Student Health Center.  An appointment is advised well in advance.

 

Program Objectives for Occupational Therapy

The goal of the program, in addition to preparing clinical practitioners, is to produce professionals who can research, develop, implement  and evaluate procedures utilizing a high degree of independent judgment; and to consult when appropriate with other members of the health care team. 

Upon completion of the Occupational Therapy Program, graduates will be able to:

1.   Provide culturally competent care to consumers from diverse backgrounds.

2.   Synthesize principles from biology and the behavioral sciences into occupational therapy practice.

3.   Demonstrate ability to apply logic and rational thinking to inquiry in Occupational Therapy research practice.

4.   Design occupational therapy programs that demonstrate the integration of multi-dimensional concepts of health and wellness

5.   Serve as a community resource utilizing principles in the occupational therapy education and practice.

6.   Integrate the concept of lifelong learning.

7.   Demonstrate use of evidence-based research to substantiate decisions about occupational therapy interventions.

8.   Demonstrate knowledge of "occupation" as applied to rehabilitation, health and wellness approaches to patient care.

 

 

Graduation With Honors

An undergraduate student may be a candidate for graduation with Honors in Occupational Therapy provided he or she meets the following criteria:

1.   A minimum of 36 units in residence at CSU Dominguez Hills;

2.   A minimum grade point average of at least 3.5 in all courses used to satisfy the upper division requirements in the Occupational Therapy major;

3.   Recommendation by the Occupational Therapy faculty.

Students who achieve Honors in Occupational Therapy will have the information recorded on their transcripts and diplomas.

 

Bachelor of Science in Occupational Therapy

 

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree

See the "Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree" in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements.  A minimum of 40 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division. 

Elective Requirements

Completion of elective courses (beyond the requirements listed below) to reach a total of a minimum of 120 or a maximum of  132 units.

 

General Education Requirements (54-60 units)

See the "General Education" requirements in the University Catalog or the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education requirements and course offerings.

 

United States History, Constitution and American Ideals Requirement (6 units)

See the "United States History, Constitution, and American Ideals" requirements in the University Catalog.  Courses used to satisfy this requirement do not apply to General Education.

 

Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement

See the "Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement" in the University Catalog.

 

Minor Requirements

Single field major, no minor required.

 

Major Requirements (65-77 units)

The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required of all candidates for this degree.

The bachelor of science degree in occupational therapy requires  the completion of a minimum of 74 semester units selected from the following listing.

A.  Lower Division Prerequisite Requirements (18 units)

BIO 250.       Elements of Human Anatomy & Physiology (3)

BIO 251.       Elements of Human Anatomy
& Physiology Laboratory (1)

CSC 101.      Computer Applications (2)

MAT 131.    Elementary Statistics and Probability (3)

OTR 101.      Introduction to Occupational Therapy (3)

OTR 205.      Occupational Therapy Activities
Across the Lifespan (3)

OTR 206.      Human Growth and Development (3)

B.  Bilingual/Multicultural Component (0-6 units)

Proficiency at the level of six units of foreign language instruction or equivalent as certified by the foreign language department is required. For students who are certified as competent, the requirement would be 0 units.

C.  Upper Division Prerequisite Requirements  (6 units) 

PED 301.      Kinesiology (3)

PSY 363.       Abnormal Psychology (3)

D.  Upper Division Requirements (39 units)

HSC 491.      Management Skills in Health Sciences (3)

HSC 492.      Research Methods in Health Sciences (3)          

OTR 301.      Individual and Group Therapeutic Skills (2)

OTR 314.      Conditions of Human Dysfunction I (3)              

OTR 317.      Neuroanatomy & Physiology for OT (3)

OTR 319.      Problems and Issues Related
to Pediatrics and Adolescents I (3)

OTR 320.      Problems and Issues Related
to Pediatrics and Adolescents II (3)

OTR 414.      Conditions of Human Dysfunction II (3)

OTR 422.      Problems and Issues Related
to Adults and Geriatrics I (3)

OTR 424.      Problems and Issues Related
to Adults and Geriatrics II (3)

OTR 430.      Fieldwork I:  Practicum and Seminar I (3)

OTR 432.      Fieldwork I:  Practicum and Seminar II (3)

OTR 461.      Applied Occupational Therapy Research (1)

OTR 462.      Management of Occupational Therapy Services (3)

E.   Field Work (8 units)

OTR 480.      Field Work Level Two I (4)

OTR 482.      Field Work Level Two II (4)

Course Offerings

The credit value for each course in semester units is indicated for each term by a number in parentheses following the title.  Departments may indicate the term in which they expect to offer the course by the use of:  “F” (fall), “S” (spring), "Su" (summer) or “EOY” (every other year).

NOTE: Prerequisite for continuing enrollment in OTR courses is forty documented hours of volunteer or paid work experience in the health care field, subject to the approval of the Department Chair.

Course descriptions for HSC courses can be found in the Health Sciences section of this catalog.

 

Lower Division

OTR 101   Introduction to Occupational Therapy (3)

Examination of occupational therapy’s foundations, historical and philosophical approaches.  Review of current practices, their origins and trends.  Professional ethics, qualifications, certification, rights and responsibilities.

OTR 194   Independent Study in Occupational Therapy (1-3) FS.

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and Program Director.

In-depth study of a topic in occupational therapy under the supervision of an occupational therapy faculty member.  Requires a directed study contract. Repeatable course.

OTR 195   Special Topics in Occupational Therapy (1-3).

An examination of a specific topic and/or subject area in Occupational Therapy.  Repeatable for credit.  Topic will be announced in the Class Schedule. 
One to three hours of lecture per week.

OTR 205   Occupational Therapy Activities Across the Life Span (3) F.

Prerequisite:  OTR 101.

Introduction to activities across the lifespan.  Emphasis on task analysis and age appropriateness.  Activities that use toys, games, computers, creative tasks and activities of daily living, leisure, etc. explored for use in occupational therapy.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.

OTR 206   Human Growth
and Development (3) S.

Prerequisite:  OTR 101.

Exploration of the stages of development from birth through geriatrics, including biological, psychological, cognitive, and social aspects.  Emphasis on analysis of occupational of performance areas and their relationship to the health-illness continuum.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week. 

OTR 295   Special Topics in Occupational Therapy (3).

An examination of a specific topic and/or subject area in Occupational Therapy.  Repeatable for credit. Topic will be announced in the Class Schedule.  One hour of lecture and four hours of activity per week.

Upper Division

NOTE: Prerequisite for enrollment in professional upper division OTR courses is completion of all lower division course work.

Requirements for Enrolling in Upper Division Courses

1.  Students must apply to the Major in Occupation Therapy.  Only those who have completed all prerequisites, including General Education; Statutory; and the GWAR are eligible to apply.

2.  Because there are fewer positions available than qualified applicants, the program is impacted.  Only a limited number of qualified students may be admitted to the major in occupational therapy.  Admission is competitive and applicants are selected using the "Supplemental Admission Criteria."

OTR 301   Individual and Group Therapeutic Skills (2) S.

Life tasks and activity related to occupational therapy practice. Development of entry-level competencies in group and individual therapeutic skills. Student reports and projects. One hour of lecture and two hours of activity per week.

OTR 314   Conditions of Human Dysfunction I (3) S.

Prerequisite:  OTR 317, PED 301, and PSY 363.

Major medical entities, such as, degenerative, genetic, traumatic, organic, emotional and behavioral disorders and social conditions which affect occupational performance.  Covers neurological, skeletal, sensory and contextually relevant issues from birth to adolescence.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.

OTR 317   Neuroanatomy and Physiology for OT (3) Su.

Gross and microscopic structure and function of the human nervous system. Introduction to experimental and clinical techniques. Two hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory.

OTR 319   Problems and Issues Related to Pediatrics and Adolescents I (3) F.

Prerequisite:  OTR 301, OTR 314, OTR 317, PED 301.

Commonly observed occupational performance dysfunctions secondary to medical, biophysical and psychosocial conditions in children, ages 0-12 years old.  Conceptual models, evaluation, treatment planning, intervention, reassessment, termination of intervention, and documentation.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.

OTR 320   Problems and Issues Related to Pediatrics and Adolescents II (3) S.

Prerequisites:  OTR 319.

Commonly observed occupational performance dysfunctions secondary to medical, biophysical and psychosocial conditions in children, ages 13-21 years old.  Conceptual models, evaluation, treatment planning, intervention, reassessment, termination of intervention, and documentation.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity
per week.

OTR 395   Special Topics in Occupational Therapy (1-3) Su.

An examination of a specific topic and/or subject area in Occupational Therapy.  Repeatable for credit.  Topic will be announced in the Class Schedule. 
One to three hours of lecture per week.

OTR 414   Conditions of Human Dysfunction II (3) S.

Prerequisites:  OTR 314.

Major medical entities, such as, degenerative, trauma, organic mental disorders, and social conditions which affect occupational performance.  Neurological, musculo-skeletal, cognitive, sensory and contextually relevant issues from adulthood through geriatrics. Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.

OTR 422   Problems and Issues Related to Adults and Geriatrics I (3) F.

Prerequisite:  OTR 301, OTR 317, OTR 414, PED 301, PSY 363

Commonly observed occupational performance dysfunctions secondary to medical biophysical and psychosocial conditions in geriatrics.  Conceptual models, evaluation, treatment planning, intervention, reassessment, termination of intervention, and documentation. Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.

OTR 424   Problems and Issues Related to Adults and Geriatrics II (3) S.

Prerequisite:  OTR 422.

Commonly observed occupational performance dysfunctions secondary to medical biophysical and psychosocial conditions in geriatrics.  Conceptual models, evaluation, treatment planning, intervention, reassessment, termination of intervention, and documentation.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.

OTR 430   Fieldwork I:  Practicum and Seminar I (3) F.

Prerequisite:  OTR 301, OTR 314, OTR 317,
PSY 363.

Basic occupational therapy principles and practices with emphasis on recognition and evaluation of human conditions of wellness, prevention and disorder in children and adolescents.  Issues and problems encountered in the practicum.  One hour seminar, 80 hours of Fieldwork I.

OTR 432   Fieldwork I:  Practicum and Seminar II (3) F.

Prerequisite:  OTR 301, OTR 317, OTR 414,
PSY 363.

Basic occupational therapy principles and practices with emphasis on recognition and evaluation of human conditions of wellness, prevention and disorder in adults and geriatrics.  Issues and problems encountered in the practicum.  One hour seminar, 80 hours of Fieldwork I.

OTR 461   Applied Occupational Therapy Research (1) F.

Prerequisite:  HSC 492, OTR 498

Preparation for and completion of an oral and/or written presentation of completed research projects at a state occupational therapy conference or campus event or for publication.

OTR 462   Management of Occupational Therapy Services (3) S.

Prerequisites:  OTR 440 required; completion of OTR 300 level courses or concurrent enrollment.

Application of principles including: planning, organizing, staffing, coordinating or directing and controlling; environmental and policy issues impacting the provision of occupational therapy services; information competence; use of technology in service delivery. 

OTR 480   Field Work Level Two I (4) FS.

Prerequisite:  Completion of upper division requirements listed under “D”.  CR/NC grading only.

Supervised fieldwork at one approved clinical site.  Minimum of 470 hour block.

OTR 482   Field Work Level Two II (4) FS.

Prerequisite:  OTR 480.

Supervised fieldwork at one approved clinical site.  Minimum of 470 hour block.  CR/NC grading only.

OTR 497   Directed Study in Occupational Therapy (1-3) FS.

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and Program Director.

Project study. Selected topic of student interest in occupational therapy. Requires directed study contract. Repeatable course.

OTR 498   Directed Research (3) Su.

Prerequisites: HSC 492

Conduct a significant research project under faculty supervision; IRB proposal and approval; data collection and analysis with application to occupational therapy practice; written research report.