Communications

College of Arts and Humanities

Department of Communications

 

Electronic Media Programming and Production Emphasis

Mass Communications Emphasis

Public Relations Emphasis

 

Minors

Advertising

Communications

 

Certificate

Telecommunications

 

Subject Matter Preparation Program

(for requirements, refer to the English section in this catalog)

 

Faculty

Edd Whetmore, Department Chair

Nancy Cheever, Coordinator, Undergraduate Communications Research Program

W. Leonard Lee, Donn Silvis, Rich W. Turner,                                        Edward J. Whetmore

Carole Gerst, Department Secretary

Department Office: SAC-1166, (310) 243-3313;                     FAX (310) 516-3779

 

Emeritus Faculty

David Safer

 

Mission Statement

The mission of the Communications Department is to prepare professionals who will successfully compete in today’s marketplace in the areas of electronic media programming and production, mass communications, public relations, advertising, and telecommunications. Additionally, the department strives to increase skills in writing, journalism, presentation, research, and digital media production including full utilization of the world wide web.

 

Program Description

Students dedicated to building professional careers in print media, film, TV production, telecommunications, and the closely-related fields of public relations, advertising and organizational communications, will find degree programs designed by the Communications Department to meet their needs and to challenge their skills and interests.

Departmental curricula are designed to prepare students to pursue careers as communications professionals in the media-rich communications industries and corporations. As such, students will be expected to be adept at basic language skills and knowledgeable in at least one area of specialization. They also should be aware of professional responsibilities, ethical practices and laws governing the mass media.

Students from other disciplines, seeking to improve their communications skills and knowledge about the media and their impact upon society, will find a variety of course offerings.

 

Electronic Media (Television) Programming and Production

The department offers the Bachelor of Arts in Communications with an emphasis in Electronic Media Programming and Production (40 units).

This program is designed to prepare students for various careers in the electronic (television) media industries of public and commercial broadcasting, cable television and corporate/educational video.

The television environment is no longer totally dominated by the three network giants of ABC, CBS and NBC. Other entities have gained entry into this highly demanding market, and as a result the job market for future broadcasting professionals has broadened. This broadening has created the need for revised curriculum to help students prepare to meet these new challenges. The Communications Department continues to adjusts its classes to meet those needs of currency in the areas of programming content and production. We seek to meld the needs of the industries with the realities of the production studio to create a hybrid professional who is able to compete effectively in the corporate and public world of television/new media programming and production. The Communications Department has implemented digital media production techniques and hardware.

Electronic media journalists may become involved in TV news and public affairs production on campus or may publish to the world wide web.

 

Mass Communications

The department offers the Bachelor of Arts Degree in Communications with an emphasis in Mass Communications (40 units).

Communications majors who wish to maximize their career opportunities may choose an emphasis in Mass Communications. This emphasis integrates rather than segregates instruction in public relations, electronic media/production and content, and the knowledge and skills necessary for success as writers, editors and producers in the career fields of newspapers, magazines, books, wire services, radio, television and the expanding multimedia publishing enterprises of CD-ROMs, interactive media, and the World Wide Web.

The Mass Communications emphasis, in which faculty advisers tailor the curriculum in response to the goals and talents of each individual student, was created by the department in recognition
of three key realities about today’s world of communications. First, communications professionals must be prepared to cross over the traditional operating boundaries of print, broadcast, film and electronic media. Second, communications professionals must be prepared during the course of their working life to move upward by moving laterally from one medium to another (for example, from writing press releases for newspapers to producing video news releases for television to producing documentaries for corporations, TV networks, schools and cyberspace). Third, increasingly unpredictable changes in the economics of communications challenge today’s undergraduates to prepare to present themselves as credible candidates for the most desirable entry-level communications jobs available at the time and place their careers begin.

 

Public Relations

The department offers the Bachelor of Arts in Communications with an emphasis in Public Relations (40 units).

This program is designed for students interested in careers in public relations and the related fields of marketing and organizational communications.

Government, civic groups, nonprofit organizations, corporations and educational institutions all require the services of public relations practitioners to manage their communications programs and to help determine public policy. This process, sometimes defined as strategic problem-solving through communications, encompasses everything from counseling top management to the preparation of press releases. It includes the entire gamut of informational media materials such as audio and video programs, employee publications, brochures, newsletters and annual reports; surveying and analyzing public opinion; speech writing; lobbying; fund raising and the planning of special events. Students in this emphasis are encouraged to join the department-sponsored Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) Chapter.

Public Relations students receive exposure to diverse communications-related fields.

 

Advertising

The department offers an Interdisciplinary Minor in Advertising (18 units), in conjunction with the School of Business and Public Administration and the Art Department, combining courses in advertising, marketing and graphic design.

The Advertising Minor provides an overview of both the business and creative sides of the advertising field.

 

Features

  Our location in Los Angeles is at the heart of one of the nation’s prime media centers. This enables the department to draw upon an unparalleled pool of industry professionals as guest lecturers and part-time instructors. Wide-ranging internship opportunities are open to our students, in addition to employment opportunities in one of the largest media markets in the world.

  Small class sizes allow students to receive individual attention from instructors and advisors and obtain maximum hands-on experience and access to production facilities.

  The department’s state-of-the-art writing/graphics/research laboratory, electronic media production laboratory, and a photographic laboratory provide students the opportunity to sharpen their skills as writers, reporters, editors, researchers, graphic designers, photojournalists and media producers.

  A spacious three-camera color television studio with professional, state-of-the-art equipment and lighting allows students the opportunity to produce broadcast quality television programs and media programming for emerging new markets.

  Digital portable field production and non-linear editing systems give television students hands-on experience in location shooting and video editing.

 

Academic Advisement

The Communications Department places a high priority on student advisement. Each student entering the department is assigned an academic advisor from among the members of the full-time faculty.

Students have ample opportunity to meet individually with their advisors to discuss academic and professional matters. All departmental faculty members, are dedicated to helping students in the essential process of acculturation to the professional practices and life styles of communications professionals.

Students are urged to meet with faculty members as soon as questions arise. High academic standards of the department require that all communications majors and minors pass all required and prerequisite courses with grades of “C” or better. All Communications majors must complete a minor in a subject other than Communications.

 

Preparation

The ability to use the English language effectively is crucial to the success of the communications professional. Therefore, students are urged to take at least four years of college preparatory English.

The Communications Department deals primarily with the theory and process of communication, and the tools and techniques used to deliver messages composed of words, symbols, music, sound, nonverbal signs and visual elements. Message content, on the other hand, is derived from substantive knowledge of other disciplines – such as the political or behavioral sciences, economics, science and technology, sports, business management or public administration.

Students interested in communications careers should, therefore, prepare themselves by completing a broad spectrum of studies designed to increase their knowledge and awareness of facts, trends and developments in the many disciplines mentioned above.

 

Undergraduate Research Program

The year-long CSU Dominguez Hills Communications Undergraduate Research Program is one of the most rigorous in the nation. All Communications majors must complete it by enrolling in COM 400 and COM 490. These courses cannot be taken concurrently. Work in COM 400 culminates with an approved original research proposal. In COM 490, students complete a detailed five-chapter thesis that reports their findings.

Typically, these projects involve marketing and consumer behavior, social or ethical issues, the effects of mass communication, or some other appropriate topic. Students are required to choose their own thesis topics and often these reflect their career interests. In addition to providing a sample of student work for a prospective employer, these theses offer the student a unique opportunity to work one-on-one with faculty to improve their written and oral communication skills.

 

Career Possibilities

The field of communications offers a vast number of challenging and rewarding professional and technical job opportunities.

Recent breakthroughs in information processing and telecommunications, including the meteoric rise of satellite TV, cable TV, web based distribution and corporate video, have sparked new employment opportunities. The steadily increasing influence of the mass media and the growing interest of business and industry in public relations, advertising, “in-house video” communications and production for the world wide web also have opened a variety of new job opportunities.

 

Mass Communications

Reporter, editor, feature writer, columnist, correspondent, newscaster, editorial writer, advertising sales, news director, media management, researcher and photographer.

 

Public Relations and Advertising

Account executive, public relations/advertising manager, marketing communications, advertising media analyst, corporate communications, public information officer, advertising copy writer, advertising designer, publications editor, product promotion and speech writer.

 

Electronic Media, Television and New Media

Writer, producer, director, video editor, or ENG crew member for cable, corporate, educational or commercial broadcasting; media director for corporate video; public-access coordinator in cable television; web-based video distributor; direct to DVD producer; video game designer; video blogger; new media purveyor; and broadcaster/webcaster.

 

Student Organizations

The Communications Department has sponsored a chapter of the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA) since 1979. The Chapter’s Mission is: (1) to serve its student members by enhancing their knowledge of public relations and providing access to professional development opportunities; and (2) to serve the public relations profession by helping to develop highly qualified, well-prepared professionals. PRSSA cultivates a favorable and mutually advantageous relationship between student members and professional public relations practitioners. The CSUDH Chapter is highly active, holding monthly meetings and sponsoring various on- and off-campus social and professional activities.

We are also an institutional member of the Broadcast Education Association. Additionally, students can be recommended for student membership in the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. Our students have been named recipients of Local Area Emmys, Student Emmys, and various other awards.

Student membership in these organizations is highly recommended.

 

Graduation With Honors

An undergraduate student may be a candidate for graduation with Honors in Communications provided he or she meets the following criteria:

1.   A minimum of 36 units in residence at CSU Dominguez Hills;

2.   A minimum grade point average of at least 3.5 in all courses used to satisfy the upper division requirements in the major;

3.   In addition, the student must be recommended by the faculty of the Communications Department.

 

 

 

 

Bachelor of Arts in Communications

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor’s Degree

See the “Requirements for the Bachelor’s Degree” in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements. A minimum of 40 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division.

 

Elective Requirements

Completion of elective courses (beyond the requirements listed below) to reach a total of a minimum of 120 units.

 

General Education Requirements (55-62 units)

See the “General Education” requirements in the University Catalog or the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education requirements and course offerings.

 

Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement

See the “Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement” in the University Catalog.

 

Minor Requirements

Students completing this major will need to complete a minor in another field or in the same field when combined with the minor in advertising.

 

Major Requirements (40 units)

Students must select one of the emphases listed. The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required of all candidates for this degree.

 

Common Core Requirements (19 units)

A.   Lower Division Required Courses (6 units)

COM 100.    Mass Media and Society (3)

COM 250.    Writing for the Media (3)

 

B.  Upper Division Required Courses (10 units)

COM 302.    Law of the Mass Media (3)

COM 400.    Communication Theory and Research (3)

COM 490.    Senior Seminar (3)

COM 397.    On-Campus Internship (1) or

COM 496.    Off-Campus Internships (1)*

*NOTE: Communication majors receive only one unit toward the Communication major requirements

 

C.  Additional Upper Division Writing Course (3 units)

One of the following courses may be chosen to fulfill the core upper-division writing requirement, or as an elective in the appropriate emphasis, but cannot be used for both:

COM 352.    Feature and Critical Writing (3)

COM 355.    Print Media Production Workshop (3)

COM 366.    Public Relations Writing (3)

COM 381.    Scriptwriting for Electronic Media (3)

 

Electronic Media Programming
and Production          Emphasis (40 units)

The Electronic Media Programming and Production Emphasis is scheduled for discontinuance. Please contact the department for additional information.

A.   Common Core Requirements (19 units)

 

B.  Emphasis Requirements (12 units)

COM 101.    Introduction to Video Practices (3)

COM 379.    Telecommunications Media Practices
and Technology (3)

COM 383.    Studio Video Production (3)

COM 384.    Electronic Media Field Production (3)

 

C. Electives (9 units) – Select four courses from the following:

COM 130.    Film Classics (3)

COM 206.    Photojournalism (3)

COM 300.    Organizational Communications (3)

COM 305.    Overview of Interactive Media (3)

COM 306.    Interactive Multimedia Authoring (3)

COM 352.    Feature and Critical Writing (3)

COM 358.    Communication Graphics (3)

COM 381.    Scriptwriting for the Electronic Media (3)

COM 385.    Electronic Media Programming Production (3)

COM 386.    Electronic Media Editing (3)

COM 387.    Mass Media Aesthetics and Program Content:
The Documentary Film (3)

COM 396.    Workshop in Video/Electronic Media Production (3)

COM 425.    Management in the Mass Media (3) [I}

COM 495.    Special Topics in Communications (3)

 

Mass Communications Emphasis (40 units)

A.   Common Core Requirements (19 units)

 

B.  Emphasis Requirements (9 units)

COM 352.    Feature and Critical Writing (3)

COM 358.    Communication Graphics (3)

COM 365.    Introduction to Public Relations (3)

 

C. Electives (12 units) -- Select four courses from the following:

COM 130.    Film Classics (3)

COM 206.    Photojournalism (3)

COM 300.    Organizational Communications (3)

COM 305.    Overview of Interactive Media (3)

COM 306.    Interactive Multimedia Authoring (3)

COM 352.    Feature and Critical Writing (3)

COM 355.    Print Media Production Workshop (3)

COM 366.    Public Relations Writing (3)

COM 379.    Telecommunications Media Practices
and Technology (3)

COM 381.    Scriptwriting for the Electronic Media (3)

COM 383.    Studio Video Production (3)

COM 384.    Electronic Media Field Production (3)

COM 385.    Electronic Media Programming Production (3)

COM 386.    Electronic Media Editing (3)

COM 387.    Mass Media Aesthetics and Program Content:                 The Documentary Film (3)

COM 396.    Workshop in Video/Electronic Media Production (3)

COM 425.    Management in the Mass Media (3) [I]

COM 495.    Special Topics in Communications (3)

 

Public Relations Emphasis (40 units)

A.   Common Core Requirements (19 units)

 

B.  Upper Division Required Courses (9 units)

COM 365.    Introduction to Public Relations (3)

COM 366.    Public Relations Writing (3)

COM 467.    Public Relations Management (3)

 

C.  Electives (12 units): Select four courses from the following:

COM 206.    Photojournalism (3)

COM 300.    Organizational Communication (3)

COM 352.    Feature and Critical Writing (3)

COM 355.    Print Media Production Workshop (3)

COM 358.    Communication Graphics (3)

COM 379.    Telecommunications Media Practices
and Technology (3)

COM 381.    Scriptwriting for the Electronic Media (3)

COM 383.    Studio Video Production (3)

COM 384.    Electronic Media Field Production (3)

COM 385.    Electronic Media Programming Production (3)

COM 386.    Electronic Media Editing (3)

COM 396.    Workshop in Video/Electronic Media Production (3)

COM 495.    Special Topics in Communications (3)

 

 

Minor in Advertising (18 units)

COM 342.    Advertising Copywriting (3)

COM 344.    Advertising Media Analysis (3)

ART 344.     Design Practices I (3)

MKT 350.     Principles of Marketing (3)

MKT 352.     Marketing Communications (3)

MKT 355.     Consumer Behavior (3)

 

 

Minor in Communications
(12 units)

A.   Lower Division Required Courses (6 units)

COM 100.    Mass Media and Society (3)

COM 250.    Writing for the Media (3)

 

B.  Upper Division Required Courses (6 units): Select two upper division Communications elective courses.

 

 

Certificate in Telecommunications (15 units)

Required Courses

COM 303.    Policy and Regulation Issues for
Telecommunications (3)

COM 312.    Telecommunications Technologies (3)

COM 403.    Financial Analysis and Strategies for
Telecommunications Resources (3)

COM 495.    Special Topics in Communications:
Telecommunications Planning and Consulting (3)

COM 496.    Off Campus Internship:
Telecommunications Practicum (3)

 

 

Course Offerings

The credit value for each course in semester units is indicated for each term by a number in parentheses following the title. For course availability, please see the list of tentative course offerings in the current Class Schedule.

 

Lower Division

COM 100 Mass Media and Society (3).

Survey of mass communications media and their effects on society. Comparative analysis of newspapers, magazines, wire services, radio, television, motion picture, public relations and advertising. Problems and potentials of the mass media as mirrors and molders of society.

COM 101 Introduction to
Video Practices (3).

Introduction to the process of small format   1/2” and 3/4” instructional video production. The course emphasizes participation in crew assignment on a variety of video taping projects on campus. Repeatable course. One hour of lecture and four hours of activity per week.

COM 130 Film Classics (3).

Viewing and analysis of selected American and foreign films of the sound era which represent milestones in the development of the cinema. Guest filmmakers and performers from the industry may discuss various screenings with the class. Repeatable course.

COM 206 Photojournalism (3).

Instruction in the basic principles of still photography. Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

COM 250 Writing for the Media (3).

Prerequisites: Typing 25 wpm.

Instruction and practice in the basics of reporting and writing news for print and electronic media.

 

Upper Division

COM 300 Organizational
Communications (3).

Organizational theory and the role that communication plays in modern business, industrial and governmental organizations. Case studies and reviews of the literature in solving communication problems of complex human organizations.

COM 302 Law of the Mass Media (3).

Libel law, right to privacy, contempt of court, copyright, the right to print news of public affairs, the Freedom of Information Act, and other legal topics of concern to the media professional.

COM 303 Policy and Regulation Issues for Telecommunications (3) .

The study of telecommunications policies, regulations and laws. Focus on current regulatory schemes at local, state, and federal levels and their impact on technology and society.

COM 305 Overview of
Interactive Multimedia (3).

Prerequisites: Junior standing with consent of instructor. Working knowledge of the Windows 95/NT operating system.

General overview of current topics and issues in interactive multimedia. Provides an introduction to interactive multimedia concepts, roles, products and systems. Explores the planning, prototyping, producing, testing, and distributing of multimedia products. Three hours of seminar per week.

COM 306 Interactive Multimedia
Authoring (3).

Prerequisites: COM 305.

Production techniques resulting in interactive multimedia product, utilizing audience analysis, design concepts, budgeting, and principles of interactivity. Final student projects will be mastered on CD-ROM, ported to the WWW, or “burned” on other appropriate media. Six hours of activity per week.

COM 312 Telecommunications
Technologies (3).

Basic theory and principles of the operation and utilization of contemporary telecommunications technologies and delivery systems. Assessment of the implications of current and developing technologies.

COM 342 Advertising
Copywriting (3).

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and COM 250 or equivalent are required; ART 344 or COM 358 are recommended.

Creating and preparing advertisements for print and electronic media. Students will write copy for product and institutional ads.

COM 344 Advertising
Media Analysis (3).

Analysis of the comparative advantages (cost and market impact) of various advertising media as a basis for time and space buying within the context of the creative advertising campaign with an emphasis on campaign planning and implementation.

COM 346 Reporting and
Information Gathering (3).

Prerequisites: COM 250 and typing 30 wpm.

Theory and practice of information gathering for print and electronic media writing, including the art of interviewing. Identification, assessing and verifying published, computerized data base and “live” sources. Special emphasis on interview problems such as invalid inference and supposition. Two hours lecture, two hours activity per week.

COM 352 Feature and Critical Writing (3).

Prerequisites: COM 250 and typing 30 wpm.

Analysis and practice of preparing feature stories and critical reviews for newspapers, magazines, radio, television and video. Assignments include profiles, how-to pieces and news features. Critical reviews focus on theatre, film, music, fine arts and books. Two hours lecture, two hours activity per week.

COM 355 Print Media
Production Workshop (3).

Prerequisites: COM 250 and COM 358.

Production of laboratory campus newspaper. Reporting, writing, editing, layout, computer typesetting, photography and graphics. Repeatable course. Two hours
of lecture and three hours of production activities per week.

COM 358 Communication                 Graphics (3).

Prerequisites: COM 250 and typing 30 wpm.

Learning methods for producing various forms of visual communications including fliers, informational graphics and logos, newsletters, magazines and newspapers in correlation with desktop publishing, page design, typography selection, copy fitting photo sizing and cropping. Two hours lecture, two hours activity per week.

COM 365 Introduction to
Public Relations (3).

Public relations practices and principles
as applied to government, education and industry.

COM 366 Public Relations Writing (3).

Prerequisites: COM 250 and COM 365 and type 30 wpm.

Public relations writing; message and audience analysis. Creating effective forms of public relations communications, producing print and video press releases, public service announcements, media fact sheets and alerts, executive letters, press kits and brochures and newsletter copy. Two hours lecture, two hours activity per week.

COM 379 Telecommunications
Media Practices and
Technologies (3).

Analyses of contemporary programming, production and distribution practices in
the context of the historical evolution of telecommunications. Examines interrelationship between traditional broadcasting structures and such emerging entities as cable, satellite, multimedia and computer systems.

COM 381 Scriptwriting
for Electronic Media (3).

Prerequisite: COM 250.

Practice in script writing for TV and film. Development of writing styles suitable for each of these media. Emphasis on formal distinctions between aural and visual media.

COM 383 Studio Video Production (3).

Prerequisite: COM 101.

Familiarization with studio equipment
and control room procedures; uses and functions of microphones, cameras, setting and lighting as they pertain to studio program production. Students will engage in crew rotation for class practica and individual production assignments. One hour lecture and four hours activity per week.

COM 384 Electronic Media
Field Production (3).

Prerequisites: COM 383.

Emphasis is on the use of small format video technologies allowing program producers to explore the use of single camera productions in various formats. The roles of producer, videographer, production assistant and videotape editor will be interchanged. One hour lecture and four hours activity per week.

COM 385 Electronic Media Programming Production (3).

Prerequisites: COM 383.

Emphasis is placed on news, information and persuasive programming in both studio and field production environments. Production focus will be varied covering categories such as news, informational, persuasive, instructional, public affairs and corporate formats and programs as production assignments.

COM 386 Electronic Media Editing (3).

Prerequisites: COM 101, COM 383, or COM 384. COM 385 is recommended.

Exploration of the role of editing in the video production and post-production processes of traditional and new media, using both analog and digital formats. Emphasis on digital non-linear editing techniques. Six hours of activity per week.

COM 387 Mass Media Aesthetics
and Program Content:
The Documentary Film (3).

Prerequisite: Junior Standing.

An investigation through screening and analysis of the use of the documentary format as a persuasive communications tool in disseminating information on issues that have journalistic, sociological, political and psychological dimensions.

COM 396 Workshop in Video/Electronic Media Production (3).

Prerequisites: COM 383 and/or COM 384 or COM 385.

Engagement in broadcast video and non-broadcast multimedia productions. Students write, produce, direct projects, and crew for others. Successful projects mastered/ported to university’s cable channel/CD-ROM workstation/Web Server. Repeatable. Three credits toward major. Six hours of activity per week.

COM 397 On-Campus Internship (1).

Prerequisites: Senior standing and approval of the department is required; completion of a minimum of 27 upper division units in the major is recommended.

Directed work experience in the communications field—in print or electronic journalism, public relations, advertising, or broadcasting. Ideally, such work provides a practical bridge linking the student’s academic studies with the world of work. CR/NC grading. A minimum of 10 hours per week of supervised work experience under the direction of a professionally qualified mentor.

COM 400 Communication Theory
and Research (3).

Prerequisites: COM 100 and COM 250.

Provides an overview of mass communications from a theory and research perspective. Explores how audiences receive and use messages and how the research on these activities affects the way mass communication is generated.

COM 403 Financial Analysis and Strategies for Telecommunications Resources (3).

Prerequisite: COM 303 or equivalent.

Case studies in costing telecommunications. Developing and responding to RFPs/RFQs. Needs analysis. Financial strategies for telecommunications expenditures. Developing business cases.

COM 467 Public Relations Workshop (3).

Prerequisites: COM 250, COM 365, COM 366, and type 30 wpm.

Analysis of organizational systems and developing strategies for planning/implementing public relations campaigns and preventing/solving public relations problems. Emphasis is placed on both individual and team case studies, incorporating both strategic planning and writing techniques previously learned.

COM 490 Senior Seminar (3).

Prerequisite: COM 100 and COM 400; senior standing.

Integrative studies and in-depth analyses
of the mass media and their role in society. Preparation of major thesis paper and the sharing of research findings during seminar discussions. Three hours of seminar per week.

COM 494 Independent Study (1-3).

Independent study in any relevant subject area under the direction of a member of
the Communications Department faculty. Repeatable course.

COM 495 Special Topics in
Communications (3).

An intensive study of an issue or concept in communications that is of special interest to both the faculty member and the students, such as press and social issues or sports in the media. Repeatable course. Three hours of lecture per week.

COM 496 Off-Campus Internships (1-3).

Prerequisites: Senior standing and/or approval of the department is required; completion of a minimum of 27 upper division units in the major is recommended.

Directed work experience in the communications field—print or electronic journalism, public relations or advertising, film, broadcasting, or telecommunications. Ideally, such work provides a practical bridge linking the student’s academic studies with the world of work. A minimum of 10 hours a week of supervised work experience under the direction of a professionally-qualified mentor.

 

Infrequently Offered Courses

The following courses are scheduled on
a “demand” basis. Students should consult the department office for information about the next schedule offering.

 

COM 346 Reporting and
Information Gathering (3).

Prerequisites: COM 250 and typing 30 wpm.

Theory and practice of information gathering for print and electronic media writing, including the art of interviewing. Identification, assessing and verifying published, computerized data base and “live” sources. Special emphasis on interview problems such as invalid inference and supposition. Two hours lecture, two hours activity per week.

COM 348 News Editing and Design (2).

Prerequisites: COM 250 and typing 30 wpm.

Principles, practice in copy editing, including review of grammar, spelling, punctuation, word use, organization, word flow, sentences, information verification, application of appropriate story forms; writing headlines, photo cropping and sizing, computer desktop page design and editorial judgment. One hour lecture, two hours activity per week.

COM 360 Public Affairs
and Editorial Writing (3).

Prerequisites: COM 250, COM 346, and typing
30 wpm.

Reporting, writing and editorial interpretation of public affairs events and issues, including on-site coverage of local governments, civic affairs, schools, police and courts. Utilization of public documents, enhancement of interviewing techniques, with emphasis on accuracy, clarity and social responsibility. Two hours lecture and two hours activity per week.

COM 425 Management in                                  the Mass Media (3).

Prerequisites: COM 100 and COM 250.

Emphasizes management of the electronic media industries, the most heavily regulated in the field of mass communications. Covers organizational theory, principles of management, functions/style of the manager, programming, sales, promotion and community relations.