Course Offerings

AFS 200    Introduction to Africana Studies (3).

Prerequisite: Completion of EPT Requirement.

An introduction to the discipline of Africana Studies.  An overview of the philosophical underpinnings, evolution, theories and concepts, and practical applications of the disciplines; and the African-centered, holistic method of studying the African world.

AFS 201    African World Civilizations (3). 

A survey of African Civilizations from antiquity to the present.  The survey includes a review of the African presence in Asia, Europe, and the Americas.  The course examines the experiences of peoples of African descent and their contributions to world civilizations. 

AFS 212    Introduction to Comparative Ethnic and Global Societies  (3). 

Explores the lived experiences of the Ethnic/Global communities in the U.S. and their places of origin.  The course will examine the socio-cultural dynamics in Chicano/Latino, Asian-Pacific and Africana communities.

AFS 220    African World Peoples and Cultures (3).    

To provide students with an overview of African world peoples, societies and cultures.  Students will cover the similarities and differences among the various people of African descent and, explore both the historical and cultural foundations of African world peoples and societies.  Emphasis will be on cultural continuity and reconstruction. 

AFS 231    Africana Literary Traditions (3). 

Prerequisite:   ENG 111 or consent of instructor.

Introduction to Africana Literary traditions.  Focuses on how Africana writers' use language and images to recreate their specific and shared histories.  Selects authors who represent distinct literary traditions and discusses the major characteristics of each tradition.

AFS 241    History of African World People: 1450-1888 (3). 

Examination of the history of African people throughout the world from 1450-1888.  Identifies African migration, national culture, and political divisions.  Examines the dynamics of the Transatlantic Slave Trade, and surveys the territorial dispersal of African people around the globe, their links and metamorphoses.

AFS 242    History of African World People: 1888-Present (3). 

An examination of the history of African world peoples from 1888 with the end of slavery in Brazil to the present.  The dynamics of apartheid and colonialism, nationalism, civil rights and liberation movements are central themes.

AFS 295    Special Topics in Africana Studies (3).

An examination of a specific topic and/or subject area of Africana Studies.  Repeatable for credit.  Topic will be announced in Schedule of Classes. 

AFS 301    Africana Music Through the 19th Century (3). 

Prerequisite:   AFS 200 and AFS 220

Africana music course designed to introduce the music and musicians of Africa and the African Diaspora culture, establishing the African foundation of the musical practices and exploring early developments in the Diaspora with special focus upon developments in all parts of the Americas from 1619 to 1888.

AFS 305    Theories and Approaches in Africana Studies (3). 

Prerequisite:   AFS 200 and AFS 220.

An introduction to the theories and approaches utilized by Africana Studies scholars.  Focus is on the intellectual approaches to the study of African peoples from the perspective of Africana cultural imperative. 

AFS 306    Research Methods in Africana Studies (3). 

Prerequisite:   AFS 200 and AFS 220.

Introduces students to intellectual debates in research methods in Africana Studies.  It focuses on the applicability and relevance of different methods of acquiring, interpreting and presenting Africana knowledge systems.

AFS 330    Africana Literature and Culture (3). 

Prerequisite:   AFS 231

Survey course that introduces students to both Africana literature and culture. Provides students with an opportunity to study and appreciate major Africana political, cultural and historical issues and experiences through the lenses of Africana literature.

AFS 395    Special Topics in Africana Studies (3). 

Prerequisites: Completion of EPT Requirement and consent of instructor.

Intensive study of a single period, figure, movement, or idea in African world history/culture.  Course repeatable for credit.  Topics will be announced in Schedule of Classes. 

AFS 396    Practicum in Africana Studies (3). 

Prerequisites:  AFS 201, AFS 220 or consent of instructor.

Supervised work experience in an African or African diaspora community with emphasis upon social and economic development in a local, national and/or international setting.  Supervision emphasizes training and application of practical and technical skills.  Students will be placed in settings suitable to their academic specialization.  CR/NC grading.  Repeatable courses.  One hour of tutorial per week is required with instructor. 

AFS 423    Africana Leaders Seminar (3). 

Prerequisite:  AFS 200 and AFS 201 are recommended.

An examination of the life and times of important Africana leaders and their legacies to the African world.  Emphasis will be on the major competing trends in the interpretations of the leaders’ legacies and the interests that shape these trends.  Three hours of seminar per week.

AFS 424    Africana Political Thought (3). 

Prerequisite:  AFS 220 is recommended.

Examines political opinions and ideas of Africana thinkers and leaders.  Interrogates Africana political leaders and thinkers' understanding and interpretation of the political dynamics in the African world.

AFS 490    Seminar in Africana Studies
(3).

Prerequisites:  Completion of GWAR and consent of instructor. 

An integrative seminar serving as a capstone to the major in Africana Studies. A research report will be required.  Additionally, other creative projects may be assigned in areas such as art, music composition and performance.  Three hours of seminar per week.

AFS 494    Independent Study  (1-3). 

Prerequisites:  Consent of the instructor; completion of EPT requirement.

Independent study of particular topics in Africana Studies under the direction of a member of the Africana Studies faculty.  Repeatable course.

AFS 495    Seminar on Special Topics in Africana Studies (3). 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Intensive study of an issue, concept or theme in Africana Studies.   May be taken for credit only once for the major.  Repeatable course. 

AFS 496    Internship (3). 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Under the direction of the internship faculty associate, students work in an African diaspora community applying skills and knowledge learned in the classroom, as well as the workplace.   Repeatable course.

AFS 497    Directed Reading (1-3). 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Directed readings on a particular Africana Studies topic or subject area under the direction of a member of the Africana Studies faculty. Repeatable course.

AFS 498    Directed Research (1-3). 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Introduces students to intellectual debates on research methods in Africana Studies.  Focuses on selected articles that discuss different methods of acquiring, interpreting and presenting Africana knowledge. Repeatable course.  

AFS 499    Senior Project (3) FS. 

Prerequisites: ENG 111, AFS 201 and AFS 220 or consent of Department Chair.

In consultation with an Africana Studies faculty, student undertakes a major project such as the following:  original research and thesis on a given African world historical or theoretical topic; a creative project such as an original musical composition, art work or performance with supporting scholarly program notes.

AFS 594    Independent Study  (1-4) FS. 

Prerequisites:  Consent of Department Chair.

Independent investigation of a research problem or directed readings in a selected area of Africana Studies.

AFS 595    Special Topics (3) FS.

Prerequisite:  AFS 201 is recommended.

An intensive study of a concept, movement, school of thought, or individual within the discipline of Africana Studies.  Intended for students with senior or graduate standing.  Specific topic listed in Class Schedule.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

 

ANT 100   Introduction to Cultures (3). 

Examination of the anthropological approach to the study of human behavior.  The concept of culture, cultural institutions and processes, evolution of cultural systems, application of the concept of culture to current social problems. 

ANT 101 Introduction to Biological Anthropology (3) 

Examination of human biology.  Introduces scientific approaches to genetics and evolution, primate evolution and behavior, evidence from fossil record for human evolution, and biological variation among modern humans, human growth and disease patterns, and human demography.

ANT 102 Ancient Civilizations (3).

Examination of origins and development of world civilizations.  Using evidence from the archaeological record, the written record, the arts, literature, and the sciences, human cultural achievements are examined from the earliest beginnings to the sixteenth century.

ANT 310   Culture and Personality:  Psychological Anthropology (3).

Examination of the human personality within cultural contexts.  Topics include personality formation and child-rearing; stress and mental/physical health problems which occur with cultural change; aging, roles and communication among local and worldwide ethnic groups.

ANT 312   Language and Culture (3).

Analysis of language as an aspect of culture.  Relationship between language and culture patterns, dynamics of language and cultural change; the problem of meaning.

ANT 313   Methods and Techniques of Archaeology (3). 

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

Basic procedures and techniques used by archaeologists to excavate, analyze and interpret prehistoric remains.  Field and/or laboratory activities.  Variable topics will include field procedures, laboratory procedures or archaeological method and theories.  Six hours of activity per week.

ANT 315   Magic and Religion  (3).

A comparative analysis of magico-religious systems in their cultural setting and the role of the supernatural in human societies. 

ANT 330   North American Indians (3). 

Comparative study of cultural patterns of selected past and present native peoples of the United States and Canada. 

ANT 333   Ancient Peoples of Mexico and Guatemala (3).

The history and archaeology of cultures of Central Mexico and Guatemala.  Alternating topics include the rise of the Olmecs to the establishment of Teotihuacan and Tenochtitlan and the rise of Izapa to the development of classic and Postclassic Maya Civilization.

ANT 335   Comparative Cultures (3).

The world’s cultural and social diversity from a sociocultural anthropological perspective.  Variable topics include regional surveys (North America, South America, Africa, Eurasia) and/or selected themes in the study of culture.  Repeatable course with alternate topics.

ANT 341Folklore (3). 

Theory and method in the study and collection of folktales, myths, legends, proverbs, riddles, and other forms of verbal tradition.

ANT 344   Aging in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3).

Survey and analysis of cultural influences on the physical and social processes of aging. Examination and comparison of societal roles available to and assumed by older men and women of various cultures. 

ANT 350   Prehistory of Africa and Eurasia (3). 

Examination of the archaeological record of the Old World (Europe, Africa, Asia).  Emphasis on the study and critical analysis of excavated materials, processes of culture change, and reconstructions of social patterns.  Variable topics will include the prehistory of different culture areas and chronological periods.  Repeatable course. 

ANT 351   Prehistory of  the Americas (3) . 

Examination of the archaeological record of the New World (North America, Mesoamerica, and Andean area).  Emphasis on critical analysis of excavated materials, processes of culture change, and reconstructions of social patterns.  Variable topics will include the prehistory of different culture areas and chronological periods. Repeatable course. 

ANT 370   Peoples of the Old World (3).

A survey of one or more cultural regions of the old World. Specific topics and areas may vary; for example:  Europe, Sub-Saharan Africa, Middle East, India, Asia, Southeast Asia, Pacific.  Repeatable course. 

ANT 375   Ethnographic Methods and Techniques (3). 

Prerequisite:  ANT 100.

Basic methods in the ethnographic study of contemporary communities.  Students conduct supervised field work using audiovisual recording and computer techniques to collect and analyze data.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity (including computer lab) per week.

ANT 388   Anthropological Theories of Behavior (3).

Prerequisite:   One course in Anthropology.

Historical survey and critical analysis of major schools of anthropological thought employed in explaining sociocultural behavior and phenomena.  An integrative examination of current developments, issues and applications of the field of anthropology.

ANT 389   Transmission of Culture (3).

Examination of the concept of culture; emphasis on exploration of cross-cultural commonalities and differences in societal responses. Analysis of dynamics of cultural change with reference to ethnic and immigrant groups and institutions in America today.  Topics include roles, institutions, educational processes, family interaction and structure of social systems. 

ANT 494   Independent Study (2,3).

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

Independent study of a particular problem under the direction of a member of the anthropology department.  Repeatable course. 

ANT 495   Selected Topics in              Anthropology (3).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

An intensive study of an issue, concept or theory in anthropology that is of special interest to both the faculty member and the students.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of lecture per week.

 

ANT 115   Introduction to Archaeology and Physical Anthropology (3).

Introduction to archaeological methodology and human biology.  Review of fossil evidence for the biological evolution of humans and archaeological evidence for the major stages in cultural development.

ANT 345   Medical Anthropology (3). 

Cross-cultural survey of   critical problems common to anthropology and health-related fields; cultural ecology of health and pathology, folk medical practices; medical beliefs in relation to other aspects of culture; public health and medical education problems as affected by ethnic culture; effects of acculturation upon mental and physical health. 

ANT 346   Anthropology of Work (3).

Examination of the significance of work in contemporary societies.  Cross-cultural comparisons of workers' life styles.  Impact of changing cultural conditions on work patterns. 

ANT 348   Society and Automated Technologies (3).

Examination of the ramifications of the installation of automated systems on social and economic conditions of contemporary and future societies.  Analyses of culture change issues and the interrelationships between automated technologies and lifestyles. 

ANT 349   Anthropology of the Future (3). 

Examination of newly emerging questions and ideas about the cultural future of humankind.  Topics of discussion include the relevance of anthropology to building a Solar System culture, the possibility of extraterrestrial contact, and alternative cultural futures.

 APS 300 Ethos of the Liberal Arts and the Role of Work (3).

Examines the relationship between liberal arts and sciences education and the competencies required to function effectively in social and occupational settings.  Readings and assignments emphasize integration and application of skills, knowledge, perspectives, and values acquired through liberal arts and sciences.

APS 490   Seminar in Occupational Leadership (3).

Prerequisites:  Senior Standing.

Required of all applied studies majors.  Interdisciplinary analysis of leadership in selected occupational areas.  Creation and presentation of student portfolios demonstrating occupational accomplishment.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ART 100   Looking at Art (3).

Learning to perceive art through discussion of selected historical periods, development of a descriptive vocabulary, and observation of actual works of art. Introduction to theories of interpretation and evaluation. 

ART 101   Experiencing Creative Art (3).

Learning modes of artistic expression through discussion of theories of composition, examination of the lives and goals of selected artists and art movements, and creation of individual and group art projects.  Discussion of projects to develop skills in art criticism. 

ART 110   Introduction to World Art I  (3).

An overview of the major works of art and architecture from Prehistoric times through the Middle Ages around the world.  Each style of art is related to the society which produced it. 

ART 111   Introduction to World Art II (3).

Prerequisite: ART 110 is recommended.

An overview of the major works of art and architecture from the Renaissance through the Modern Period.  Each style of art is related to the society which produced it.

ART 150   Ceramics I (3).

History of and introduction to ceramics design problems with ceramic materials emphasizing hand forming.  Familiarization with low and high firing techniques. Six hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

ART 160   Introduction to Graphic Application (3).

Introduction to the Macintosh platform, graphic interface, and professional level graphic applications such as Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, and QuarkXPress.  Six hours of activity per week.

ART 170   2-D Composition (3).

Principles of design as they relate to two dimensional elements (point, line, shape, texture, color, etc.) and their composition on the pictorial surface. Introduction to various two-dimensional media.  Six hours of activity per week.

ART 171   3-D Composition (3).

Principles of design as they relate to the three-dimensional elements (line, plane, volume, color) and their composition in space.  Six hours of activity per week.

ART 179   Drawing I (3).

A foundation course in drawing, oriented to understanding and use of various systems of graphic representation.  Six hours of activity per week.

ART 180   Painting I (3).

A foundation course introducing the student to problems of pictorial space, organization, and color through the use of two-dimensional painting media.  Six hours of activity per week.

ART 190   Sculpture I (3).

Basic theory and methods of creating sculptural form by additive processes.  Emphasis on clay modeling and waste-mold casting.  Six hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

                        

ART 301   Arts and Crafts for the Non-Major (3).

Development, experience, and application of arts and crafts projects of special value to Liberal Studies and Recreation majors.  Six hours of activity per week.

ART 322   Early European Art (3).

Prerequisites:  ART 110 and ART 111.

A selected exploration of the visual arts and cultures of Ancient Greece and Rome and the Medieval period, and a more concentrated examination of their influences upon the Northern and Italian Renaissances. 

ART 323   Late European Art  (3).

Prerequisites:  ART 110 and ART 111.

The painting, sculpture, and architecture of Western Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries. 

ART 331   Modern Art and Culture (3).

Prerequisites:  ART 110 and ART 111.

History of nineteenth and twentieth-century visual arts presented in a historical context, showing social and philosophical influences and parallels with contemporary literary, dramatic, and musical arts. 

ART 332   Modern Architecture                            (3).

Prerequisites:  ART 110 and ART 111.

History of the technological and stylistic developments in the architecture of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

ART 333   Contemporary Art and Culture (3).

Prerequisites:  ART 110 and ART 111.

The visual arts since 1945 presented in a cultural context, showing social and philosophical influences and parallels with literary and musical arts.  Includes selected minority artists such as Romaire Bearden and Tamayo. 

ART 335   Interactive Multimedia (3).

Prerequisites:  ART 160 or consent of instructor.

Fundamentals of interactive media.  Use of software applicable to motion and multimedia digital graphics such as Flash, Deramweaver, and Director.  Activities will include design for web sites, CDROM and DVD applications, multimedia projects, etc.  Six hours of activity per week.

ART 337   Asian Art (3).

Prerequisites: ART 110 and ART 111.

A study of the visual arts of China, Korea, and Japan.

ART 341   Sources of Graphic Design (3).

Study of relevant sources, events and personalities in the history of graphic design.  Activities will include readings, research, and related projects.  Six hours of activity per week.

ART 342   Conceptualization (3).

Prerequisite: ART 170.

Exploration of the creative processes used in graphic design.  Activities will include creative thinking exercises, research reports, idea sketching, and other creative problem solving techniques. Six hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

ART 343   Prepress (3).

Prerequisite:  ART 160 and ART 170.

Introduction to concerns, terms, procedures, and graphic applications used in the preparation of graphic design print media projects for commercial printing.  Activities will involve some creative design work, but have intensive computer activities.  Six hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

ART 344   Design Practices I (3).

Prerequisite:  ART 160 and ART 170, or consent of instructor.

Introduction to terms and processes used in the design of print media.  Emphasis on graphic projects such as brochures, posters, logos and advertising, etc.  Activities include traditional graphic skills and graphic computer applications.  Six hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

ART 345   Digital Graphics I (3).

Prerequisite:  ART 160 or consent of instructor.

Introduction to digital concepts as applied to screen-based projects involving still images and movement-based images (animation and video).  Activities will include the use of digital graphic application such as Photoshop, After Effects, Premiere, etc.  Six hours of activity per week. Fee required.

ART 346   Digital Graphics II (3). 

Prerequisite:  ART 345.

Advanced course in motion-based digital graphics focusing on the expression of concepts, ideas, and stories for animation and video based projects.  Students will work independently on individual projects from concept to final digital output using a variety of graphic and movement-based applications.  Repeatable course.  Six hours of activity per week. Fee required.

ART 347   Typography (3). 

Prerequisites:  ART 344 or consent of instructor.

Introduction to and study of typography as legible symbols and aesthetic images.  Emphasis on the use and effect of typography in the graphic context of print media and digital graphics.  Activities include studying typography from a traditional hands-on approach to digital rendering.  Six hours of activity per week.

ART 350   Art of the United States (3).

Prerequisites:  ART 110 and ART 111.

A study of the Colonial, Georgian, Federal and 19th century art and architecture in the United States. 

ART 353   Art of California and the Southwest (3). 

Prerequisites:  ART 110 and ART 111.

The art and architecture of California, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas from prehistory to the twentieth century. 

ART 361   Ceramics II (3).

Prerequisite:  ART 150.

Emphasis on wheel-throwing techniques.  Investigation of clay and glaze compounds.  Study of firing techniques for surface enrichment. Six hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

ART 363   Latin American Art  (3).

Prerequisites: ART 110 and ART 111.

A study of the visual arts of Pre-Colombian and Colonial periods in various Latin American countries.

ART 365   African Art and Culture (3).

Prerequisites:  ART 110 and ART 111.

A study of the arts and cultures of Africa from the earliest societies to the present ones.  The Nok, Benin, Ite, and Ashanti cultures will be included. 

ART 368   Women in Art (3).

Prerequisites:  ART 110 and ART 111.

A study of women as artists from the medieval period to the present with special emphasis given to women artists of the twentieth. 

ART 371   Drawing II (3).

Prerequisite:  ART 179.

Development of skill in graphic representation, stressing an understanding of pictorial space and organization.  Problems of technique and media.  Six hours of activity per week.

ART 373   Life Drawing I (3).

Prerequisite:  ART 179. 

Development of the graphic representation of the human form. Live models used to introduce problems of form, structure, and anatomy.  Six hours of activity per week.

ART 380   Painting II (3).

Prerequisites:  ART 170 and ART 180.

Problems in the creative use of the materials of painting. Emphasis on visual concepts, interpretation, and expression.  Six hours of activity per week.

ART 384   Painting III (3).

Prerequisite:  ART 380.

Development of a more comprehensive understanding of materials and methods as they related to current concepts of painting. Six hours of activity per week.

ART 389   The Human Form in Sculpture (3).

Prerequisite:  ART 190 or ART 373. 

Structural and symbolic interpretation of human form from a live model.  Anatomy as it relates to sculptural expression.  Repeatable course.  Six hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

ART 392   Mixed Media Sculpture (3).

Prerequisite:  ART 171 or ART 190. 

Experiments in contemporary sculpture using found objects and other readily available materials.  Introduction to wood and metal fabricating.  Repeatable course.  Six hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

ART 446   Design Practices II (3).

Prerequisites:  ART 344 and ART 347.

A continuation of ART 344 and ART 347, emphasizing the creative application of design skills in print media. Activities centered on advanced work with effective use of design images and compositions, plus research and presentation techniques.  Six hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

ART 447   Design Practices III (3).

Prerequisite:  ART446.

Advanced study of print media design emphasizing creativity and professional standards.  Course activities include graphic design project development, project research, design client interaction, project presentation, and independent student work. Six hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

ART 448   Portfolio (3). 

Prerequisites:  Senior standing and consent of instructor

Capstone course involving preparation of essential material for seeking a position in graphic design.  Emphasizes the preparation of a graphic design portfolio and resume.  Six hours of activity per week. Fee required.

ART 463   Ceramics III (3).

Prerequisite:  ART 361.

Advanced problems in techniques and aesthetic development in all aspects of the process of ceramics.  Repeatable course.  Six hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

ART 474   Life Drawing II (3).

Prerequisite:  ART 373. 

An advanced course in the graphic study of the human figure. Emphasis upon the creative interpretation of form and structure through media.  Repeatable course.  Six hours of activity per week.

ART 486   Painting IV (3).

Prerequisite:  ART 384.

Advanced study emphasizing aesthetic development, personal imagery, and individual critical awareness.  Self-initiated studio problems. Repeatable course.  Six hours of activity per week.

ART 490   Seminar in Theories of Art Criticism (3). 

Prerequisites:  Senior standing as an Art major or minor; consent of instructor and department chair.  ART 110 and ART 111.

Various approaches to art criticism through out the centuries with particular emphasis on contemporary problems of criticism.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ART 493   Special Studies in Art (3). 

Detailed study of material, method, concept, or period of Art.  Repeatable course.  Six hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

ART 494   Independent Study in Art (1-3).

Prerequisites:   Senior standing as an Art major or minor is required; consent of instructor and department chair. 

ART 494 may not be substituted for a required course in the major or minor without prior consent of instructor and adviser.  An art project undertaken with the advice and supervision of a Studio or Design Art faculty member.  Repeatable course. 

ART 495   Special Studies in Art History (3).

Prerequisites: ART 110 and ART 111.

Detailed study of a period, area, figure or movement in the history of art.  Repeatable course. 

ART 496   Internship in Art (1-3).

Prerequisites:  Upper division standing and consent of instructor.

Supervised on- or off-campus art related work in selected museums, galleries, art and slide libraries, studios or commercial firms.  Practical application of knowledge to such areas as exhibition, conservation, cataloging, and Art History, Studio or Design activity.  Term paper required.  Repeatable course. 

ART 498   Directed Research in Art History         (1-3).

Prerequisites:  Senior standing as an Art major or minor is required; consent of instructor and department chair.

Preparation of a research paper on a selected topic in the History of Art.  Repeatable course.

                                

ART 376   Intaglio I (3).

Prerequisite:  ART 179 is recommended.

A foundation course in intaglio printmaking, introducing the processes of aquatint, soft ground, and hard ground etching.  Six hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

ART 379   Lithography I (3).

Prerequisite:  ART 179 is recommended.

An introduction to the basic techniques of lithographic print- making processes.  Six hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

ART 383   Silkscreen (3).

An introduction to basic stencil printmaking processes.  Repeatable course.  Six hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

ART 482   Lithography II (3).

Prerequisite:  ART 379.

Special projects in selected aspects of lithographic printmaking. Repeatable course.  Six hours of activity per week. 
Fee required.

                           

APP 101   Introduction to Asian-Pacific  Studies (3). 

Basic themes and key issues in Asia and the Pacific region.  Multi-disciplinary survey of art, literature, philosophy, religion, politics, and society.  Background to understanding tradition and change in the region, and introduction to the multicultural roots of Asian-Pacific Americans. 

APP 295   Special Topics  in Asian-Pacific Studies (3). 

A study of selected topics or issues in Asian-Pacific Studies. Repeatable for a maximum of six units for credit.

APP 301   Asian-Pacific Populations in Contemporary American Society  (3).

Survey of Asian-Pacific populations in contemporary American society.  Emphasizes emerging trends, demographics, cultural conflicts, and adjustments and identity problems of Asian-Pacific groups. 

APP 321   Asian-Pacific Art, Music and Literature (3).

Examination of Asian-Pacific cultures and history through art, music, and written and oral literatures.  Contributions of past and present artists and writers to the establishment of cultural identities. 

APP 322   Values and Communication of Asian-Pacific Cultures (3). 

Analysis of basic values and societal outlooks unique to various Asian-Pacific groups.  Evaluation of verbal and nonverbal communication modes for cross-cultural understanding. 

APP 395  Special Topics  in Asian-Pacific Studies (3). 

Prerequisite:  Consent of program coordinator.

 An intensive  study of an issue, concept or theme in Asian-Pacific Studies.  Repeatable for a maximum of six units for credit.

APP 490   Seminar:  Asian-Pacific Issues (3).

Prerequisites:  APP 301 and APP 321.

Capstone experience in Asian-Pacific concentration.  In-depth study and project development of historical or current issues confronting Asian-Pacific populations.  Three hours of seminar per week.

APP 494   Independent Study  (1-3).

Independent study of a particular topic in Asian/Pacific Studies, relating two or more disciplines, such as anthropology, art, education, history, languages, music, philosophy, politics, or sociology under the direction of an Asian/Pacific Studies Program faculty member.  Repeatable course.

APP 495   Selected Topics (3).

An intensive study of selected topics or issues in Asian-Pacific studies. 

                 

BEH 490   Seminar in Behavioral Science (3).

Prerequisites: Senior standing and consent of instructor. 

A seminar designed to integrate previous course work by approaching selected problems from the perspective of the various behavioral sciences.  Preparation of seminar paper.  Three hours of seminar
per week.

                

BEH 505   Seminar:  Computer Applications  (4).

The use of microcomputers in the behavioral sciences.  Special attention to qualitative analysis of internet resources and to quantitative analysis using spread sheets and statistical analysis software.  The impact of computer technology on culture and professional practice.  Four hours of seminar per week.

BEH 507   Seminar: Research Design and Interpretation  (3).

Consideration of research methods used in the behavioral sciences.  Elements of research design including problem formulation; sampling, data collection, instrument development; problems of reliability and validity; selection, calculation, and interpretation of appropriate descriptive and inferential statistics.  Three hours of seminar per week.

GRN 550  Seminar in Theories of Gerontology (3). 

Prerequisite: At least one of the following: SOC 355, PSY 305, or PSY 360.  Also, at least one of the following: SOC 316, PSY 352, or ANT 344. 

Functions, goals, and development of theory; discussion and critical examination of biological, psychological, and sociological theories of aging.  Three hours of seminar per week.

GRN 552  Seminar: Organizational  Administration (3). 

Clarification of organizational goals, initiating fund raising, marketing, and the administration of organizations to provide needed community services.  Three hours of seminar per week.

GRN 555  Seminar in Social Policy and Economics of Aging (3). 

Prerequisite: GRN 550. 

Overview of existing programs and funding resources emphasizing major legislation affecting older adults, e.g., social security, Older Americans Act, and MediCal.  Economic implications for individuals, communities and the nation.  Demands for goods and services and consumer patterns for the aging population.  Three hours of seminar per week.

GRN 558  Seminar in Life Options and Retirement Planning (3). 

Study of techniques of advising individuals and groups about adjustments to retirement and sharing of information about options in later life including changing personal and social relationships, financial planning, housing, government benefits, pensions,  legal issues, e.g., wills, medical forms.  Three hours of seminar per week.

GRN 563  Seminar in Community Services for the Elderly (3). 

Assessment of changing needs and special issues for communities.  Identification of community resources and their mobilization and organization.  Action strategies such as establishment of nonprofit corporations, lobbying, advisory councils, volunteers,  peer counseling, and development of professionals and new careers.  Three hours of seminar per week.

GRN 565  Seminar in Long-term Care for the Elderly (3) S. 

Overview of programs and facilities available for aged and frail elderly population.  Special issues, present patterns, and future trends in this field are explored.  Assessment models for individuals and groups requiring special attention will be presented.  Three hours of seminar per week.

GRN 567  Death and Dying: Perspectives from the Behavioral Sciences (3) S. 

Personal and social attitudes toward death, reactions of the terminally ill, grief, the funeral, effects of war and holocaust, implications of life prolonging advances in technology from psychological, sociological and cross-cultural perspectives. 

GRN 569  Internship in Gerontology (3) FS. 

Prerequisites: GRN 550 and 6 additional units of graduate study. 

Students will be directed to appropriate agencies and centers to work as interns within their chosen area of specialization.  Regular meetings scheduled with a faculty internship supervisor to assess student progress.  Repeatable for credit up to six units.  One hour of seminar per week in addition to internship.

GRN 595  Seminar: Special Topics in Gerontology (1-3). 

Study of a current topic in Behavioral Science.  Repeatable for total of six units.  One to three hours of seminar per week.

GRN 597  Directed Readings  in Gerontology  (3) FS.  

In consultation with a faculty member, completion of readings to prepare for the comprehensive examination; or for orientation to a little known topic; or as background for writing a research, thesis, or project proposal.  CR/NC grading.  Repeatable for total of six units. 

GRN 598  Directed Research in  Gerontology  (3) FS. 

Prerequisites: BEH 507 and BEH 505. 

Conduct of pilot studies, development of research instruments, or similar independent research in preparation for the project or thesis, under the supervision of a faculty member in any area of Behavioral Science.  CR/NC grading.  Repeatable for total of six units.

GRN 599  Thesis or Project in Gerontology (1-3) FS.

Prerequisites: BEH 507 and nine additional units to be approved by the Program Coordinator.

In consultation with a faculty member, writing of a masters thesis or completion of a project in the Behavioral Sciences.  Choice of area requires prior consent of advisor.  Repeatable for credit up to six units.  CR/NC grading.

GRN 600 Graduate Continuation Course (0) FS.

Graduate students who have completed their course work but not their thesis, project, or comprehensive examination, or who have other requirements remaining for the completion of their degree, may maintain continuous attendance by enrolling in this course.  Signature of graduate program coordinator required.

BEH 509   Applied Behavioral Science Research (3) S. 

Prerequisite: BEH 505, BEH 507 and 9 additional units of graduate work.

Application of research design, instrument development,  proposal writing, program planning, and statistics to formulating, completing , and reporting a study of a specified problem.  Four hours of seminar per week.

                      

BIO 102    General Biology (3).

Representative topics in modern biology, emphasizing the present state of knowledge and the major means whereby this knowledge is being expanded. 

BIO 103    General Biology Laboratory (1).

Prerequisite:  BIO 102 or equivalent (may be taken concurrently).

Laboratory work and demonstrations in representative areas of modern biology.  Emphasizes scientific methodology.  Three hours of laboratory per week.

BIO 120    Principles of Biology I (4).

Prerequisite:  CHE 110 or concurrent enrollment.

Introduction to basic biological concepts including structure, organization and function of life at the cellular and molecular levels and the biology of monerans and plants in terms of their structure and function.  Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

BIO 122    Principles of Biology II (4).

Prerequisites: BIO 120, CHE 112 or concurrent enrollment. 

Evolution, life histories, anatomy and physiology of major classes of protozoa, invertebrates and vertebrates.  Low-tide field trip required.  Three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week.

BIO 195    Selected Topics in Biology (2,3).

Introductory course of special interest in Biology for entry level students.  Topic and content will vary as announced.  Two to three hours of lecture per week.  Not open for credit toward the Biology major.  

BIO 230    Evolution (3).

Prerequisite: BIO 122.

Genetic and ecological factors affecting evolution, microevolution and macroevolution, classification systems. 

BIO 250    Elements of Human Anatomy and Physiology               (3).

Prerequisite: BIO 102 or equivalent. 

Basic principles of anatomical structure and physiological processes of human organ systems.  Not open for credit toward the Biology major.  

BIO 251    Elements of Human Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory (1).

Prerequisite: BIO 250 or concurrent enrollment. 

Laboratory work and demonstration in the anatomical structure and processes occurring in man.  Not open for credit toward the Biology major.  Three hours of laboratory per week.

BIO 254    Human Biology (3).

Prerequisite: BIO 102 or equivalent. 

Biological aspects of humans with emphasis on structure and function of organ systems. Additional topics may include human origins, diseases, and health aspects of human genetics and the environment.  Not open for credit towards the Biology major. 

                                       

BIO 310    Plant Physiology (4).

Prerequisites: BIO 122; BIO 230 recommended. 

An introduction to cell metabolism in plants.  Topics include photosynthesis, respiration, amino acid synthesis and lipid metabolism.  Physiology of plants, including hormones, photoperiodism and circadian rhythms, will also be covered.  Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

BIO 312    Animal Physiology (4).

Prerequisites: BIO 122; BIO 230 recommended.

Introduction to comparative animal physiology with emphasis on the vertebrates.  Topics include gas exchange, circulatory function, digestion temperature regulation, metabolism, osmoregulation and excretion.  Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

BIO 314    Embryology (4).

Prerequisites: BIO 122; BIO 230 recommended.

Development of animals from gametogenesis through organogenesis.  Organismic approach to vertebrate embryonic development with emphasis on chick and selected comparison to frog and mammals.  Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

BIO 320    Cell Biology (3).

Prerequisites: BIO 122; CHE 310 & CHE 311 or CHE 316 & CHE 317. 

Structure and function of eukaryotic cells with emphasis on the role of organic macromolecules, mechanisms of energy metabolism, DNA and protein synthesis, protein sorting, endo- and exocytosis, cell signaling, cytoskeletal elements, biotechnology and cell research techniques. 

BIO 324    Microbiology (4).

Prerequisites: BIO 122; CHE 310 & CHE 311 or CHE 316 & CHE 317 recommended.

The morphology, physiology, genetics and classification of microorganisms; applied aspects of microbiology.  Basic bacteriological techniques included in the laboratory.  Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

BIO 332    Ecology (4).

Prerequisites: BIO 122; BIO 230 recommended.

Concepts in ecology including energy flow, biogeochemical cycles, community structure, succession, and population growth and interaction.  Sampling techniques and use of ecological instrumentation learned in laboratory.  Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

BIO 336    Environmental Biology (3).

Prerequisite: BIO 102 or BIO 122. 

Principles of ecology applied to contemporary environmental problems. Emphasis is placed upon human impact in Southern California.  One day (18 hour) field trip is required.  Not open for credit toward the Biology major. 

BIO 340    Genetics (3).

Prerequisites: BIO 122; CHE 310 & CHE 311 or CHE 316 and CHE 317 recommended.

Principles of heredity, gene expression at the molecular and organismic levels, variation and mutation.

BIO 342    Cell and Genetics               Laboratory (1).

Prerequisite:  BIO 320 or BIO 340. 

An introduction to modern techniques of biological research on cell biomolecules and genetics, with emphasis on microscopy, protein isolation and characterization, enzyme activity, electrophoresis of biomolecules, transformation and PCR.  Three hours of laboratory per week.  Fee required.

BIO 346    Human Heredity (3).

Prerequisite: BIO 102 or equivalent. 

Introduction to human genetics, including human reproduction.  Mendelian inheritance, chemical basis of gene action, mutation, and eugenics.  Not open for credit toward the Biology major or to students with credit in BIO 340.  

BIO 360    Marine Biology (3).

Prerequisites: BIO 122; BIO 230 recommended.

Introduction to the biology of marine life; general descriptions of the marine environments, their inhabitants and ecology; emphasis on the plants and animals of the Southern California seashores. Two hours lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

BIO 370    Biological Bases of Human Behavior (3).

Prerequisite:  BIO 102 or equivalent. 

Biological structure and function as it relates to human behavior.  Emphasis on the structure of the central and peripheral nervous systems, sensory systems, neurotransmission, endocrine system and hormones, genetic influences, neuropharmacology and the impact of disease on human behavior.  Not open for credit toward the Biology major. 

BIO 374    Drug Abuse (3).

Prerequisite: BIO 102 or equivalent. 

Introduction to the problem of drug abuse.  The action of commonly abused drugs on the human nervous system will be examined including the physiological and behavioral effects which are produced.  Not open for credit toward the Biology major. 

BIO 380    Biology of Childhood and Adolescence (3).

Prerequisite: BIO 250 or BIO 254. 

The physiology of growth and development through the second decade of life; reproductive maturation and the hormonal regulation of puberty; common illnesses, growth disorders and health hazards, including a brief introduction to venereal diseases and drug abuse.  Not open for credit toward the Biology major. 

BIO 386    Human Aging (3).

Prerequisite: BIO 250 or BIO 254. 

The effects of aging on the structure and physiology of the human body and the effects of drugs used in the treatment of the elderly.  Not open for credit toward the Biology major.  

BIO 394    Independent Study  (1,2).

Prerequisite: BIO 122.

Advanced library, field or laboratory work.  A contract must be signed by the student and supervising faculty. Credit in this course is contingent upon completion of a written report of work accomplished. Not more than three units may be applied toward the Biology major or minor.  Repeatable course. 

BIO 395    Special Topics in Biology (2,3).

Prerequisites: BIO 102 or equivalent and consent of instructor. 

Courses of special interest in Biology for students not majoring in the field. Topic and content will vary as announced. Not open  for credit toward the Biology major.  Repeatable course.  Two or three hours of lecture per week.

BIO 420    Histotechnique (3).

Prerequisite: BIO 122. 

Preparation of tissues for microscopic study, methods of fixation and infiltration with emphasis on paraffin embedding and staining. Two hours of lecture and six hours           of laboratory per week.

BIO 421    Molecular Biology (3).

Prerequisites: BIO 320, BIO 340 and BIO 342.

Recombinant DNA techniques used in the study of genome organization and gene structure, expression and regulation; emphasis on eukaryotic cells.  One hour of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week.

BIO 422    Histology (4).

Prerequisites: BIO 250 or BIO 312, and CHE 310 or CHE 316. 

Microscopic study of the structure and function of cells and tissues and their integration into organs.  Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory  per week.

BIO 425    Medical Bacteriology (4).

Prerequisites: BIO 324, CHE 310 and CHE 311 or CHE 316 and CHE 317. 

Characteristics of bacterial agents in human disease emphasizing host-parasite relationships, epidemiology and infection control, laboratory methods for detection, isolation and identification of medically important bacteria. Two hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week.

BIO 426    Immunology (4).

Prerequisite: BIO 320 or BIO 340;  BIO 342 recommended.

Principles of immunology. Emphasis on the cellular and molecular nature of antigens and immunoglobulins; immunobiology; laboratory immunoassays. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

BIO 428    Virology (3).

Prerequisites: BIO 324 and CHE 310 and CHE 311 or CHE 316 and CHE 317; BIO 425 recommended.

The anatomy, biochemistry, physiology and pathogenesis of bacterial and animal viruses emphasizing virus diseases of humans. Topics include structure, classification, theory and practical aspects of growth, purification and identification, host-virus interactions, tumor viruses and antiviral agents.

BIO 430    Comparative Biology:  A Phylogenetic Approach
(3). 

Prerequisites:  BIO 230 and BIO 340; BIO 332 is recommended. 

Strategies for rigorous comparisons of different species:  Permissions (legal), collection, identification (diagnosis), taxonomy, maintenance-alive and preserved, character state description, phylogenetic analysis and biogeography.  Two hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week.

BIO 440    Molecular Genetics  (3).

Prerequisites:  BIO 320 and BIO 340.

Genome structure in relation to control of gene expression in prokaryotic and eucaryotic cells; interplay between genes and regulatory reactions that control development.  Topics include antibody diversity, neoplastic transformation by oncogenes, and pattern formation. 

BIO 442    Human Genetics (3).

Prerequisites: BIO 320 and BIO 340.  BIO 440 recommended.

Principles of human genetics including cytogenetics, Mendelian inheritance, pedigree construction, complex patterns of inheritance, biochemical defects, gene mapping, hemoglobinopathies, molecular genetics, prenatal diagnosis and gene therapy.

BIO 453    Endocrinology (3).

Prerequisites: BIO 312 and BIO 320.

The role of endocrine glands and tissues in metabolic regulation, environmental adjustment, reproduction, and development of vertebrates, with emphasis on mammals.

BIO 458    Human Parasitology (4).

Prerequisite: BIO 122. 

Physiological aspects of parasites in man, their symbiotic host and parasite relationships and clinical diagnostic techniques. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

BIO 483    Human Physiology (4).

Prerequisite: BIO 312 or BIO 320. 

Advanced lecture and discussion of the functional activities occurring in the human organ systems.

BIO 490    Senior Project (2).

Prerequisites: Senior standing; completion of lower division general education courses, GWAR, statistics, and required courses in the biology major.

Application and assessment of previously learned material in courses required in biology and general education.  Activities such as the design and conduct of an experiment requiring statistical analysis, resume writing, oral presentations on career choices, and critiques of classmates presentations. One hour of seminar and two of activity per week.

BIO 491    Seminar in Biomedical Research (1).

Prerequisite:  CHE 110, CHE 112, BIO 120, BIO 122, CHE 310, CHE 311 or permission of professor.

Current topics in biomedical research presented by CSUDH faculty and prominent scientists from throughout the country.  CR/NC grading.  Repeatable for up to 2 units.

BIO 495    Selected Topics in Biology (2,3).

Prerequisite: BIO 122. 

Advanced course of special interest for students majoring in Biology. May include laboratory exercises. Topic and content will vary as announced. Repeatable course.  Two to three hours of lecture per week.

BIO 501    Biological Literature (3).

Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the Graduation Writing Requirement (GWAR).

Standard forms of presentation of scientific research, including research articles, review papers, abstracts, poster and oral presentations.  Sources of biological literature and contemporary literature search skills as well as data presentation formats and technical writing conventions will be addressed. 

BIO 502    Biostatistics (3).

Prerequisite: MAT 131 or equivalent. 

Application of statistical analyses to biological research with emphasis on experimental design. Analysis of variance, regression and correlation will be the primary topics. Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

BIO 503    Biological Instrumentation (3).

Introduction to the operation and application of common instruments used in biological research.  Emphasis on those instruments available for graduate research.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.

BIO 520    Advances in Cell and Molecular Biology (3).

Prerequisite: BIO 421 or BIO 440.

Current developments in the structure and function of viruses, prokaryotic cells, and eukaryotic cells. Three hours of lecture per week.  Repeatable for credit in biology master’s program for up to six units.

BIO 590    Graduate Seminar (2). 

Presentation and discussion of selected topics in Biological Science. A minimum of two and a maximum of four units may be applied toward the biology master’s degree.   The repeated courses must be taught by different instructors or must be on different topics.  Two hours of seminar per week.

BIO 595    Graduate Selected Topics in Biology (2-3).

Advanced course of special interest to graduate students in Biology.  Topic and content will vary as announced.  Repeatable course.  Two to three hours of lecture per week.

BIO 597    Directed Reading (1-3) FS.

Library research on a specific subject in biology. Topic for study to be approved and directed by instructor.  Can be used to prepare for the comprehensive examinations or to formulate a research problem prior to enrollment in BIO 598 or BIO 599.   A maximum of three units may be applied toward the master’s degree.  Repeatable course. 

BIO 598    Directed Research (1-3) FS. 

Laboratory research on a specific subject in biology. Topic of research to be approved and directed by an instructor. A maximum of three units may be applied toward the  master’s degree.  Repeatable course. 

BIO 599    Thesis (1-4) FS. 

Laboratory research and writing of thesis for the master’s degree. Topic of research to be approved by graduate advisor.  A maximum of 9 units of BIO 597, 598 and 599 combined may be applied toward the master’s degree.  Open only to thesis option graduate students.  Repeatable course.  

BIO 600    Graduate Continuation Course (0) FS.

Graduate students who have completed their course work but not their thesis, project, or comprehensive examinations, or who have             other requirements remaining for the completion of their degree, may maintain continuous attendance by enrolling in this course. Signature of graduate program coordinator required.

                                   

BIO 412    Comparative Vertebrate Biology (4) S-EOY.

Prerequisites: BIO 230 and BIO 312.

Vertebrate evolution, classification and ecology and adaptive morphology will be investigated through observations of behavior, study of fossils, and comparative anatomy dissections.  Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.  Several field trips, including one or more weekend trips required.

BIO 423    Cell Fine Structure (3) F-EOY.

Prerequisite: BIO 320 or BIO 422.

Structure and function of eucaryotic sub-cellular constituents at the light and electron microscopic and biochemical level. 

BIO 427    Clinical Mycology (3).

Prerequisites: BIO 324; BIO 425 recommended.

Comparative morphology, physiology and pathogenicity of medically important fungi. Laboratory methods for identification emphasize interpretation and evaluation of results including the recognition of contaminating or opportunistic organisms. Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

BIO 523    Electron Microscopy  (3)

Prerequisite:  BIO 421.

Theory and use of the electron microscopy preparation of tissue and photographic techniques.  One hour of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week.

                                   

ACC 230  Financial Accounting  (3).

Prerequisite: MAT 009 or equivalent.

A survey of financial statements under existing generally accepted accounting principles.  Emphasis is on underlying concepts, principles, and mechanics to make the statements meaningful to users.  

ACC 231  Managerial Accounting  (3).

Prerequisite: ACC 230.

Accounting for planning and control.  Topics include objectives, terminology, concepts, product costing, cost patterns, cost-volume-profit analysis, contribution margin, profit planning, standard costs, flexible budgets, decentralized operations, relevant costs and uses of accounting data for managerial decision making. 

                                   

ACC 330  Intermediate Accounting I
(3).

Prerequisite: ACC 230.

Professional level accounting, conceptual framework, balance sheet, income statement, compound interest, cash, receivables, inventories, fixed and intangible assets, depreciation, current and contingent liabilities. 

ACC 331  Intermediate Accounting II (3).

Prerequisite: ACC 330.

Professional level accounting, bonds and long-term notes, short-term and long-term investments, capital stock, retained earnings, income recognition, income taxes, postemployment benefits, leases, statement of cash flows, earnings per share, changes and errors, financial analysis.

ACC 333  Income Taxation I (3).

Prerequisite: ACC 230.

Federal income tax law as related to individuals and sole proprietorships. 

ACC  336 Introduction to Internal Auditing (3).

Prerequisite:  ACC 231 and CIS 270.

Survey of contemporary internal auditing with emphasis on financial, compliance, and operational auditing.  Coverage will include audit planning, specific audit techniques, auditing in a computerized environment, emerging issues and report writing.  Course includes case studies and computer applications. 

ACC 337  Cost Accounting (3).

Prerequisite: ACC 231.

The nature, objectives, and procedure of cost accounting and control; job costing and process costing; joint product costing; standard costs; theories of cost allocation and absorption; uses of cost accounting data for management decision making. 

ACC 339  Accounting and Control in Multinational Companies
(3).

Prerequisite: ACC 231.

Study of comparative accounting systems, international accounting standards, currency translation and foreign exchange, transfer pricing, reporting, taxation, auditing and control problems. 

ACC 430  Advanced Accounting (3).

Prerequisite: ACC 331.

Concepts and principles of partnerships, business combinations, accounting for multinational enterprises, and introduction to governmental and nonprofit accounting. 

ACC 431  Governmental and Non-Profit Accounting (3).

Prerequisite: ACC 230.

Nature of fund accounting systems used by governments and nonprofit entities.  Topics include principles underlying fund accounting, budgeting procedures, discussion of types of funds used.  Course requirements include computerized term project. 

ACC 433  Income Taxation II  (3) FS.

Prerequisite: ACC 333.

Federal income tax law as related to partnerships, corporations, estates and trusts; estate and gift taxes.  

ACC 435  Auditing (3) FS.

Prerequisites: ACC 330 and QMS 321.

The audit environment, reports, professional ethics, objectives, evidence and documentation, planning, analytical review, materiality and risk, internal control, attribute and variable sampling, EDP systems, transactions cycles, balance sheet and income statement accounts, compilations, reviews, and other special purpose reports. 

ACC 502  Advanced Topics in Accounting  (3).

Prerequisite:  ACC 230 or equivalent.

Application of functional accounting in contemporary business.  Decision making through the integrated use of financial accounting (reporting to outside interests) and managerial accounting (accounting information for internal decision making) including relevant income tax consequences.  Case analysis oral/written presentation and computer usage required. 

ACC 595  Selected Topics in Accounting (3).

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and ACC 502.

Intensive study of a specialized area of Accounting on a selected topic of particular interest to faculty and students.  Three hours of seminar per week.  Specific topic listed in  class schedule.  Repeatable course.

 

BUS 300   Business Communications (3) FS.

Prerequisite:  ENG 111 is required.  Satisfaction of the junior level competency in writing requirement (GWE score of 7 or better OR a certification writing course such as ENG 350) is strongly recommended.

Introduces the Business Administration student to effective business communication tools and techniques.  Includes all standard forms of contemporary business communication, both written and oral. Students will have weekly written and/or oral assignments with appropriate feedback.  A-C/NC grading.

BUS 445   International Business (3) FS.

Prerequisites: FIN 360, MGT 310 and MKT 350.

An introduction to international business with an emphasis on the additional risks, uncertainties and difficulties of business conducted across national boundaries; examines the financial, management, legal accounting and marketing areas. 

BUS 494   Independent Study in Business (3).

Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and of the business administration advisement coordinator.

Independent research or other study under the direction of a full-time faculty member of the Business Administration Program.  CR/NC grading. Repeatable course. 

BUS 495   Special Topics in Business (1-3).

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

Advanced seminar on a topic of current interest to the discipline of business administration.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

BUS 496   Business Administration Internship (3).

Prerequisites: Upper division status and consent of Internship Coordinator.

Under direction of the Internship Coordinator, students work in a business organization applying skills and knowledge learned in the classroom. CR/NC grading. Repeatable course. 

BUS 594   Independent Study
in Business (3).

Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and MBA program coordinator.

Independent research or special projects under the direction of a full-time faculty member of the master of business administration program. CR/NC grading.  NOTE:  Cannot substitute for a required course or elective.

BUS 595   Selected Topics in Business (1-3) FS.

Prerequisite: Completion of core courses.

A variable topics course in a functional area of business administration or of special interest to business management.  New topics will be offered each term. Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

BUS 600   Graduate Continuation Course (0) FS.

Prerequisite: Consent of graduate program coordinator required.

Graduate students who have completed their course work but not their thesis project or comprehensive examinations or who have other requirements remaining for the completion of their degree may maintain continuous attendance by enrolling in this course.

                                   

CIS 270    Information Systems and Technology Fundamentals (3) FS.

Provides an introduction to information technology, systems concepts, and application software.  Covers system components and relationships, cost/value and quality of information, and package software solutions.  Includes basic skills related to operating systems, word processing, spreadsheet software, and the Internet. 

CIS 272    Business Programming I (3) FS.

Prerequisite: CIS 270 or CSC 111 or CSC 121 (may be taken concurrently).

Provides an understanding of algorithm development, programming, computer concepts and the design and application of data and file structure.  Topics include file processing, data analysis, form design, and report generation. 

CIS 275    Introduction to Network-Based Applications (3) FS.

Prerequisite: CIS 270 or CSC 111 or CSC 121 or be taken concurrently. 

Introduction to Internet Protocol networks, WWW authoring and design, HTML, multimedia data types, social, and organizational implications of networks. 

CIS 276    Personal Productivity with Information Systems Technology (3)

Prerequisite: CIS 270

Enables student to improve their skills as knowledge workers through effective and efficient use of productivity software.  Covers advanced features of word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, database, and groupware, including applications development. 

                                   

                                   

CIS 370    Information Systems Theory and Practice (3) FS.

Prerequisite: CIS 270 or CSC 111 or CSC 121.

Provides an introduction to organizational systems, planning, and decision process, and how information is used for decision support in organization.  Covers the concepts of information systems for competitive advantage, data as a resource, quality control and reengineering, management and development of systems, and end-user  computing. 

CIS 371    Business Programming II (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 272.

Analysis, design, and development of business applications using object-oriented programming languages.  Topics include GUI interface, application optimization, client/server applications, ad hoc queries, and dynamic link libraries. 

CIS 372    Analysis and Logical Design (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 370  may be taken concurrently.

Business computing systems, with emphasis on system analysis; tools and techniques of systems study; problem definition, data requirements and analytical approaches.

CIS 471    Advanced , Network-Based Applications (3).

Prerequisites:  CIS 275.

Covers network-based applications in commerce and cooperative work.  Internet publishing and commerce, Internet Protocol servers, database connectivity, computer support of cooperative work. 

CIS 473    Data Base Systems (3).

Prerequisites: CIS 272 and CIS 370; CIS 272 may be taken concurrently.

Concepts of data structures and data base processing; major approaches to design and implementation of data base applications; discussion of commercial systems. 

CIS 474    Systems Development (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 372; may be taken concurrently.

Business computing systems, with emphasis on systems design; prediction and evaluation of system performance; management information systems and related systems;  use of telecommunications in systems design. 

CIS 475    Data Communications (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 370

History and trends of hardware/software for telecommunications; asynchronous and synchronous protocols; codes; case studies of current commercial applications; distributed processing; carriers, services and regulatory agencies; standards; error management; reliability; design and tuning of networks; security. 

CIS 476    Advanced Concepts for Business Systems  (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 370.

Special topics from modern computing developments.  Special emphasis will be given to topics not included in other course offerings (e.g., decision support systems, videotex, etc.).  Repeatable course.

CIS 477    Advanced Data Communications  (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 370 and CIS 475

Covers advanced topics required to design, implement, and maintain networks, including the advanced aspects of protocol models, IP addressing, routing, subnetting, and the configuration and operation of network devices. 

CIS 480    Advanced Data Base  Systems  (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 473.

Advanced database concepts such as object-relational database management systems, client/server and n-tier database environments, data warehousing, an Intrantet- and Internet-based database systems.  Projects include integrated commercial database applications using forms, reports, graphics, and web pages.

CIS 494    Independent Study in Computer Information Systems (3).

Prerequisites: CIS 372, minimum GPA 3.0, and upper division standing.

Independent research or special project under the direction of a full-time faculty member in the Computer Information Systems Department. CR/NC grading.

CIS 496    Internship in Computer Information Systems  (3).

Prerequisites: Minimum GPA 3.0.

A project-type course in computer information systems carried out on an independent basis, with the cooperation of an industrial or governmental concern that is active in the CIS field. Professional report describing project is required. CR/NC grading.

                                   

CIS 502    Advanced Topics in Information Systems (3).

Prerequisite:  CIS 270.

Covers issues of concern to managers in areas such as information processing applications and technology, management of the information processing function, impacts of information technology on the firm and on society, global information systems and the information superhighway. 

CIS 594    Independent Study in Computer Information Systems (3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of the instructor and MBA program coordinator.

Independent research or other study under the direction of a full-time faculty member of the Computer Information Systems Department.  CR/NC grading. Repeatable course.

CIS 595    Selected Topics In Computer  Information Systems (3).

Prerequisites:  Graduate Standing and CIS 502

Intensive study of a specialized area of Computer Information Systems on a selected topic of particular interest to faculty and students.  Three hours of seminar per week.  Specific topic listed in class schedule.  Repeatable course.

FIN 360    Business Finance (3).

Prerequisite: ACC 230, ECO 210, and one of the following,  MAT 105, MAT, 131, MAT 153, MAT 171, MAT 191, or MAT 193.

A survey of the decision framework for financial management; forecasting and planning, major investment and financing decisions, control and interaction with capital markets. 

FIN 375    Personal Financial Planning (3).

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor. Provides an understanding of personal finance issues relating to budgeting, planning credit, retirement planning, insurance investments, and estate planning.  Students will be able to adopt principles studied to their personal lives and make better decisions.

                                   

FIN 382    Financial Analysis I  (3).

Prerequisite: FIN 360.

Readings and case studies in financial theory and practice relating to financial statement analysis, budgeting, working capital management; computer applications. 

FIN 425    Security Analysis (3).

Prerequisite:  FIN 360; FIN 468 is recommended.

Students will learn the rational, rigorous analysis that is needed to evaluate securities and to answer the most important question:  Are securities fairly valued?  Students will also learn how to value securities, diversification and performance evaluation of portfolios.

FIN 467    Real Estate Finance  and Investment (3).

Prerequisite: FIN 360.

Practical analysis of financial techniques and investment opportunities and procedures for real property; investigation of costs, returns, profitability, tax implications, depreciation, financial institutions, markets, instruments, agencies of real estate finance, uses of computerized analysis. 

FIN 468    Seminar in Investment Analysis (3).

Prerequisite: FIN 360.

Security analysis, valuation and portfolio management; emphasis on investment criteria, sources of information, types of financial investments.  Three hours of seminar per week.

FIN 480    Economics of the Firm (3).

Prerequisites: ECO 210, ECO 211 and QMS 321.

Applications of economic theory to management decisions; emphasis on analysis and quantitative techniques appropriate for solving forecasting, production, cost and pricing problems under various market conditions; computer applications when appropriate. 

FIN 481    Financial Institutions Management (3).

Prerequisite: FIN 360.

Management of financial institutions, including principles, practices and procedures financing, international capital asset pricing model and ethical concerns.  Case analysis, oral/written presentation and computer usage required. 

FIN 483    Financial Analysis II  (3).

Prerequisite: FIN 382.

Readings and case studies in financial theory and practice relating to investment decisions, mergers and acquisitions, multinational finance, computer applications. 

FIN 484    Business Forecasting  (3).

Prerequisites: FIN 360 and QMS 321.

Techniques for estimation of sales, investment, working capital, inventories and labor requirements; naive forecasts, moving averages, exponential smoothing, regression techniques, and time series analysis. 

FIN 488    Multinational Financial Transactions (3).

Prerequisite: FIN 360.

Short term export and import financing, including the fundamentals of foreign exchange, commercial drafts, and letters of credit; international banking procedures, private and public sources, and problems of risk and security. 

FIN 494    Independent Study in Finance (3).

Independent study of particular topics in Finance under the direction of a full time member of the Finance Department. CR/NC grading.

FIN 496    Internship in Finance (3).

Under the direction of the Internship Coordinator, students work in a business organization applying the skills and knowledge learned in the classroom. CR/NC grading.

FIN 500    Advanced Topics in Finance (3).

Prerequisite:  FIN 360.

Analysis of decisions in financial management.  Includes financial planning, working capital management, capital budgeting, valuation analysis, portfolio management, capital structure, ethical and multinational concerns.  Case analysis, oral/written presentation and computer usage required. 

FIN 502    Advanced Topics in International Business (3).

Prerequisite:  FIN 360.

Exploration of issues related to all functional areas within a global business environment.  Emphasizes the additional opportunities, risks, uncertainties and difficulties of conducting business across national boundaries.  Case analysis, oral/written presentation and computer usage required. 

FIN 503    Advanced Topics in Multinational Finance (3).

Prerequisite:  FIN 502.

Financial decision making in global setting:  financial systems, Euro-currency markets, balance of payments, foreign exchange markets, risk measurement, hedging, trade

FIN 504    Corporate Finance-Valuation Approach (3).

Prerequisite:  FIN 500.

Principles of valuation; projecting earnings; discounting future cash flows; the price/earnings method; dividend discount model; market value vs. replacement value; the role of premiums when buying public companies; financing alternatives.

FIN 505    Advanced Management of Financial Institutions (3).

Prerequisite:  FIN 500.

An examination of the nature and role of financial institutions in the economy, money markets, and capital markets, the Federal Reserve System and monetary policy, the commercial banking system, thrift institutions, insurance companies, pension funds, investment companies, and other major financial institutions.

FIN 506    Investment and Portfolio Management (3).

Prerequisite:  FIN 500.

An overview of the investment environment for the institutional money manager.  The market mechanism, market equilibrium, the relationship between risk and return and the valuation of various investment instruments are investigated.  Analyzes contemporary theories and techniques of security selection and management available to the institution portfolio manager.

FIN 507    Derivatives and Future Markets (3).

Prerequisite:  FIN 500.

Futures markets; mechanics of buying and selling futures; options; pricing of options; hedging; regulation of futures markets; stock index futures; interest rate futures; interest rate and other swaps.

FIN 595    Selected Topics in Finance (3).

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and FIN 500.

Intensive study of a specialized area of Finance on a selected topic of particular interest to faculty and students.  Three  hours of seminar per week.  Specific topic listed in class schedule.  Repeatable course.

LAW 240  Legal Environment of Business (3).

Analysis of the legal process; functions and operations within a federal system; contracts; sales; tort liability as it impacts business; government regulation of business. 

                                   

LAW 340  Law of Business Organizations (3).

Legal consequences of selection of one form of business organization over another; analysis of the law of corporations, partnerships, and agencies; law of the workplace; corporate ethics and social responsibilities. 

LAW 342  Employment Law (3).

Prerequisites: LAW 240 is recommended.

Overview of the laws impacting the workplace; anti-discrimination law; employee safety, health and privacy; the employer-employee contract; labor law; regulatory agencies; retirement compensation; other statutory rights.

LAW 595  Special Topics in Law (3).

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing

Intensive study of a specialized area of Law on a selected topic of particular interest to faculty and students.  Three hours of seminar per week.  Specific topic listed in class schedule.  Repeatable course.

                                   

MGT 310  Management Theory (3).

Focuses on the management processes of planning, organizing, leading, and controllng; includes discussions of social and ethical issues in business; case studies and written reports. 

MGT 312  Organizational Behavior (3).

Prerequisite: MGT 310.

Causes and consequences of individual and group behavior in business, organizational communications, interpersonal relations, and conflict resolution; cases and role-playing. 

MGT 313  Human Resource Management (3).

Prerequisite: MGT 310.

Current theory and practice of the personnel function in organizations.  Includes job analysis, recruiting, selection, training and development, compensation, performance evaluation and contemporary quality of work life issues and job redesign; uses case analysis, lecture and role-playing. 

MGT 316  Labor and Industrial  Relations (3).

Prerequisite: MGT 310.

The Labor/Management process in private sector organizations; development of employee organizations; collective bargaining; contract administration; labor law, labor economics; role of the NLRB and the FMCS; case analysis and role-playing. 

MGT 412  Small Business Management (3).

Prerequisites: ACC 230, MGT 310 and MKT 350.

Role of small business in America; project- oriented activities include establishing, financing and operating independent  businesses; designed to develop entrepreneurial skills and insights into managing a small business. 

MGT 416  Leadership (3).

Prerequisite: MGT 312.

An in-depth analysis of theories and practice of leadership.  Course is designed to give the student an understanding of the leadership skills, styles, and behavior in a variety of managerial roles.

MGT 418  Seminar in Comparative Management Systems (3).

Prerequisite: MGT 310.

Study of management processes such as planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling under conditions other than those found today in the United States.  Countries studied vary from year to year; case analysis and class projects.  Three hour of seminar per week.

MGT 490  Strategic Management Seminar  (3).

Prerequisites: Completion of all business core courses; BUS 445, FIN 480, and QMS 423 may be taken concurrently (priority will be given to graduating seniors).

An integrating capstone course dealing with problems of business management; uses actual business cases for analysis and decision-making. 

MGT 494  Independent Study in Management (3).

Prerequisite:  Completion of at least two management concentration courses and approval of the Department Chair.

Independent study of particular topics in Management under the direction of a full-time faculty member of the Business Administration Program.  CR/NC grading. Repeatable course.

MGT 495  Special Topics in Management (3).

Prerequisites: MGT 310

Study of a current topic in Management.  Repeatable course. MGT 496             Internship in Management (3)

MGT 496  Internship in Management (3).

Prerequisite:  Completion of at least two management concentration courses and approval of the Department Chair.

Under the direction of the Internship Coordinator, students work in a business organization applying skills and knowledge learned in the classroom.  CR/NC grading.  Repeatable course.

                                   

MGT 500  Human Behavior in Organizations (3).

Prerequisite:  MGT 310.

An experiential course designed to teach management skills such as conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and communication, as well as the functioning of groups.  Case analysis and oral/written presentations required. 

MGT 503  Advanced Topics in International Management (3).

Prerequisite:  Graduate Standing.

Applies international management practices and managerial behavior to decision making.  Topics will include national differences in culture, strategies for communicating, cooperating across cultures, and managing global operations.  Case analysis and oral/written presentations required. 

MGT 590  Strategic Management (3).

Prerequisite:  Must be taken during the last semester in residence.

Strategy, leadership from middle to top management perspective.  Use of cases, readings, simulations to integrate functional fields of business.  Requires team activities, strategy formulation/implementation, serving purpose of comprehensive project.  Case analysis, oral/written presentation and computer usage required.

MGT 594  Independent Study in Management (3).

Prerequisite:  Graduate standing and completion of MGT 500.

Independent study of particular topics in management under the direction of a full-time faculty member of the Business Administration Program.  CR/NC grading. Repeatable course.

MGT 595  Special Topics in Management (3).

Prerequisite:  Graduate standing and completion of MGT 500.

Intensive study of a specialized area in management on a selected topic of  particular interest to faculty and students.  Intended for students with senior or graduate standing.  Specific topic listed in class schedule.  Repeatable course.

MKT 350  Principles of Marketing (3).

Prerequisite: ECO 210 recommended.

Survey of the marketing function, including the marketing environment and target markets; marketing strategy with emphasis on the marketing mix; social and ethical responsibilities of marketing. 

MKT 351  Sales Management and Sales Techniques (3).

Prerequisite: MKT 350.

Organizing, motivating and controlling the activities of the sales force.  Developing the knowledge and skills of professional selling useful for accomplishing career objectives; cases and role playing required. 

MKT 352  Advertising and Promotion Management (3).

Prerequisite: MKT 350.

Management and coordination of advertising, marketing public relations, and sales promotion; case analysis and presentations. 

MKT 355  Consumer Behavior (3). 

Prerequisite: MKT 350 (may be taken concurrently)

Consumer buying patterns, motivation, and search behavior; consumer decision-making process; interdisciplinary concepts from economics, sociology, psychology, cultural anthropology, and mass communications; case analysis and research projects. 

MKT 358  International Marketing  (3).

Prerequisite: MKT 350.

Analysis of international marketing problems including economic, social, cultural, technological, political, geographic and competitive forces; cases and projects. 

MKT 450  Internet Marketing  (3).

Prerequisites: MKT 350

The principal focus of this course will be on understanding the marketing implications on internet marketing.  Students will learn how internet marketing differs from traditional marketing and determine the role of marketing functions in internet programs; cases and projects.

MKT 452  Sports and Entertainment Marketing (3).

Prerequisites: MKT 350

Theory and practice of the strategic marketing processes applied to sports and entertainment enterprises; planning marketing mixes; market selection decisions; distribution strategies; media mergers and acquisitions; cross platform marketing; regulation issues; sponsorships and events; readings and case studies.

MKT 454  Marketing Research (3).

Prerequisites: MKT 350 and QMS 321.

The marketing research process with an emphasis on cost versus value of information for decision-making: problem formulation, research design, sources of research data, measurement techniques and data collection, sampling techniques, data analysis, interpretation, and reporting; term research projects. 

MKT 459  Seminar in Marketing Management (3).

Prerequisites: Prior completion of at least four courses from the Marketing concentration;    MKT 355, MKT 454, FIN 360 and QMS 322 are recommended.

Comprehensive analysis of marketing management problems, functions, and the decision-making process; emphasis on the case method as related to problems of product, price, distribution and promotion.  (3)

MKT 494  Independent Study in Marketing (3).

Prerequisite:  Completion of at least two marketing concentration courses and approval of the Department of Marketing Chair.

Independent study of particular topics in Marketing under the direction of a full-time faculty member of the Marketing Department.  CR/NC grading. Repeatable course.

MKT 495  Special Topics in Marketing (3). 

Prerequisite:  MKT 350.  

Study of a current topic in Marketing.  Repeatable course.

MKT 496  Internship in Marketing (3).

Prerequisite:  Completion of at least two marketing concentration courses and approval of the Department of Marketing Chair.

Under the direction of the Internship Coordinator, students work in a business organization applying skills and knowledge learned in the classroom.  CR/NC grading. Repeatable course.

                                   

MKT 500  Marketing Management (3).

Prerequisite:  MKT 350.

Current topics in strategic marketing:  strategic planning, market resource allocation, buying behavior, forecasting, product positioning.  Social, legal, ethical and global issues in marketing will be explored.  Case analysis oral/written presentations and computer usage required. 

MKT 501  Marketing Information Management (3).

Prerequisite:  MKT 500.

Learn important tools and databases needed by marketers for decision-making.  The course explores the applications of marketing information as a competitive tool.  Also covers marketing research tools and processes.  Case analysis, oral/written presentation and computer usage required.

MKT 503  International Marketing:  Cases and Current Issues (3). 

Prerequisite:  MKT 500.

Current topics in international marketing.  Topics include strategic planning, global environmental variables, marketing research in international markets, export and import process and negotiations. 

MKT 510  Business-to-Business Marketing (3).

Prerequisite:  MKT 501 or concurrent enrollment.

Focuses on the strategies used for marketing products and services to commercial, institutional, and governmental markets.  Case analysis, oral/written presentation and computer usage required.

MKT 512  Seminar in Services Marketing (3).

Prerequisite:  MKT 501 or concurrent enrollment.

Examines the marketing and managerial implications of the differences between goods and services.  Covers many service marketing concepts, including the relationship between the service provider and customer, the real-time pocess experience of services, customer satisfaction and service quality.

MKT 530  Negotiation and Persuasive Presentation (3).

Prerequisite:   MKT 501 or concurrent enrollment.

Introduces students to the best principles used in marketing negotiations.  Students will understand characteristics of a good negotiator; critical elements in negotiations, strategies and tactics used for and against.  Also includes improving communication through personal presentation.

MKT 531  Sales Management (3).

Prerequisite:  MKT 501 or concurrent enrollment.

Discusses the strategic and tactical aspects of sales force management.  Appropriate for students interested in careers in sales management or management positions in companies whose revenues and profits depend on a productive sales force.

MKT 545  Seminar in New Product Development (3).

Prerequisite:  MKT 501 or concurrent enrollment.

Focuses on product/service decisions and development processes.  Covers the role of new products in marketing and corporate management, along with product policy concepts - product life cycle and product positioning.  Case analysis, oral/written presentation and computer usage required.

MKT 550  Internet Marketing (3).

Prerequisite:  MKT 501 or concurrent enrollment.

Focuses on the marketing functions as they pertain to Internet Marketing, including the Internet marketing environment and target markets; marketing strategy with an emphasis on the marketing mix; social and ethical responsibilities.  Case analysis, oral/written presentation and computer usage required.

MKT 580  Strategic Marketing (3).

Prerequisites:  MKT 501 and three marketing electives; one marketing elective may be taken concurrently.

Provides a comprehensive framework for the application of marketing concepts to the development and implementation of marketing strategy.  Emphasizes the development of an effective marketing plan. Competitive computer simulation, case analysis, oral/written presentation and computer usage required.

MKT 594  Independent Study in Marketing (3).

Prerequisite:  Graduate standing and completion of MKT 500.

Independent study of particular topics in Marketing under the direction of a full-time faculty member of the Business Administration Program.  CR/NC grading. Repeatable course.

MKT 595  Special Topics in Marketing (3).

Prerequisite:  Graduate standing and completion of MKT 500.

Intensive study of a specialized area in marketing on a selected topic of particular interest to faculty and students.  Intended for students with a senior or graduate standing.  Specific topic listed in  class schedule.  Repeatable course.

MKT 596  Internship in Marketing (3).

Prerequisite:  Graduate standing and completion of MKT 500.

Under the direction of the Internship Coordinator, students work in a business organization applying skills and knowledge learned in the classroom.  CR/NC grading. Repeatable course.

                                   

QMS 321 Introduction to  Business Statistics (3).

Prerequisite:  one of the following, MAT 105,  MAT 131, MAT 153, MAT 171, MAT 191, or MAT 193.

Theory of statistics and its applications in business decision-making.  Topics include probability theory, probability applications, random sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation. 

QMS 322 Operations Management (3).

Prerequisite: QMS 321.

Analysis of the management function in the production area with emphasis on computer applications and practical problem-solving.  Includes international developments. 

QMS 423 Introduction to Operations Research  (3).

Prerequisite: QMS 321.

Use of deterministic, probabilistic, and computer-based methods in support of management decision-making with  emphasis on computer applications and practical problems. 

QMS 430 Supply Chain Management   (3).

Prerequisites: QMS 322.

Study of all activities associated with the flow and transformation of goods from the raw materials stage (extraction), through to the end user, as well as the associated information flow.

                                   

QMS 502 Advanced Topics in Operations Management (3).

Prerequisite:  QMS 321 or equivalent.

Management of operations process including production and service aspects.  Topics include capacity and location planning, scheduling, facility layout, project and inventory management quality improvement.  Behavioral, multinational ethical issues will be considered.  Case analysis, oral/written presentation and computer usage required.

QMS 595 Selected Topics in Quantitative Methods (3).

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and QMS 502.

Intensive study of a specialized area of quantitative methods on a selected topic of particular interest to faculty and students.  Three hours of seminar per week.  Specific topic listed in class schedule.  Repeatable course.

                                    

SOM 201   Strategies for College and Career Success (3). 

Explores empowering students to control and shape their own education and careers.  Topics include:  setting goals, planning, time management, doing well on exams, taking advantage of  University resources, writing papers, understanding professors, career choice, the employer's perspective, job success. 

CIS 478    Data Processing Applications in Business (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 374.

Study of CASE approach into design and implementation of business data processing applications and systems; team design work; uses of the computer in modeling and analyzing business problems. 

FIN 427    Financing E-Business (3).

Prerequisite:  FIN 360.

An overview of financing options available to E-Business operations.  Emphasis will be placed on analyzing financing alternatives specific to E-Business, and issues in raising financing at all stages of operations.  Course includes reading assignments, case studies, and Internet applications.

LAW 440  Legal Issues in E-Commerce  (3).

Prerequisites: LAW 240

This course covers the legal aspects of doing business on-line.  Topics covered will include:  on-line contracts, e-crimes, privacy, intellectual property, e-commerce taxation and e-payment systems.

                                    

MGT 419  Managing an E-Business (3).

Prerequisite:  MGT 310, senior status, completion of E-Commerce core or consent of instructor.

The managerial implications of conducting E-Business.  Introduces new business  models and strategies used by E-Business and their impacts on organizational culture.  Group exercises, case studies, and team projects required.

MGT 491  Business Consulting Practicum (3).

Prerequisites: Senior Status and completion of all business core courses.  BUS 445, FIN 480, and QMS 423 may be taken concurrently (priority will given to graduating seniors).

Business capstone courses offered in conjunction with Small Business Administration.  Student teams participate in solution of actual business problems; field work required.

MGT 492  E-Commerce Practicum (3).

An integrating practicum course dealing with all aspects of E-Commerce management; cases, lectures, and projects.

MKT 353  Retail Marketing Management (3).

Prerequisite: MKT 350.

Selecting store location, layout, merchandise goods, assortments, and selling to target market, including sales growth through direct marketing, franchising and acquisition; cases and field research required. 

QMS 425 Logistics Management (3).

Prerequisite: QMS 322.

Management of logistic systems including the acquisition, movement and storage of materials and the warehousing and distribution of finished goods. 

QMS 426 Production Planning and Control (3).

Prerequisite: QMS 322.

Techniques and systems for planning, scheduling, and controlling production. 

QMS 427 Quality Management  (3).

Prerequisite: QMS 321.

Basic elements of quality management are presented.  Quality management related to wide areas of business activities are discussed.  This includes not only the quality control of manufactured products but also various kinds of service activities such as quality management of finance, accounting and marketing departments of manufacturing companies as well as hospitals, airlines, trucking companies, governments, schools, accounting firms and law firms. 

QMS 428 Purchasing and Procurement  (3).

Prerequisite: QMS 322.

Examines activities directed to securing the materials, supplies, equipment and services required for the proper and efficient functioning of a business, including related planning and policy issues. 

QMS 429 Service Operations Management (3). 

The course emphasis is on the design and operations of service delivery firms as well as service delivery functions within manufacturing firms.  It includes topics such as strategic planning and design techniques, principles of delivering quality service, managing capacity and demand, managing information, techniques for improving quality of service operations processes and customer services, and the human dimension in service management. 

                                   

CHE 102   Chemistry for the Citizen (3). 

A non-mathematical treatment of the basic principles of chemistry and their application to various facets of life in a highly technological society. 

CHE 108   Introduction to College Chemistry (5). 

Measurements, units, unit conversion, scientific notation, chemical stoichiometry, mole concept, structure of atoms and molecules.  CR/NC grading.  Three hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week.

CHE 110   General Chemistry I (5). 

Prerequisites: CHE 108 or high school chemistry and satisfactory performance on the General Chemistry Placement test. 

Chemical stoichiometry, atomic structure, periodic table, quantum theory, gases, thermochemistry, ionic bonding, Lewis formulas, liquids, solids, solutions.  Four hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

CHE 112   General Chemistry II (5). 

Prerequisite: CHE 110. 

Chemical kinetics, equilibria, thermodynamics, acids and bases, solubility, electrochemistry, covalent bonding, transition metal complexes.  Four hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

CHE 230   Quantitative Analysis (4). 

Prerequisite: CHE 112.

Introduction to the techniques and theory of gravimetric and volumetric analyses, colorimetry, flame photometry and electroanalytical procedures.  Two hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week.  Laboratory fee required.

                                   

CHE 300   Organic Chemistry I (3).

Prerequisite: CHE 112 or 1 year of general chemistry.

A detailed study of organic molecular structure, reaction mechanisms stereochemistry, and synthesis with emphasis on a aliphatic and aromatic systems. 

CHE 301   Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (1).

Prerequisites: CHE 112 or 1 year of general chemistry; concurrent enrollment in CHE 300.

Basic experimental techniques of organic chemistry.  Three hours of laboratory per week.

CHE 302   Organic Chemistry II (3). 

Prerequisites: CHE 300 and CHE 301.  Concurrent enrollment in CHE 303. 

Continuation of CHE 300 with emphasis on the chemistry of organic compounds containing oxygen and nitrogen. 

CHE 303   Organic Laboratory II (1). 

Prerequisites: CHE 112 or 1 year of general chemistry; concurrent enrollment in CHE 302.

Preparation of organic compounds and qualitative organic analysis.  Three hours of laboratory per week.

CHE 310   Organic Chemistry I (4).

Prerequisites: CHE 112; concurrent enrollment in CHE 311. 

Systematic study of organic compounds, with emphasis on molecular structure and reaction mechanisms; stereochemistry; aliphatic compounds. 

CHE 311   Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (1). 

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in CHE 310. 

Techniques of separation and purification of organic compounds.  Introduction to organic synthesis.  Three hours of laboratory per week. Fee required.

CHE 312   Organic Chemistry II (3). 

Prerequisites: CHE 310, CHE 311; concurrent enrollment in CHE 313.

A continuation of CHE 310 with emphasis on aromatic systems.  Introduction to spectroscopy.  Structures and reactions of organic compounds containing oxygen and nitrogen. 

CHE 313   Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (2). 

Prerequisites: CHE 310, CHE 311; concurrent enrollment in CHE 312. 

Organic synthesis, introduction to spectros copy.  Qualitative organic analysis.  Six hours of laboratory per week.  Fee required.

CHE 316   Survey of Organic Chemistry (3). 

Prerequisite: CHE 112 and concurrent enrollment in CHE 317. 

Structure and properties of aliphatic and aromatic compounds.  Stereochemistry and functional group chemistry.  Oriented toward life sciences and related areas. 

CHE 317   Survey of Organic Chemistry Laboratory (1).

Co-requisite: CHE 316. 

Basic purification processes and techniques of separation of mixtures.  Preparation of organic compounds.  Introduction to qualitative and quantitative analytical methods, including chemical, chromatographic, and spectroscopic procedures.  Three hours of laboratory per week.  Fee required.

CHE 320   Physical Chemistry I (5). 

Prerequisites: CHE 112 and CHE 230; MAT 193; PHY 132. 

PHY 122 may be substituted for PHY 132 by students in the biochemistry option and by non-chemistry majors, with consent of instructor.  Principles and applications of classical thermodynamics and chemical kinetics.  Introduction to computer based techniques of treating scientific data. 

CHE 322   Physical Chemistry II (3).

Prerequisite: CHE 320. 

Introduction to group theory, quantum chemistry, spectroscopy and statistical thermodynamics. 

CHE 393   Supervised Laboratory Projects (1-3).

Prerequisites: CHE 112 and consent of instructor. 

Laboratory projects to be carried out under the supervision of a chemistry faculty member.  Designed for students of sophomore and junior standing.  CR/NC grading.  Repeatable course.  Three to nine hours of laboratory per week.

CHE 420   Advanced Applications for Chemistry (2).

Prerequisite:  CHE 320.

Advanced applications for chemistry including computational techniques, molecular modeling, combinatorial approaches to synthesis, data acquisition and analysis, and use of computers to simulate spectral data. One hour of lecture and two hours of activity per week.

CHE 431   Advanced Integrated Laboratory I (3).

Prerequisites: CHE 230 and CHE 320. 

Experimental work involving instrumental analytical techniques, inorganic syntheses, physical measurements on chemical systems.  Analysis of experimental data, including the use of computer techniques.  One hour of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week.

CHE 433   Advanced Integrated Laboratory II (3). 

Prerequisites: CHE 431 and CHE 322. 

A continuation of CHE 431.  One hour of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week.

CHE 440   Inorganic Chemistry (4). 

Prerequisite: CHE 322. 

Structural inorganic chemistry, coordination compounds, mechanisms of inorganic reactions, inorganic synthetic methods.  Organometallic chemistry, catalysis. 

CHE 450   Biochemistry I (4).

Prerequisites: CHE 230, CHE 312 and CHE 313, or CHE 316 and CHE 317, and concurrent enrollment in CHE 451.

The chemistry of amino acids and proteins; the chemistry and metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids; energetics in living systems. 

CHE 451   Biochemistry Laboratory I (1). 

Prerequisites: CHE 230, CHE 312, and CHE 313, or CHE 316 and CHE 317, and concurrent enrollment in CHE 450. 

Biochemistry laboratory experiments using advanced techniques for separation and analysis of biologically active compounds.  Three hours of laboratory per week.  Fee required.

CHE 452   Biochemistry II (4).

Prerequisite: CHE 450. 

Metabolism of nitrogenous compounds, discussion of nucleic acid structure/function and metabolic control. 

CHE 453   Biochemistry Laboratory II (2). 

Prerequisites: CHE 451 and concurrent enrollment in CHE 452. 

Biochemistry experiments using advanced techniques for the isolation and purification of macromolecules, and for determination of their activity or function.  Six hours of laboratory per week.

CHE 456   Clinical Chemistry (3). 

Prerequisites: CHE 450 and CHE 451. 

Methods of analysis of body fluids and tissues.  Relation of analytical results to interpretation of metabolism and diagnosis of disease.  Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.  Laboratory fee required.

CHE 460   Chemical Literature (2). 

Prerequisites: CHE 312 and CHE 320. 

Chemical literature, including the nature, content, and accessibility.  Modern electronic search and retrieval techniques. 
CR/NC grading. 

CHE 495   Selected Topics in Chemistry (1-3). 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

Lectures on a specific area of current interest in chemistry, or advanced discussion of a selected topic in a limited field of chemistry.  Repeatable course.  One to three hours of lecture per week.

CHE 497   Directed Research (1-3). 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and consent of instructor. 

Advanced laboratory work, with each student undertaking an independent and original investigation.  CR/NC grading.  Repeatable course.  Three or nine hours of laboratory per week.

                                   

CHE 458   Toxicology (3).

Prerequisites: CHE 450 is required; CHE 452 is recommended. 

Discussion of methods of introduction
of toxic substances into the body, their metabolic transformations, and their biochemical and physiological effects.  Examples drawn from forensic, clinical, occupational, and environmental sources. 

CHE 474   Geochemistry (3). 

Prerequisites: CHE 112 is required; EAR 356 is recommended. 

Factors controlling the distribution of the chemical elements in the earth, atmosphere and oceans.  Methods in the analysis of minerals.  Special consideration of economically important metals.  Applications in earth sciences, chemistry, and environmental studies.  Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

                                   

CHS 100  The Americas: European Cultural and Historical Synthesis (3). 

An in-depth study of the Mexican Indian and European peoples who created major New World mestizo culture that influences
a significant portion of the Western Hemisphere today.

CHS 110  High-Tech Research Methods (1).

Introduction to modern research techniques utilizing the latest computer technology.  Emphasis will be on use of online resources of the University Library and resources beyond:  union catalogs for the CSU and UC systems; collections online; internet search engines, etc.

CHS 205  Introduction to Chicano Literature (3). 

Prerequisite:  CHS 100 recommended.

An introduction to selected works of modern Chicano literature including an analysis of influences, themes, and techniques.  Special attention given to certain issues of the Chicano experience reflected in the literature. Frequent written assignments. 

CHS 210  Representation of Indigenous People in the Americas (3).

An introduction to the different forms on indigenous representation with special emphasis on Mesoamerica.  Discussions of how these accounts are expressed, perceived, and constructed at the point of European contact will be examined.

CHS 215  Changing Dynamics in Raza Communities (3).

Assesses the challenges confronting the Chicano community resulting from increased and diverse patterns of immigration, restricted occupational opportunities, and socio-political differences.  Focus will be on urban issues from communities throughout the United States, including the Mexican/United States Border.

CHS 225  Introduction to Mexican and Chicano Poetry & Music (3).

An introduction to Mexican/Chicano poetry and music from the Spanish Conquest to the present.  Students will learn to recognize boleros, sones, huapangos, mariachi, norteno, corridos, “Tex-Mex,” and “oldies.”  The class is not designed for music majors.

CHS 295  Special Topics in Chicana/Chicano Studies (3).

A study of an issue, concept, or theme in Chicana/Chicano studies. Repeatable for
a maximum of six units for credit.

                                   

CHS 300  Introduction to Chicana/Chicano Studies (3).

Prerequisite: CHS 100 is recommended.

An introduction to the historical, political, psychological, and social aspects of the Chicano experience.  Includes an analysis of the  various forces and circumstances that make up the second largest minority in the United States.  This course meets the intent of Assembly Bill 1117 of September 4, 1969.

CHS 325  Chicana/o Movement (3).

A historical and comparative examination of the Chicano/a movement by examining the early pattern of Mexican immigration and the formation of mutual aids associations designed to defend their interests.  The focus is on the period from 1960-1990.

CHS 396  Practicum in Chicana/o Studies (3). 

Supervised work experience in a Chicano/Latino community with emphasis upon social and economic development in a local, national, or international setting.  Students will be placed in settings suitable to their academic expertise.  

CHS 400  Chicana/o Issues in Education and Society (3).

An overview of the educational system in society - how it functions, whom it serves, and the cultural and theoretical explanations for the success and failure of Chicano/a students.  Discussions include family values, teen pregnancy, language, gangs, etc.

CHS 410  Chicana/o Popular Culture               (3).

An overview of the central areas of Chicana/o popular culture, focusing on film, mass media, art, theatre, and music.  The course examines how concepts of culture, identity, and ethnicity are popularly expressed in a constant state of flux.

CHS 450  Precolombian Literature of Mexico (3).

Prerequisite:  CHS 300 recommended.

The study of the literature of ancient Mexico, specifically the Popol Vuh of the Maya and Aztec poetry, in order to obtain an insight into the Precolombian world view.  Periodic essay exams. 

CHS 460  La Latina  (3).

Prerequisite:  CHS 100 recommended.

The study of the issues that Indohispanic women encounter in contemporary U.S. society.  This includes a survey of remote and recent cultural, social, and political developments that have influenced the values, expectations, and roles of Indohispanic females.

CHS 470  The Mexican Revolution in Art and Literature  (3).

Prerequisite:  CHS 300 recommended.

The study of the impact of the Mexican Revolution on the art and literature of 20th Century Mexico as well as its influence on contemporary Chicano art.  Topics to be covered are philosophy, muralism, the corrido, folk speech, legends, and the novel of the Mexican Revolution. 

CHS 480  Mexican/Chicano and Central American Culture and Customs (3).

Prerequisite:  CHS 300 recommended. 

The study of aspects of contemporary Mexican/Chicano and Central American folk art, music, and literature, traditions, philosophy, and belief systems leading to a better understanding and appreciation of the customs and culture of these Indohispanic groups. 

CHS 485  Intellectual Traditions in the Americas (3).

Recommended Prerequisite:  CHS 300

The course offers some of the philosophical, intellectual, and social concepts of the Americas.  Themes crucial for the study of Chicano and Latino cultures have been considered to understand the political, social, and economic reality of the Americas.

CHS 486  Chicana/o Family and Gender Issues (3).

The course examines family and gender issues as they relate to the Chicana/o community in the United States.  Topics will include Chicana/o family roles and structure, cultural values, experiences that influence and challenge families, gender roles and expectations.

CHS 490  Seminar in Chicana/Chicano Studies (3).

Prerequisites: Senior standing and consent  of instructor or Program Director.

Study of selected topics which provide a comprehensive understanding of the experience, contributions, and participation of Chicanos in United States society. Three hours of seminar per week.

CHS 494  Independent Study (1-3). 

Prerequisite: Consent of Program Director. 

Independent study of a particular topic in Chicana/Chicano Studies relating two or more disciplines, such as anthropology, art, education, history, language, music, politics, psychology, or sociology under the direction of an instructor in Chicana/Chicano Studies.  Repeatable course. 

CHS 495  Special Topics in Chicana/Chicano Studies (1-3).

Prerequisite: Consent of Program Director.

An intensive study of an issue, concept or theme in Chicana/Chicano Studies.  Three hours of lecture per week.  Repeatable for a maximum of six units for credit.

CHS 496  Internship in Chicana/o Studies (3). 

Under direction of the internship faculty, students will work in a Chicano/Latino community, applying skills and knowledge learned in the classroom as well as the workplace.  Repeatable course.

CHS 497  Research Methods in the Chicano Community             (1-3).

Prerequisite:  CHS 100 is recommended. 

Supervised research experience in the Chicano community, including public and private agencies in education, social welfare, industry and the arts.  Reviews basic techniques in research design with emphasis on measurement and social science techniques.  Repeatable course.

CHS 590  Graduate Seminar in Theory and Methods (3).

Prerequisite:  Consent of Department Chair.

This course is an introduction to theorists and methods under girding Chicana and Chicano Studies as these have been deployed in the writings by Chicana and Chicano authors during the past thirty years. The class will present theories and methods that inform intellectual issues in Chicana/o studies..

CHS 594  Independent Study  (1-4). 

Prerequisites:  Consent of Department Chair.

Independent investigation of a research problem or directed readings in a selected area of Chicano Studies.

CHS 595  Special Topics (3).

An intensive study of a concept, movement, school of thought, or individual within the discipline of Chicano Studies.  Intended for students with senior or graduate standing.  Specific topic listed in Class Schedule.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

                                   

CLS 301   Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Procedures (2).

Prerequisite: BIO 122 required.

Demonstration and practice of specialized techniques used in the clinical setting.  Theory of arterial, capillary and venipuncture including complications.  Processing body fluids.  Review of state/federal laws, biohazards and quality assurance.  Oral and/or written reports/projects. 

CLS 302   Clinical Practice (1).

Prerequisites: BIO 122; CLS 301 or concurrent enrollment required.

Practice in clinical laboratory techniques: phlebotomy; serum, plasma and whole blood preparation for testing; Minimum 90 hours training at a clinical affiliate under University Faculty supervision. Written report(s).

CLS 306   Clinical Immunology and Immunohematology  (4).

Prerequisites: BIO 250; CLS 301 or concurrent enrollment required.

Theory and practice of serologic techniques; nature of antigens, antibodies and the immune response. Genetics of red cell antigens.  Pre-natal, neonatal, and pre transfusion testing. Cause, investigation and prevention of HDNB. Compatibility testing and investigation of transfusion reactions.  Case studies. Written reports.  Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

CLS 307   Clinical Hematology  (3).

Prerequisites: BIO 250; CLS 301 or concurrent enrollment required.

Hematopoiesis.  Enumeration and identification of blood cells. Coagulation and hemostasis.  Theory and application of hematology procedures.  Emphasis on detection of abnormalities. Demonstration of special equipment and techniques.  Case studies and written reports.  Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

CLS 401   Overview:  Virology/Mycology  (1).

Prerequisites:  BIO 324 or concurrent enrollment; CLS 301 is recommended.

Brief introduction to “special pathogens” for students preparing for the clinical virology and mycology rotations in the clinical laboratory.

CLS 430   Clinical Microbiology Laboratory (3,4).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year.

Techniques and practice in medical microbiology including parasitology, mycology, and bacteriology at a clinical affiliate. Oral and/or written reports/projects. 

CLS 431   Clinical Chemistry Laboratory (3,4).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year.

Techniques and practice in chemistry at a clinical affiliate.  Oral and/or written reports/projects. 

CLS 432   Clinical Hematology/Urinalysis Laboratory (4).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year.

Techniques and practice in hematology and urinalysis at a clinical affiliate.  Oral and/or written reports/projects. 

CLS 433   Clinical Immunohematology/Serology Laboratory (3).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year.

Techniques and practice in serology, immunology and blood banking at a clinical affiliate.  Oral and/or written reports/projects. 

CLS 434   Clinical Special Procedures Laboratory (1).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year.

Techniques and practice in special procedures at a clinical affiliate.  Oral and/or written reports/projects.  Repeatable course.

CLS 440   Correlations in Clinical Microbiology  (2).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year.

Theory and correlations of pathophysiology in medical microbiology including mycology, parasitology and bacteriology.

CLS 441   Correlations in Clinical Chemistry (2).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year.

Theory and practical aspects correlating clinical chemistry with pathophysiology.

CLS 442   Correlations in Clinical Hematology/Urinalysis (2).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year.

Theory and practical applications correlating hematology and urinalysis to pathophysiology.

CLS 443   Correlations in Clinical Immunohematology/Serology (2).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year.

Theory and practical applications correlating serology, immunology and blood banking to pathophysiology.

CLS 450   Microscopy: Female Genital Tract (4).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year in cytotechnology. 

Microscopic examination of cytologic and histologic material of benign and malignant disease processes from the female genital tract, including microbiology, hormonal effects and response to therapy.

CLS 451   Microscopy: Respiratory and Gastrointestinal Tracts  (2).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year in cytotechnology.

Microscopic examination of cytologic and histologic material of benign and malignant disease processes from the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts.

CLS 452   Microscopy: Genitourinary System and Body Cavity Fluids (2).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year in cytotechnology. 

Microscopic examination of cytologic and histologic material of benign and malignant disease processes of the genitourinary system and body cavity fluids.

CLS 453   Microscopy: Fine Needle Aspirations (2).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year in cytotechnology.

Microscopic examination of cytologic and histologic material of benign and malignant disease processes in aspirated material.

CLS 454   Microscopy: Systems Overview (4).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year in cytotechnology.

Cytologic examination of gynecologic and non-gynecologic material from all body sites for diagnostic purposes.

CLS 455   Cytologic Preparation  (2).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year in cytotechnology.

Current methods of processing and staining material for cytologic study.  Techniques utilized in obtaining non-gynecologic material for cytologic evaluation.

CLS 460   General Cytology, Cytogenetics, Cytology of the Female Genital Tract (3).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year in cytotechnology.

General cytology, cytogenetics, and electron microscopy.  Basic principles of pathology and cytology as they apply to malignancy. Anatomy, histology, pathology and cytopathology of the female genital tract, including microbiology, hormonal effects and response to therapy.

CLS 461   Cytology of the Respiratory and Gastrointestinal Tracts             (2).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year in cytotechnology.

Normal and abnormal cytology of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts with emphasis on anatomical and histological pathology.

CLS 462   Cytology of the Genitourinary System and Body Cavity Fluids (2).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year in cytotechnology.

Normal and abnormal cytology of the genitourinary system and body cavity fluids with emphasis on anatomical and histological pathology.

CLS 463   Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (1).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year in cytotechnology.

Normal and abnormal aspiration cytology of the major organs with emphasis on anatomical and histological pathologies.

CLS 490   Seminar in Clinical Sciences (1).

Prerequisites: CLS 301 and CLS 306 required; and all lower division Clinical Science Program required.

Presentation and discussion of pertinent topics from clinical science trade journals.  Written and oral presentations.  One hour of seminar per week.

CLS 501   Clinical Sciences: Team Concept (3).

Prerequisite: HSC 201. 

Analysis of the current status and problems in health care delivery including management, staffing and health economics; development of a realistic model.  Role of allied health professionals in health care delivery; scientific medicine vs. holistic health; prevention and health education.  Coordination of the clinical sciences into an effective health care team. To successfully complete this class, students must demonstrate proficiency to the satisfaction of the instructor in oral and written communication skills in the English language.  Oral and/or written reports/projects. 

CLS 502   Management Concepts in the Clinical Sciences (3).

Prerequisite: HSC 201. 

Managerial function, organization, and structure. A pragmatic approach to the strategies and tactics available to the professional manager. Special projects in work sampling, workload recording and time management for health care professionals.  Oral and/or written reports/projects. 

CLS 503   Clinical Diagnosis  (3).

By use of case studies, interpretation of clinical data, correlation of history and physical to diagnosis, treatment and follow-up protocols. Student case study investigation.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.

CLS 504   Data Collection and Processing (3).  

Prerequisite: CSC 111 or equivalent.

Collection, storage and retrieval of data, with emphasis on clinical applications.  Modern information systems and evaluation of such systems from the clinical science management view point.  Oral and/or written reports/projects.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.

CLS 505   Statistical Analysis and Research (3). 

Prerequisite: MAT 131.

Application of statistical analysis in the clinical and health sciences, including normal and binomial distribution, t-tests, chi square tests, analysis of variance, linear regression and correlation.  Student project required.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.

CLS 590   Graduate Seminar (1-2). 

Prerequisites: CLS 501, CLS 502 and CLS 503 or consent of instructor. 

Seminar methods and use of the literature in the clinical sciences.  Faculty and student directed discussions of contemporary clinical science issues. Participants present and interpret recent publications.  Written abstracts.  Repeatable up to 6 units.  One hour of seminar per week.

CLS 594   Independent Study in Clinical Sciences (1-3).

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor and advisor.

Independent and original laboratory or field investigation under supervision of a faculty member.

CLS 595   Special Topics in Clinical Sciences  (1-3)

Prerequisite:  Health Care Practitioner.

Advanced topics of special interest to Clinical Science majors possessing health care credentials.  Topic and content will vary as announced.

CLS 596   Internship in Clinical Sciences (1-6). 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing; CLS 501 and 502 recommended. 

Students will be directed to health care facilities to serve as interns within their chosen specialization.  Teaching opportunities may be available in a variety of settings.  Regular meetings are scheduled with a faculty internship supervisor to assess student progress.  Written report required.  Course designed for graduate students in the Clinical Sciences.  Repeatable course.

CLS 599   Graduate Capstone Activity  (1-3). 

Prerequisites: Graduate Writing Assessment Requirement; advancement to candidacy, and completion of all required core courses.

Department approval of advisor and project.  Students will choose either a thesis, project or comprehensive examination in consultation with their advisor.

CLS 600   Graduate Continuation Course (0).

Graduate students who have completed course work but not their thesis, project, or comprehensive examination, or who have other requirements remaining for completion of their degree, may maintain continuous attendance by enrolling in this course.  Signature of graduate program coordinator required.

                                   

CLS 303   Radiation Science (3).

Prerequisites: MAT 171 and HSC 201.

Overview of radiation science:  history, radiation physics, instrumentation, protection and safety.  Applications to clinical procedures utilizing radionuclides. Problem solving. 

CLS 305   Radiation Biology and Protection (1).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year. 

Modes of radioactive decay, photon radiation, interaction of radiation with matter, biologic effects of radiation, decontamination techniques, government regulations. Problem solving. Report writing.  Oral and/or written reports/projects. 

CLS 410   Nuclear Medicine Laboratory: Imaging Techniques (5,6).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year.

Use of nuclear medicine equipment in a clinical setting to visualize organs, determine function of organs and organ systems.

CLS 411   Nuclear Medicine Laboratory: Radiopharmacy and Radioassay (4).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year.

Preparation of radionuclides for administration in diagnostic testing including radio- chemical purity, quantitative assay and sterility.  Radioassay techniques:  calibration and use of instruments, specimen collection.  Quality assurance.

CLS 412   Nuclear Medicine Laboratory: Instrumentation and In-vivo Techniques  (4).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year.

Performance of procedures utilizing radionuclides for in-vivo studies. Instrument calibration, preventive maintenance. Computer applications.

CLS 413   Nuclear Medicine Laboratory: Special Studies (2).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year.

Practicum in special studies of interest related to nuclear medicine. Project and written report.  Repeatable course.

CLS 420   Correlations in Nuclear Medicine: Imaging Techniques (3).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year.

Principles of stationary and moving imaging with correlations to pathophysiology in human organs and systems. 

CLS 421   Correlations in Nuclear Medicine: Radiopharmacy and Radioassay (2).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year.

Theory of radiopharmaceutical applications: radionuclides, dose calibration. Principles of saturation analysis and competitive protein binding, correlations of biochemistry, pathophysiology, radioassay techniques, principles and applications to individual techniques.  Quality assurance.

CLS 422   Correlations in Nuclear Medicine: Instrumentation and In-vivo Techniques  (2).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year.

Instrumentation including Geiger-Mueller tubes, rectilinear scanners, scintillation spectrometers and gamma cameras.  In-vivo techniques including Schilling test, blood volume, time dependent studies, erythrokinetics, gastrointestinal loss studies.

CLS 423   Correlations in Nuclear Medicine: Special Studies (1).

Prerequisite: Admission to the clinical year.

Special studies including ultrasound, radiotherapy and nuclear magnetic resonance.  Repeatable course.

                                    

COM 100 Mass Media and Society (3).

Survey of mass communications media and their effects on society. Comparative analysis of newspapers, magazines, wire services, radio, television, motion picture, public relations and advertising. Problems and potentials of the mass media as mirrors and molders of society.

COM 101 Introduction to Video Practices (3).

Introduction to the process of small format  1/2" and 3/4" instructional video production. The course emphasizes participation in crew assignment on a variety of video taping projects on campus.  Repeatable course.  One hour of lecture and four hours of activity per week.

COM 130 Film Classics (3).

Viewing and analysis of selected American and foreign films of the sound era which represent milestones in the development of the cinema.  Guest filmmakers and performers from the industry may discuss various screenings with the class.  Repeatable course. 

COM 206 Photojournalism (3).

Instruction in the basic principles of still photography.  Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

COM 250 Writing for the Media (3).

Prerequisites:  Typing 25 wpm.

Instruction and practice in the basics of reporting and writing news for print and electronic media.

                                    

COM 300 Organizational Communications (3).

Organizational theory and the role that communication plays in modern business, industrial and governmental organizations.  Case studies and reviews of the literature in solving communication problems of complex human organizations.

COM 302 Law of the Mass Media (3).

Libel law, right to privacy, contempt of court, copyright, the right to print news of public affairs, the Freedom of Information Act, and other legal topics of concern to the media professional. 

COM 303 Policy and Regulation Issues for Telecommunications (3) .

The study of telecommunications policies, regulations and laws.  Focus on current regulatory schemes at local, state, and federal levels and their impact on technology and society.

COM 305 Overview of Interactive Multimedia (3).

Prerequisites:  Junior standing with consent of instructor.  Working knowledge of the Windows 95/NT operating system.

General overview of current topics and issues in interactive multimedia.  Provides an introduction to interactive multimedia concepts, roles, products and systems.  Explores the planning, prototyping, producing, testing, and distributing of multimedia products.  Three hours of seminar per week.

COM 306 Interactive Multimedia Authoring (3).

Prerequisites:  COM 305

Production techniques resulting in interactive multimedia product, utilizing audience analysis, design concepts, budgeting, and principles of interactivity.  Final student projects will be mastered on CD-ROM, ported to the WWW, or “burned” on other appropriate media.  Six hours of activity per week.

COM 312 Telecommunications Technologies (3).

Basic theory and principles of the operation and utilization of contemporary telecommunications technologies and delivery systems.  Assessment of the implications of current and developing technologies 

COM 342 Advertising Copywriting (3).

Prerequisites:  ENG 111 and COM 250 or equivalent are required; ART 344 or COM 358 are recommended.

Creating and preparing advertisements for print and electronic media.  Students will write copy for product and institutional ads.

COM 344 Advertising Media Analysis (3).

Analysis of the comparative advantages (cost and market impact) of various advertising media as a basis for time and space buying within the context of the creative advertising campaign with an emphasis on campaign planning and implementation. 

COM 346 Reporting and Information Gathering  (3).

Prerequisites:   COM 250 and typing 30 wpm.

Theory and practice of information gathering for print and electronic media writing, including the art of interviewing. Identification, assessing and verifying published, computerized data base and “live” sources. Special emphasis on interview problems such as invalid inference and supposition.  Two hours lecture, two hours activity per week.

COM 352 Feature and Critical Writing  (3).

Prerequisites: COM 250 and typing 30 wpm.

Analysis and practice of preparing feature stories and critical reviews for newspapers, magazines, radio, television and video. Assignments include profiles, how-to pieces and news features. Critical reviews focus on theatre, film, music, fine arts and books.  Two hours lecture, two hours activity per week.

COM 355 Print Media Production Workshop (3).

Prerequisites:   COM 250 and COM 358.

Production of laboratory campus newspaper.  Reporting, writing, editing, layout, computer typesetting, photography and graphics.  Repeatable course.  Two hours of lecture and three hours of production activities per week.

COM 358 Communication Graphics                (3).

Prerequisites: COM 250 and typing 30 wpm.

Learning methods for producing various forms of visual communications including fliers, informational graphics and logos, newsletters, magazines and newspapers in correlation with desktop publishing, page design, typography selection, copy fitting photo sizing and cropping.  Two hours lecture, two hours activity per week.

COM 365 Introduction to Public Relations (3).

Public relations practices and principles as applied to government, education and industry.

COM 366 Public Relations Writing (3).

Prerequisites:  COM 250 and COM 365 and type 30 wpm. 

Public relations writing; message and audience analysis.  Creating effective forms of public relations communications, producing print and video press releases, public service announcements, media fact sheets and alerts, executive letters, press kits and brochures and newsletter copy.  Two hours lecture, two hours activity per week.

COM 379 Telecommunications Media Practices and Technologies  (3). 

Analyses of contemporary programming, production and distribution practices in the context of the historical evolution of telecommunications.  Examines interrelationship between traditional broadcasting structures and such emerging entities as cable, satellite, multimedia and computer systems. 

COM 381 Scriptwriting for Electronic Media (3). 

Prerequisite:  COM 250.

Practice in script writing for TV and film. Development of writing styles suitable for each of these media. Emphasis on formal distinctions between aural and visual media.

COM 383 Studio Video Production  (3).

Prerequisite:  COM 101.

Familiarization with studio equipment and control room procedures; uses and functions of microphones, cameras, setting and lighting as they pertain to studio program production. Students will engage in crew rotation for class practica and individual production assignments. One hour lecture and four hours activity per week.

COM 384 Electronic Media Field Production (3).

Prerequisites: COM 383.

Emphasis is on the use of small format video technologies allowing program producers to explore the use of single camera productions in various formats. The roles of producer, videographer, production assistant and videotape editor will be interchanged.  One hour lecture and four hours activity per week.

COM 385 Electronic Media Programming Production (3).

Prerequisites:   COM 383.

Emphasis is placed on news, information and persuasive programming in both studio and field production environments.  Production focus will be varied covering categories such as news, informational, persuasive, instructional, public affairs and corporate formats and programs as production assignments.

COM 386 Electronic Media Editing (3).

Prerequisites:  COM 101, COM 383, or COM 384.  COM 385 is recommended.

Exploration of the role of editing in the video production and post-production processes of traditional and new media, using both analog and digital formats.  Emphasis on digital non-linear editing techniques.  Six hours of activity per week.

COM 387 Mass Media Aesthetics and Program Content:  The Documentary Film (3).

Prerequisite:  Junior Standing

An investigation through screening and analysis of the use of the documentary format as a persuasive communications tool in disseminating information on issues that have journalistic, sociological, political and psychological dimensions. 

COM 396 Workshop in Video/Electronic Media Production (3).

Prerequisites:  COM 383 and/or COM 384 and COM 385.

Engagement in broadcast video and non-broadcast multimedia productions.  Students write, produce, direct projects, and crew for others.  Successful projects mastered/ported to university’s cable channel/CD-ROM workstation/Web Server.  Repeatable.  Three credits toward major.  Six hours of activity per week.

COM 397 On-Campus Internship  (1).

Prerequisites:  Senior standing and approval of the department is required; completion of a minimum of 27 upper division units in the major is recommended.

Directed work experience in the communications field—in print or electronic journalism, public relations, advertising, or broadcasting. Ideally, such work provides a practical bridge linking the student’s academic studies with the world of work.  CR/NC grading.  A minimum of 10 hours per week of supervised work experience under the direction of a professionally qualified mentor.

COM 400 Communication Theory and Research (3).

Prerequisites:  COM 100 and COM 250.

Provides an overview of mass communications from a theory and research perspective.  Explores how audiences receive and use messages and how the research on these activities affects the way mass communication is generated. 

COM 403 Financial Analysis and Strategies for Telecommunications Resources (3). 

Prerequisite:  COM 303 or equivalent.

Case studies in costing telecommunications.  Developing and responding to RFPs/RFQs.  Needs analysis.  Financial strategies for telecommunications expenditures.  Developing business cases. 

COM 467 Public Relations Workshop (3). 

Prerequisites:  COM 250, COM 365, COM 366, and type 30 wpm. 

Analysis of organizational systems and developing strategies for planning/implementing public relations campaigns and preventing/solving public relations problems.  Emphasis is placed on both individual and team case studies, incorporating both strategic planning and writing techniques previously learned. 

COM 490 Senior Seminar  (3).

Prerequisite:   COM 100 and COM 400; senior standing.

Integrative studies and in-depth analyses of the mass media and their role in society.  Preparation of major thesis paper and the sharing of research findings during seminar discussions.  Three hours of seminar per week.

COM 494 Independent Study (1-3).

Independent study in any relevant subject area under the direction of a member of the Communications Department faculty.  Repeatable course.   

COM 495 Special Topics in Communications (3). 

An intensive study of an issue or concept in communications that is of special interest to both the faculty member and the students, such as press and social issues or sports in the media. Repeatable course.  Three hours of lecture per week.

COM 496 Off-Campus Internships (1-3). 

Prerequisites:  Senior standing and/or approval of the department is required; completion of a minimum of 27 upper division units in the major is recommended.

Directed work experience in the communications field—print or electronic journalism, public relations or advertising, film, broadcasting, or telecommunications.  Ideally, such work provides a practical bridge linking the student’s academic studies with the world of work.  A minimum of 10 hours a week of supervised work experience under the direction of a professionally-qualified mentor.

COM 346 Reporting and Information Gathering  (3).

Prerequisites:   COM 250 and typing 30 wpm.

Theory and practice of information gathering for print and electronic media writing, including the art of interviewing. Identification, assessing and verifying published, computerized data base and “live” sources. Special emphasis on interview problems such as invalid inference and supposition.  Two hours lecture, two hours activity per week.

COM 348 News Editing and Design  (2).

Prerequisites: COM 250 and typing 30 wpm.

Principles, practice in copy editing, including review of grammar, spelling, punctuation, word use, organization, word flow, sentences, information verification, application of appropriate story forms; writing headlines, photo cropping and sizing, computer desktop page design and editorial judgment.  One hour lecture, two hours activity per week.

COM 360 Public Affairs and Editorial Writing  (3).

Prerequisites: COM 250, COM 346, and typing 30 wpm.

Reporting, writing and editorial interpretation of public affairs events and issues, including on-site coverage of local governments, civic affairs, schools, police and courts. Utilization of public documents, enhancement of interviewing techniques, with emphasis on accuracy, clarity and social responsibility.   Two hours lecture and two hours activity per week.

COM 425 Management in the Mass Media (3). 

Prerequisites:  COM 100 and COM 250.

Emphasizes management of the electronic media industries, the most heavily regulated in the field of mass communications.  Covers organizational theory, principles of management, functions/style of the manager, programming, sales, promotion and community relations. 

                                   

CSC 101  Introduction to Computer Education (3). 

A computer literacy course designed to familiarize the learner with a variety of computer tools and computer concepts with emphasis on utilizing packaged programs.  This course provides an introduction to the use of computers, common software programs and peripherals.  Students are instructed in the use of a word processor, drawing programs, spreadsheet, database, presentation tools, internet applications and statistical package in scientific applications.

CSC 111  Introduction to Computers and Basic Programming (3).

Introduction to computer programming with particular emphasis on small systems through programming in the BASIC language. 

CSC 115  Introduction to Programming Concepts (3).

Introduces students to computer programming by teaching techniques of problem solving.  Students will become acquainted with decision constructs, looping structures, and subroutine modules.  Students will learn the vocabulary of object-oriented programming.

CSC 116  Introduction to Computer Hardware and Tools (3).

Introduction to microcomputer hardware and operating systems.  Students will be required to use application software to research, generate and prepare a semester project.

CSC 121  Introduction to Computer Science and Programming I (4).

Prerequisite: CSC 115 or equivalent and MAT 153.

Organization of sequential, digital machine:  CPU, I/O, storage, communications devices.  Function of operating systems:  translators, editors, peripheral control utilities.  The development, description and analysis of elementary algorithms.  Three hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.

CSC 123  Introduction to Computer Science and Programming II (4).

Prerequisites: CSC 121.

Continuation of  CSC 121.   Fundamental programming concepts using arrays, records, pointers, linked list, trees and recursion. Good style, documentation and structure will be emphasized.  Introduction to analysis of algorithms for efficiency and correctness.

CSC 195  Selected Topics in Computer Science (1-4).

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor

Content varies.  Topics in computer science not covered by current course offerings. 

CSC 221  Assembly Language and Introduction to Computer Organization (3).

Prerequisite: CSC 123. 

Programming problems in assembly language.  Writing and using macros.  Features of modern computer hardware and operating systems. 

CSC 251  C Language Programming and UNIX (3).

Prerequisite: CSC 123 or equivalent. 

Introduction to programming in the C language and its use in systems programming in the UNIX operating system. 

CSC 295  Selected Topics in Computer Science (1-4)

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor

Content varies.  Topics in computer science not covered by current course offerings.  May be used for elective credit in departmental programs.  Subject to approval.

                                   

CSC 301  Computers and Society  (3).

Prerequisites:  CSC 121 or CSC 111 or CIS 270 are required; ECO 200 and ANT 100 are recommended. 

Ethical, legal, psychological, economic, and theoretical implications and limitations of the uses of digital computers. Oral and written presentations required.

CSC 311  Data Structures (3).

Prerequisites: CSC 123, MAT 193 and MAT 281.

More advanced and detailed treatment of concepts of data organization introduced in CSC 123. Includes lists, trees, graphs and storage allocation and collection.  Applications to such areas as symbol tables, string search and optimization.

CSC 321  Programming Languages (3).

Prerequisite: CSC 123. 

A comparative study of programming languages. Characteristics of languages and formal description of languages.  Assignments in several languages. 

CSC 331  Computer Organization  (3).

Prerequisites: CSC 221 and MAT 281.  

Structure of the modern digital computer. Introduction to Boolean algebra and design of digital circuits.  Arithmetic, control, storage and input/output systems. 

CSC 341  Operating Systems (3).

Prerequisites: CSC 311, CSC 331, and MAT 321.

Overall structure of batch and time-shared operating systems. Scheduling of jobs, CPU and I/O devices.  Paged and segmented memory management.  I/O programming and file handling. Synchronization of concurrent processes. 

CSC 395  Selected Topics in Computer Science (1-4).

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor and upper division standing in major

Content varies.  Advanced topics in computer science not covered by current course offerings.  May be used for elective credit in departmental programs.  Subject to approval.

CSC 401  Analysis of Algorithms  (3).

Prerequisite: CSC 311.

Mathematical study of non-numeric computer algorithms.  Topics include combinatorial techniques, algorithm proof, and program complexity. 

CSC 411  Artificial Intelligence (3).

Prerequisites: CSC 311 and CSC 321. 

Introduction to the use of computers to simulate intelligent behavior; includes game playing, problem solving, use of natural languages and pattern recognition. 

CSC 431  Advanced Computer Organization (3).

Prerequisites: CSC 221, CSC 331, CSC 341, MAT 271, and MAT 281. 

Alternate computer architectures and features of large scale systems. Microprogramming, parallel processing, memory organization, input/output systems, interprocessor communications and multiprocessing. 

CSC 451  Computer Networks (3).

Prerequisite: CSC 341. 

An introduction to computer networks including both long haul and local area networks. Topics include network topology, network access methodology, transmission media, protocols and applications.  

CSC 453  Data Management (3).

Prerequisite: CSC 311.

Fundamental concepts in design, analysis and implementation of computerized database systems.  Database models, user and program interfaces and database control. 

CSC 455                World Wide Web Design and Management (3). 

Prerequisites:  CSC 251, CSC 311 and CSC 321. 

An introduction to the design, implementation and management of World Wide Web over the Internet and Intranet networks.  Topics include Internet overview, web authoring, web programming, server setting and maintenance. 

CSC 461  Computer Graphics I (3).

Prerequisite: CSC 311. 

Fundamental concepts of programming for computer graphics. Graphics devices, languages and algorithms. Substantial graphics programming projects. 

CSC 471  Compiler Construction (3).

Prerequisites: CSC 221, CSC 311 and MAT 361.

Introduction to the theory and practice of compiler construction. Overall structure of compilers.  Lexical and syntactic analysis, code generation for block structured languages and code optimization. 

CSC 481  Software Engineering (3).

Prerequisites: CSC 311, CSC 321 and CSC 353 are required; CSC 341 and CSC 453 are recommended.

Introduction to software engineering, with emphasis on software design and specification.  Oral and written presentations required.

CSC 490  Senior Seminar (3).

Prerequisite: CSC 311, CSC 321, and CSC 331.

Intense, structured seminar.  Exposure to current areas of research in Computer Science.  Students will attend department colloquia; conduct research; present individual and group projects; and, prepare a written proposal for a senior project.

CSC 492  Senior Design (3).

Prerequisites:  CSC 301 and CSC 490.

Intensive study under the guidance of a member of the Computer Science faculty which continues and expands the research carried out in Senior Seminar.  Students will study system design and total project planning and management.  A formal written report and oral presentation are required.

CSC 495  Selected Topics (3).

Prerequisite: CSC CORE.

Content varies.  Advanced topics in computer science not covered by current course offerings.  May be used for elective credit in departmental programs.  Subject to approval.

CSC 497  Directed Study in Computer Science  (1-3).

Prerequisite: CSC CORE or consent of instructor.

A project in computer science carried out on an independent study basis.  Repeatable course.

 

CSC 337  Microcomputers (3).

Prerequisite: CSC 221, CSC 331, and MAT 281. 

The architecture, programming and interfacing of microcomputers.  Topics include input/output, instruction sets, subroutines, interrupts and control.  In-class use of microcomputer hardware.  Repeatable course.  Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

CSC 353  File Processing (3).

Prerequisite:  CSC 123 and CSC 251 are required; CSC 311 is recommended. 

Characteristics of secondary storage media.  Logical vs. physical organization.  Sequential, direct, and indexed access methods.  Tree structure of indices; hashing. 

CSC 361  Systems Programming (3).

Prerequisite: CSC 311, CSC 331, and CSC 341.

Design and construction of systems programs such as assemblers, macro processors and linking loaders.  Introduction to software engineering. 

CSC 421  Advanced Programming Languages (3).

Prerequisites: CSC CORE.

Continuation of CSC 321.  Methods of formal specification of syntax and semantics of programming languages and special purpose language features for such areas as simulation and systems programming.

CSC 441  Advanced Operating Systems (3). 

Prerequisite: CSC CORE.  

Theoretical study of important topics in operating system design. Substantial individual and group programming projects.

CSC 463  Computer Graphics II (3). 

Prerequisite: CSC 461.

                                   

CJA 340   Criminal Justice and the Community (3).

Political, cultural, and social environment of criminal justice administration; police community relations; accountability of criminal justice agencies to the political and legal order.

CJA 341   Statistics in Criminal Justice Administration (3).

Prerequisites: MAT 105 or equivalent.

Explores statistical procedures used for the analysis of data by criminal justice professionals.  Instruction on the most commonly used applications of statistical analysis in the administration of justice, including review of mathematics and statistical functions and the use of statistics by criminal justice decision makers.  An introduction to computer applications will also be provided.

CJA 342   Legal Foundations of Justice Administration                (3). 

Local, state, and federal judicial systems; constitutional, judicial and legislative influences on the administration of justice.

CJA 423   Administrative Law (3).

Role and nature of administrative law, procedural requirements and judicial review of administrative actions, safeguards against arbitrary action, delegation of legislative power, legal principles and trends in the development of public administration.  

CJA 443   Criminal Law and Justice Administration (3).

Examination of the law of criminal culpability, parties to crime, defenses, and sentencing issues.  Critical analysis of types of crime, elements of specific crimes, theories of criminal law, and issues pertaining to its application by the criminal justice system.

CJA 444   Juvenile Justice Process (3).

Examination of the administration of juvenile justice, including juvenile justice policies and procedures, and components of the juvenile justice system.  Critical analysis of the theory and dynamics of how the juvenile justice system responds to juvenile issues, including delinquent behavior.

CJA 445   Policing and the  Administration of Justice (3).

Examination of policing in the United States.  Critical analysis of theories of policing, police administration, and police obligations and responsibilities under the law.  Analysis of historical and contemporary approaches to police-community relations.

CJA 446   Terrorism and Extremism (3).

Examination of contemporary terrorism and extremism.  Critical analysis of terrorist behavior, typologies of terrorism, and extremism as a foundation for terrorist behavior.  Analysis of the role of law enforcement and other public administrative agencies.

DAN 110  Dance of World Cultures (1).           

Introduction to a variety of ethnic and social dance forms; and appreciation of their historical and cultural origins.  Repeatable for credit.  Two hours of activity per week.

DAN 120  Tap Dance (1).    

Development of proficiency in performing elementary tap technique with emphasis on skills, steps, combinations and terminology.  Appreciation of origin and evolution of tap dance.  Repeatable for credit.  Two hours of activity per week.

DAN 130  Dance Perceptions (3).

Introduction to dance in America through viewing of dance films,  videotapes and live performances. Applications of aesthetic perception and criticism skills to determine artistic value of ballet, modern, jazz and tap dance performances.  Three hours of lecture viewing per week.

DAN 200  Jazz I (2). 

Development of proficiency in performing beginning jazz dance technique.  Emphasis on theory, terminology, steps and combinations in a variety of jazz styles.  Appreciation of origin and evolution of jazz.  Repeatable for credit.  Four hours of activity per week.

DAN 205  Jazz II (2).

Prerequisite:  DAN 200 or consent of instructor. 

Continuing development of proficiency in performing beginning jazz dance technique. Emphasis on theory, terminology, steps and combinations in a variety of jazz styles.  Appreciation of origin and evolution of jazz.  Repeatable for credit.  Four hours of activity per week.

DAN 210  Ballet I (2).

Development of proficiency in performing elementary ballet technique.  Emphasis on basic theory, positions, steps, combinations and French terminology.  Appreciation of ballet as an art form.  Repeatable for credit.  Four hours of activity per week.

DAN 215  Ballet II (2). 

Prerequisite: DAN 210 or consent of instructor. 

Continuing development of proficiency in performing elementary ballet technique.  Emphasis on basic theory, positions, steps, combinations and French terminology. Appreciation of ballet as an art form. 
Repeatable for credit.  Four hours of activity per week.

DAN 220  Modern Dance I (2). 

Development of proficiency in performing beginning modern dance technique.  Emphasis on basic technical development, movement theories, movement phrasing and terminology.  Appreciation of basic movement discoveries of early pioneers in modern dance, and of modern dance as an art form. Repeatable for credit.  Four hours of activity per week.

DAN 225 Modern Dance II (2).

Prerequisite:  DAN 220 or consent of instructor. 

Continuing development of proficiency in performing beginning modern dance technique.  Emphasis on basic technical development, movement theories, movement phrasing and terminology. Appreciation of basic movement discoveries of early pioneers in modern dance, and of modern dance as an art form. Repeatable for credit.  Four hours of activity per week.

                                   

DAN 300  Jazz III (2).

Prerequisite:  DAN 205 or consent of instructor. 

Development of proficiency in performing intermediate jazz dance technique.  Emphasis on theory, terminology, steps and combinations in a variety of jazz styles. Appreciation of the origin and evolution of jazz.  Repeatable for credit.  Four hours of activity per week.

DAN 305  Jazz IV (2).

Prerequisite:  DAN 300 or consent of instructor. 

Continuing development of proficiency in performing intermediate jazz dance technique. Emphasis on theory, terminology, steps and combinations in a variety of jazz styles.  Appreciation of the origin and evolution of jazz.  Repeatable for credit.  Four hours of activity per week.

DAN 310  Ballet III (2).

Prerequisite:  DAN 215 or consent of instructor.

Development of proficiency in performing intermediate ballet technique.  Emphasis on theory, positions, steps, combinations and French terminology.  Appreciation of ballet as an art form.  Repeatable for credit.  Four hours of activity per week.

DAN 315  Ballet IV (2). 

Prerequisite: DAN 310 or consent of instructor. 

Continuing development of proficiency in performing intermediate ballet technique.  Emphasis on theory, positions, steps, combinations and French terminology.  Appreciation of ballet as an art form. Repeatable for credit.  Four hours of activity per week.

DAN 320  Modern Dance III (2).

Prerequisite:  DAN 225 or consent of instructor. 

Development of proficiency in performing intermediate modern dance technique.  Emphasis on intermediate technical development, movement theories, movement phrasing and terminology. Appreciation of intermediate movement discoveries of early pioneers in modern dance, and of modern dance as an art form.  Repeatable for credit.  Four hours of activity per week.

DAN 325  Modern Dance IV (2).

Prerequisite:  DAN 320 or consent of instructor. 

Continuing development of proficiency in performing intermediate modern dance technique.  Emphasis on intermediate technical development, movement theories, movement phrasing and terminology. Appreciation of intermediate movement discoveries of early pioneers in modern dance, and of modern dance as an art form.  Repeatable for credit.  Four hours of activity per week.  

DAN 330  Beginning Choreography I (2).

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in a dance technique class.

Introduction to dance composition, effort shape, and aesthetic perception and criticism.  Lab experiences exploring principles of dance composition, improvising, creating solo and small group short studies, developing performance skills, and applying aesthetic scanning models to dance.  Repeatable for credit.  Four hours of activity per week.

DAN 335  Beginning  Choreography II (2).

Prerequisites:  DAN 330 and concurrent enrollment in a dance technique class.

Progressing from creating introductory studies to creating extended studies.  Lab experiences applying principles of dance composition, improvising, extending introductory studies, creating large-group short studies, and further developing performance and aesthetic scanning skills. Repeatable for credit.  Four hours of activity per week.

DAN 340  Dance Production (1).

Prerequisites:  DAN 330 and DAN 335 or consent of instructor. 

Designed to teach students how to coordinate and produce a dance concert.  Emphasis on technical aspects of dance production such as lighting design, costume design and construction, recording sound, applying dance makeup, staging dances, and concert publicity and promotion. Repeatable for credit.  Three hours of activity per week.

DAN 345  Music for Dance (2).

Prerequisites:  DAN 330 recommended.

Basic music notation of simple and complex rhythmic patterns and a brief survey of the historical periods of music for dance.  One hour of lecture and two hours of activity per week.

DAN 355  History of Dance (3).

Study of the historical and cultural development of dance movement as ritual, social and performing art activity in world cultures from early man and woman to the present time. 

DAN 410  Ballet V (2).

Prerequisite:  DAN 315 or consent of instructor. 

Development of proficiency in performing intermediate-advanced ballet technique.  Emphasis on intermediate-advanced theory, positions, combinations and French terminology. Appreciation of ballet as an art form.  Repeatable for credit.  Four hours of activity per week.

DAN 415  Ballet VI (2).

Prerequisite: DAN 410 or consent of instructor. 

Continuing development of proficiency in performing intermediate- advanced ballet technique.  Emphasis on intermediate-advanced theory, positions, combinations and French terminology. Appreciation of ballet as an art form.  Repeatable for credit.  Four hours of activity per week.

DAN 420  Modern Dance V (2).

Prerequisite:  DAN 325 or consent of instructor. 

Development of proficiency in performing intermediate-advanced modern dance technique.  Emphasis on intermediate-advanced technical development, movement theories, movement phrasing and terminology. Appreciation of movement discoveries of contemporary modern dancers, and of modern dance as an art form. Repeatable for credit.  Four hours of activity per week.

DAN 425  Modern Dance VI (2).  

Prerequisite:  DAN 420 or consent of instructor. 

Continuing development of proficiency in performing intermediate-advanced modern dance technique. Emphasis on intermediate-advanced technical development, movement theories, movement phrasing and terminology.  Appreciation of movement discoveries of contemporary modern dancers, and of modern dance as an art form.  Repeatable for credit.  Four hours of activity per week.

DAN 430  Intermediate Choreography
(2).

Prerequisite:  DAN 335 and concurrent enrollment in a dance technique class.

Progressing from creating dance studies to creating dances. Introduction to process of putting choreography on dancers. Emphasis on refining one’s unique way of moving and composing dances, creating dances that represent a unified whole, and refining performance and criticism skills.  Repeatable for credit.  Fours hours of activity per week.

DAN 440  Dance for Children (3). 

Study of developmentally appropriate creative movement experiences for children.  Examination of teaching methodology designed to develop foundational movement skills, artistic exploration of movement elements, improvisational techniques, imagination and creativity, and how these learning activities can be taught across the curriculum. 

DAN 480  Dance Rehearsal and Performance (2). 

Prerequisites:  DAN 200, DAN 205, DAN 210, DAN 215, DAN 220, DAN 225 are recommended. 

Participation as a performer and/or choreographer in a Dance Program approved, University sponsored production.  Concert participation is by audition only.  Repeatable for credit.  Four hours of activity per week.

DAN 494  Dance:  Independent Study (1-3). 

Advanced study in dance, with each student participating in a special project mutually agreed upon by student and instructor.

DAN 496  Internship in Dance (1-3). 

Prerequisites:  Upper division class standing; PED 448 is recommended. 

Planned internship in alternative dance careers at a cooperating institution, agency, organization or company under professional supervision.  Application of principles and skills acquired in student's chosen professional preparation program.

DAN 495  Special Topics in Dance (1-3).

Intensive study of a dance topic of current interest.  May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6.0 units.

 

DMA 300  Digital Technology, Culture and the Arts (3).

Prerequisite: HUM 200 or consent of instructor.

Survey of the impact of digital technology on culture and the arts including but not limited to the visual arts, music, dance, video, film, literature, and theatre.

DMA 310  Tools and Techniques in Digital Media Production (3).

Introduction and examination of the fundamental software and hardware tools used in the production of media for digital delivery.  Emphasis on creative production techniques and the development of skills required in the digital media industry.

DMA 320  TV Directing I (3).

Co-requisite: Concurrent enrollment in DMA 323. 

Fundamental techniques in producing and directing multi-camera television productions in the studio, and single-camera, film-style programs on location.  Emphasis on producer/director skills for performance-based productions in the studio and on location.  Six hours of activity per week.

DMA 322  TV Directing II (3).

Prerequisite: DMA 320 and concurrent enrollment in DMA 323. 

Advanced techniques in producing and directing multi-camera television productions and single-camera, film-style programs in the studio and on location.  Emphasis on producer/director skills for drama-based productions.  Six hours of activity per week.

DMA 323  TV Crew Production (3). 

Co-requisite: Concurrent enrollment in DMA 320 or DMA 322. 

Participation in a variety of crew assignments on production projects in the studio and on location.  Repeatable for credit.  Six hours of activity per week.

DMA 324  TV Titling and Animation (3). 

Introduction to computer-generated titles and basic, two-dimensional animation for television production.  Students will explore the aesthetics of graphic design elements for the screen and related software programs.  Six hours of activity per week.

DMA 325  EFP Videography (3).

Application of professional-format videotape recording techniques used in location shooting.  Emphasis on using portable lighting systems, reflectors, and location sound recording techniques.  Experience in technical aspects of equipment setup, system trouble shooting, and preventative maintenance.  Six hours of activity per week.

DMA 326  TV Sound Design (3).

Use of synthesizers, samplers, and MIDI for music scoring, sound effects drop-ins, ADR, and foley in television and stage productions.  Six hours of activity per week. 

DMA 327  Independent TV Production (3).

Prerequisite: DMA 322 and DMA 323. 

Aspects of producing television features on an independent-producer basis.  Practice in pre-production coordination, location shooting, directing, and editing techniques in the production of a broadcast-quality feature segment for public airing on the University cable TV channel.  Repeatable for credit.  Six hours of activity per week.

DMA 330  Audio Recording (3).

Prerequisite: PHY 100 and permission from instructor.

Theory and practice of sound recording.  Acoustics, psychacoustics, microphones and microphone techniques, consoles, mixers, signal processing and analog tape machines. 

DMA 331  Audio Recording Lab (1).

Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in DMA 330.

Hands-on experience in studio recording.  Live mix to stereo techniques and fundamentals of studio signal flow path.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of laboratory per week.

DMA 335  Music Synthesis (3).

Techniques, equipment, theory, and history of electronic music.  Psychoacoustics, classical tape studio techniques, and a conceptual approach to sound synthesis using modular synthesizers. 

DMA 336  Music Synthesis Lab (1).

Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in DMA 335.

Hands-on experience in classical tape studio techniques and in programming of synthesizers in a variety of musical styles.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of laboratory per week.

DMA 346  Digital Media Production Workshop (1).

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

Collaborative production activity on various projects in the digital media arts curriculum.  Repeatable for credit for up to three units.  Two hours of activity per week.

DMA 400  Strategies for Digital Media Delivery (3).

Prerequisite:  DMA 310.

Advanced exploration into the methods and mechanics of informational and entertainment design and delivery.  Evaluation of media production strategies including linear and non-linear scripting, conditional branching, and virtual reality via online, optical disc, and hybrid formats.

DMA 430  Advanced Audio Recording (3).

Prerequisite: DMA 330 and consent of instructor.

A continuation of DMA 330.  Analog tape machine calibration, noise reduction, console automation, digital audio, measurement techniques.  Guest lecturers from the professional audio community present information on current audio research and development.  Individual reading and research is required.

DMA 431  Advanced Audio Recording Lab (1).

Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in DMA 430 and consent of instructor.

Practical multi-track session work featuring increased access to studio facilities for individual and group recording projects.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of laboratory per week.

DMA 432  Recording Studio Maintenance (2).

Prerequisites: PHY 331 and concurrent enrollment in DMA 433 is recommended.

Installation, maintenance, trouble shooting, and repair of professional audio equipment in a studio environment.  Repeatable course.

DMA 433  Recording Studio Maintenance Lab (1).

Prerequisites: PHY 331 and previous or concurrent enrollment in DMA 432.

Installation, maintenance, trouble shooting, and repair of professional audio equipment in a studio environment.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of laboratory per week.

DMA 435  Advanced Music Synthesis (3).

Prerequisite: DMA 335 and consent of instructor.

A continuation of DMA 335.  Digital synthesizer concepts and a history of computer music.  Computer control of analog synthesizers, theory and use of MIDI specification, direct software and hardware sound synthesis theory. 

DMA 436  Advanced Music Synthesis Lab (1).

Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in DMA 435 and consent of instructor.

Experience in programming a variety of digital synthesizers from the Synclavier II to the Yamaha DX-7 using various mini and micro-computer systems.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of laboratory per week.

DMA 438  Music Production (3).

Prerequisite: DMA 430 and consent of instructor.

Analysis of recordings and seminars in music production.  Spatial and timbral ear-training techniques for recording engineers and producers.  Also a variety of engineering and production topics presented by guest lecturers. 

DMA 439  Music Production Lab (1).

Prerequisite: Previous or concurrent enrollment in DMA 438 and consent of instructor.

Practice in the production of studio recordings.  Responsibility for music composition and arrangements, rehearsal, performance, studio and musician bookings, artist promotion, engineering assistance and artistic direction and management.  Interdisciplinary projects involving video or theatre are also possible.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of laboratory per week.

DMA 450  Computer Music (3).

Prerequisite: DMA 435 and consent of instructor.

Advanced studies in computer applications in music.  Course concentrates on new technologies.  Topics will vary with new innovations in the field.  Students have access to MIDI studio and computer music workstation for individual projects.  Repeatable course.  A-C/NC grading.

DMA 494  Independent Study (1-3).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

Investigation of a single topic, chosen in consultation with a faculty member, culminating in a paper, presentation, or creative project.  Repeatable for credit for up to three units.

DMA 495  Special Topics in the Digital Media Arts (3).

Study of a single topic or contemporary issue in the entertainment industry of television, film, music, or digital media to be determined by the instructor.  Repeatable for credit. 

DMA 496 Off Campus Internship in the Media (1).

Directed work experience in the television, film, music, or digital media industry under the supervision of a professionally-qualified mentor.  CR/NC grading only.  Repeatable for credit.  Ten hours of work experience per week.

DMA 499 Senior Project in Digital Media (2).

Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of instructor. 

A capstone course culminating in the production of a final, collaborative project in conjunction with students from other program options in Digital Media Arts.  Selected in consultation with and evaluated by a faculty panel.

 

ECO 200  Contemporary Economic Issues and Problems (3).

An examination of contemporary economic institutions, issues, and problems as they affect various groups in our society. Familiarization with basic analytical tools and techniques necessary for studying current issues. 

ECO 210  Economic Theory 1A Microeconomics (3). 

Introductory microeconomic theory; resource allocation, output determination; production theory, income distribution. 

ECO 211  Economic Theory 1B Macroeconomics (3). 

Introductory macroeconomic theory; national income accounting, national income determination, monetary and fiscal policy. 

ECO 230  Statistics for Economics (3).

Prerequisite: MAT 009 or fulfillment of ELM requirement.

Introduction to probability theory, estimation of population proportions, means, variances, hypothesis tests, statistical inference and decision-making using multivariate analysis, basic regression analysis, and Bayesean techniques; computer assisted workshops/studies. 

ECO 310 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3). 

Prerequisite: ECO 210.

Role of prices in product and factor markets, principles of production and costs, business behavior under various types of market structure, general equilibrium and welfare economics.

ECO 311  Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3). 

Prerequisite: ECO 211.

Measurements and analysis of the determinants of national income, employment and the general price level.  Theoretical foundations of contemporary monetary and fiscal policies. 

ECO 315  American Economic History (3).

Development of the American economy, organizational patterns and institutions, from settlement to the present, with emphasis on the interaction of social, political, and economic phenomena.

ECO 322  Money and Banking (3).

Prerequisites:  ECO 210 and ECO 211.

Nature and functions of money and its relation to prices; the monetary system of  the United States; the functions of banks, bank-credit, foreign exchange and monetary control. 

ECO 327  Public Finance (3).

Prerequisites:  ECO 210 and ECO 211.

Economic principles underlying public administration. Concepts of socially efficient resource allocation and provision of public goods.  Emphasis on fiscal functions of federal, state and local governments, the allocation of resources between government and private use. 

ECO 330  Labor Economics (3).

Prerequisite:  ECO 210 or consent of instructor.

Analysis of supply and demand for labor, wage determination, investment in human capital, minimum wage laws and the economics of collective bargaining.  Taught with either general focus or special focus; e.g., women, disadvantaged groups and unions. 

ECO 340  International Trade Theory (3).

Prerequisites:  ECO 210 and ECO 211.

Classical and modern theories of international trade, theory and practice of protection, commercial policies, balance
of payment adjustments and regional trade organizations.

ECO 341  International Finance (3).

Prerequisites:  ECO 210 and ECO 211.

Analysis of international financial transactions, capital movements, international financial organizations, balance of payments, key currencies and exchange rates.  Comparison of alternative international monetary systems.

ECO 345  Economic Development (3).

Prerequisites: ECO 210 and ECO 211.

Theories of economic development. Contemporary economic structure of low income countries.  Causes of limited economic growth.  Policy alternatives. 

ECO 350  Quantitative Economic Analysis (3).

Prerequisites:  ECO 210 and ECO 310.

Construction and application of mathematical models to economic and business decision-making.  Modeling techniques including the Lagrange multiplier technique, optimal control theory, and differential game theory.  Two hours of lecture and
two hours of technical activity.

ECO 351  Introduction to Econometrics (3). 

Prerequisites:  MAT 009 and ECO 230.  

Application of statistical techniques to the problem of testing the validity of behavioral relationships suggested by economic theory.  Topics include regression analysis, time series models, forecasting, and decision making.  Applications performed on the computer.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of technical activity.

ECO 380  The Economics of  Urban Areas (3). 

Economic factors underlying and following from the urbanization of modern societies.  Current problems such as urban decay, air and water pollution, transportation construction, education, racial concentration, and city-state and city-federal relationships.

ECO 494  Independent Study (2-3).

Prerequisites:  ECO 210 and ECO 211, and consent of instructor are recommended.

Individual study of some topic or problem under the supervision of a member of the Economics Department.  Repeatable course.  

ECO 495    Special Topics in Economics (3).

A course focusing on selected topics in economics, such as economics of inflation, health, education, ecology, oil spills, and risk and insurance. Repeatable course. 

ECO 375  Industrial Organization and the American Economy  (3).

Prerequisites:  ECO 210 and ECO 211.

Current issues of industrial organization, concentration, and diversification. Anti-trust policy. 

ECO 384  Economics of Health (3).

Prerequisite:  ECO 210 or consent of instructor.

Deals with topics such as supply and demand for health services, prices and cost of health care, fiscal resources and allocations, health insurance and methods of reimbursement, and influences of Medicaid and Medicare and health care consumption and delivery. 

 

GED  500  Research Methods in Education (3). 

Examination of assumptions and techniques of educational research.  Review of pertinent research studies emphasizing their applicability to educational problems.  Statistical concepts, research methodology and computer applications are included. 

GED  501  Seminar in Learning and Development (3). 

Theory, research and practice related to learning and development. Emphasis on biological and psychological factors in individual differences.  Includes study of affective and cognitive development.  Three hours of seminar per week.

GED  503  Socio-Cultural Issues in Education (3). 

Examines the total process of socialization and the effects of cultural determinants on human development and learning.  Considers the school as an agent of socialization.  Change agent role of school personnel is explored. 

GED  505  Evaluation and Program Monitoring in Education (3).

Prerequisite:  GED 500. 

Designed to prepare students to apply theories and models of evaluation in educational and clinical settings.  Provides experience in designing and developing formative and summative evaluation procedures for all educational programs. 

GED  508  Seminar in Issues ­in Education (3). 

Examines significant multicultural, sociopolitical and global issues in urban education.  Includes analysis of current relevant research and assignment of reading list.  Discussion topics vary from year to year.  May be repeated up to six units.  Three hours of seminar per week.

GED  512  Values and Teaching (3). 

Exploration of philosophical literature as it relates to values in education.  Development of values from early childhood to adolescence.  Exploration of personal values.  Methods and procedures for teaching values in the classroom. 

GED 594   Independent Study (1-3). 

Independent study undertaken under the supervision of a faculty member.  Repeatable course. 

GED 595   Special Topics in                Education               (1-3). 

Topics vary by section and semester.  See class schedule for title and prerequisites.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

GED 599  Thesis (1-6). 

Prerequisite: Consent of Advisor. 

The student will execute an individually planned research effort or a creative project.  Students work under individual supervision with assigned faculty.  May be repeated up to six units.

GED 600   Graduate Continuation Course (0). 

Graduate students who have completed their course work but not their thesis, project, or comprehensive examination, or who have other requirements remaining for the completion their degree, may maintain continuous attendance by enrolling in this course.  Signature of graduate program coordinator required.

 

TBE 518   Current Topics in Educational Technology (3). 

Prerequisite:  TBE 520.

Provides information about topics of current interest in educational technology.  Course content and requirements vary by semester. 

TBE 520   Introduction to Computers in Education  (3).

Presents the uses of computers in educational settings, including: computer assisted instruction, criteria for software and hardware selection, computer-assisted testing, and an introduction to programming.  Laboratory in educational computing provides experience in the following areas:  Word processing, LOGO and BASIC programming, computerized grade books, computer-assisted testing and computer graphics.  

TBE 530   Graphics, Word Processing and Desktop Publishing for Educators (3). 

Prerequisite: TBE 520 or consent of instructor. 

Prepares students to use both paint and object-oriented graphics, word processing and desktop publishing software in preparing educational materials. Prepares the teachers who are students of this course to teach these skills to their pupils in the public schools. 

TBE 540   Programming Applications for Educators (3). 

Prerequisite: TBE 520.

Fundamentals of computer programming logic using LOGO and web page development.  Emphasis is on instructional design and the creation of classroom-related materials. 

TBE 550   Computer-Managed Instruction (3). 

Prerequisite: TBE 520.

This class presents skills for managing computer-based instruction, including IBM, Macintosh and Apple II series hardware and software troubleshooting, computer lab supervision, telecommunications, networking, and in-service training design and presentation. 

TBE 560   Preparing Computer Assisted Instruction  (3). 

Prerequisite:  TBE 540 or consent of instructor.

Prepares students to plan and write drill and practice lessons, tutorials, simulations, tests,  and supporting materials for computer assisted instruction. 

TBE 570   Computer Assisted Instruction Final Project (3). 

Prerequisite:  TBE 560 or consent of instructor.

This capstone activity requires the student to develop, field-test and evaluate the effectiveness of a computer assisted instructional product.

MUL 505  Assessment of Second Language Learners (3).

Prerequisite: Preliminary teaching credential or consent of instructor.

Study of basic concepts, principles and practices associated with the assessment of second language learners’ linguistic proficiency and subject-matter knowledge.  Topics include: standardized test score interpretation, evaluation of state-mandated tests, student placement, test construction and authentic assessment.

MUL 508  Language Acquisition in an Urban Setting (3).

Study of current theory and research in language acquisition including an introduction to linguistic subsystems, developmental stages, and factors impacting first and second language acquisition.  Emphasis will be placed on the relevance of theory and research in an urban setting.

MUL 511  Cultural Diversity in America (3).

Examines contemporary diverse populations in America and their influence on American educational institutions.  The analysis of historical contributions and cultural influences on the macroculture provide insight into our multicultural society.

MUL 520  The Teaching of English to Speakers of Other Languages (3). 

Issues and problems, techniques, procedures, and materials for teaching the dominant language (standard English) to the bilingual and to the bi-dialectal. 

MUL 521  Seminar in Mexican American and Hispanic Education (3). 

Explores the socio-cultural basis for the past, present and future status of Mexican Americans and Hispanics with emphasis on legal and political issues.  Content and methodological innovation as well as judicial and legislative actions will be analyzed in depth.  Issues relating specifically to education will be analyzed in this course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

MUL 522  Teaching Reading and Literacy in Spanish (3). 

Designed to prepare bilingual teachers to use effective methodology to teach literacy and reading to Spanish-speaking bilingual (Spanish-English) children.  It includes examination of youngsters’ readiness skills in Spanish, and the analysis of different methods to teach reading in Spanish. 

MUL 525  Bilingual-Multicultural Teaching Methods (3). 

The study of selected bilingual approaches to, and methods of, teaching social studies, science, mathematics, and language arts. Techniques for developing bilingual and multicultural teaching materials. 

MUL 533  Action Research for Urban Educators (3).

Prerequisite:  GED 500 is recommended.

Development of research skills needed to conduct both quantitative and qualitative “action research” in an urban multicultural setting.  Topics include research question formation, research design identification, data gathering techniques, display and analysis of data, creating an action plan, dissemination of information.

MUL 544  Urban Materials Design and Development (3).

Development of skills necessary to design effective instructional materials for urban learners.  Using principles of the “systems approach” and building upon research, theory, and best practices, students will create materials to meet the needs of ethnically and linguistically diverse learners.

MUL 591  Advanced Multiculutral Studies (3).

Designed for students completing the MA in Education, Multicultural Option. Students will synthesize and interrelate diverse areas of study which comprise the masters degree by conducting bibliographic research, writing critical essays and development training sessions for school, staff and community individuals.

PPS 505    Human Diversity (3).

Prerequisite: GED 500, GED 501 and PPS 525

Examines issues regarding psychosocial reactions to variations in individuals of different life styles toward an understanding and respect for diversity.  A critical look at stereotyping and social issues; the nature of prejudice; necessity for advocacy; implications for counselors.

PPS 508    Multicultural and Legal Issues in Counseling and School Psychology (3).

Prerequisite: GED 500, GED 501 and PPS 525 are required; PPS 510, PPS 512, PPS 515, PPS 520 and PPS 554 are recommended.

This course will provide an examination of ethical, legal and professional issues in counseling and school psychology, as well as implications for minority group and cross-cultural counseling.

PPS 510    Leadership and Development of Educational Systems (3).

Prerequisite:  GED 500, GED 501 and PPS 525. 

Overview of effective leadership in student development and pupil personnel services programs.  Examination of leadership role in planning, organizing, implementing managing and evaluating the systemic and comprehensive counseling and guidance programs that are part of an overall school plan.

PPS 512    Consultation and Collaboration in Multicultural Settings (3).

Prerequisite: GED 500, GED 501 and PPS 525

Prepares counseling students to apply knowledge of theories, models, and processes of consultation, and understand the difference between consultation and collaboration.  Skill development in communication, interpersonal, and problem-solving abilities while working with teachers, administrators, families, and other community professionals.

PPS 515    Counseling Theories (3). 

Major counseling theories examined and the competencies of each developed for use in helping relations.  Emphasis on application in educational and public settings. 

PPS 520    Principles of Educational and Psychological Assessment (3). 

Examines individual and group standardized tests.  Course includes an examination of test theory, test bias, techniques and theories for understanding affective, cognitive, and behavioral characteristics of students.  Three hours of seminar per week.

PPS 525    Group Dynamics for Personal Growth (3). 

Provides a personal growth experience for students based on readings and group participation.  The experiential aspects of the course will provide the basis for an analysis of group dynamics and application of techniques for understanding self and others, as well as developing good interpersonal skills. CR/NC grading.  Non-Repeatable.

PPS 530    Seminar in Techniques of Individual Counseling (3). 

Prerequisite:  PPS 515. 

An advanced course in counseling techniques appropriate for use in educational and community settings.  Students will practice various counseling techniques used to establish a positive relationship with clients and assist them in making desired life changes.  Three hours of seminar per week.

PPS 535    Seminar in Career  and Vocational Guidance (3). 

Prerequisite:  PPS 510. 

Theory and practice of vocational and career guidance.  Includes review of current research, sources of vocational information, and practices appropriate for career counseling, including career information.  Three hours of seminar per week.

PPS 540    Seminar in Techniques of Group Counseling (3). 

Prerequisites:  PPS 515 and PPS 530. 

An advanced course in group counseling techniques appropriate for use in educational and community settings.  Developmental issues as they relate to counseling.  Approaches for remedial and preventive counseling. Three hours of seminar per week.

PPS 545    Counseling Children, Youth and Families (3). 

Prerequisites: GED 500, GED 501 and PPS 525

Advanced techniques appropriate  for counseling children youth and families.  Exploration of developmental and socio-cultural issues.  Prepares counselors for an eclectic approach to assisting children, youth and families in problem-solving.

PPS 550    Violence Prevention and Crisis Intervention (3). 

Prerequisites: GED 500, GED 501 and PPS 525

Intensive training in prevention/intervention strategies for educational and community settings with an emphasis on reducing risks associated with violence and crisis.

PPS 554    School Counseling Practicum (3).

Prerequisites: GED 500, GED 501 and PPS 525

Supervised practice using individual and group counseling interventions for academic, social, emotional, and behavioral problems of children and youth.  Candidates participate as leaders of simulated student study teams.  CR/NC grading.  Three hours of seminar per week.

PPS 556    Functional Analysis and Behavior Change (3).

Prerequisites: PPS 512 and PPS 564

In this advanced course, candidates apply behavioral theory in the analysis of the antecedents, consequences, and functions of serious behavior problems from an ecological perspective.  Procedures for designing, implementing and evaluating the effectiveness of academic and/or behavioral accommodations or intervention programs are an emphasis in this course, as are the creation of positive interventions, and the teaching of replacement behaviors based on  legal mandates.

PPS 557    Child Welfare and Attendance (3).

Prerequisites:  PPS 505, PPS 550, and PPS 554.

Provides knowledge and skill in program leadership and management, collaboration and partnerships, assessment and evaluation of barriers to student learning and monitory Average Daily Attendance, utilizing legal and procedural strategies associated with building maximum levels of school attendance.  CR/NC grading.

PPS 559    Assessment Theory and Techniques for Linguistically and Culturally Different (3). 

Prerequisites: SPE 560, SPE 460 and PPS 520. 

Theories and techniques for assessing pupils with diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds.  Issues related to second language development, bilingual, cognitive language development and socio-linguistic factors affecting language usage.  Three hours of seminar per week.

PPS 562    Practicum in School Psychology I (3).

Prerequisite: PPS 520

Administration, scoring and beginning interpretation of tests of psychological processing and ability/cognition as well as alternative instruments and measurements.  Candidates demonstrate appropriate assessment practices through supervised practice.  Experiences shadowing credentialed school psychologists and providing service learning within the public school setting is required for 150 hours or more.

PPS 564    Seminar in Multicultural Educational Assessment and Evaluation (3).

Prerequisite: PPS 520 and PPS 562

Interpretation of ecological evaluations for pupils from diverse backgrounds with an emphasis on cross validation of results.  Observations, review of records, interviews, and assessment results are considered when complete psycho-educational evaluations are written and orally presented with recommendations, goals and objectives.

PPS 566    Practicum in School Psychology II (3).

Prerequisite: PPS 520, PPS 530, PPS 562 and PPS 564

Preschool Assessment and experience with additional standardized and alternative methods appropriate for school aged children.  Presentation of cases for simulated IEP meetings.  Advanced experiences shadowing school psychologists and service learning within the public schools brings practica total to 450 hours.

PPS 571    Multicultural Case Study Methods in School Psychology (3).

Prerequisites: PPS 520, PPS 562 and PPS 564

Issues related to second language development and the assessment of English Language Learners are applied in case studies.  Appropriate selection of ecological evaluations, recommendations, and standards based goals continue for a variety of eligibility categories.  Simulated IEP meetings require oral presentation.

PPS 572    Assessment and Intervention for Autism, Emotional, and Behavior Disorders (3).

Prerequisites: PPS 512 and PPS 564

Differential diagnosis of Autism, emotional disturbance and behavioral disorders.  Administration and interpretation of assessments appropriate for these disabilities.  Specialized interventions such as discrete trial, social stories, TEACCH, and floor time are an emphasis.  Classroom observations for specialized classroom management approaches and motivational systems.

PPS 575    Fieldwork in Counseling (3).  

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

Field experience directly related to functions and responsibilities of certificated school counselors.  Experience in two different settings, including a cross-cultural experience, is required.  CR/NC grading.  Repeatable course. 

PPS 576    Advanced Research Methods for School Psychologists (3).

Prerequisite: GED 500

Review and critique of educational research and the major approaches to educational research for the School Psychologist.  Proposals for action research projects and program evaluations are created which may be later implemented during thesis projects and or credential internship or fieldwork.

PPS 577    Internship in School Counseling I (3).

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor

For students with arrangements with the public schools for emergency credential.  A beginning experience in the field as a certified school counselor in multicultural settings at the elementary or secondary level.

PPS 578    Internship in School Counseling II (3).

Prerequisite: PPS 577

An advanced experience in the field as a certified school counselor.  Arrangements completed with public schools for emergency credentials.

PPS 585    Fieldwork for School Psychologists (3).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

Supervised training in elementary and secondary school settings.  Students must complete a minimum of 90 days of fieldwork and meet competency requirements in psycho-educational assessment, planning and evaluation, counseling, consultation, and behavior management. Course is repeatable for credit until all competencies are completed.  CR/NC grading.  Repeatable course. 

 

CUR 510   Process of Curriculum Development (3). 

Designed to review contemporary developments in curriculum theory and practice.  Course will include experience in development of units of instruction, and the development of criteria for evaluating published curriculum materials. 

CUR 513   Literature for Children and Adolescents  (3). 

Principles of instructional and curricular theory as they apply to the teaching of literature in preschool and grades K-12.  Analysis of literary devices and sequential development of ability to analyze and appreciate good literature.  Emphasizes development of critical and analytic skills in diverse school environments.

CUR 515   Seminar in Curriculum Development in Reading and the Language Arts (3). 

Prerequisite:  TED 403 or TED 406

Review of current developments in curriculum theory and practice for Reading and the Language Arts.  Includes development of instructional units and use of evaluation criteria for published materials.  Three hours of seminar per week.

CUR 516   Seminar in Curriculum Development in Science and Math (3). 

Review of current developments in curriculum theory and practices for science and math.  Includes development of instructional units and use of evaluation criteria for published materials.  Three hours of seminar per week.

CUR 517   Seminar in Curriculum Development in the Humanities and Social Sciences (3). 

Review of current development in curriculum theory and practice for the humanities and social sciences.  Includes development of instructional units and use of evaluation criteria for published materials.  Three hours of seminar per week.

CUR 519   Advanced Study in Curriculum Research and Instructional Practices (3).

Prerequisite:  CUR 510.

Intensive study and evaluation of research in selected curriculum areas.  Emphasizing designing and implementing innovative curricular and related instructional improvements. Requires student to demonstrate effective instructional leadership and problem solving skills in multiethnic school environments. May be repeated up to six units. 

CUR 555   Seminar:  Introduction to National Board Preparation  (3).

This course specifically targets candidates applying for certification by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards.  These standards will be utilized throughout the course in establishing what accomplished teachers should know and be able to do.  Students will develop clear and convincing evidence that Standards are being employed in their own practice.

CUR 556   Seminar:  Advanced Preparation for National Board Certification (3).

Prerequisite:  CUR 555 with grade of A or B.

This course specifically provides ongoing, advanced preparation for candidates applying for certification by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards.  Students complete portfolio entries based on rigorous standards published by the Board, including videos, action research and documentation of effective and reflective practice.  Students should be preparing to take National Board exam during semester in which they take CUR 556. 

 

EAD 504   Historical Foundations of Administration and Leadership Theory (3). 

The role and function of administrative theory in the operation of American public schools.  The study of the development and implementation of major educational efforts; philosophical bases of differing administrative principles and policies, historical context of contemporary management problems/issues. 

EAD 506   Law and Ethics in Public Education (3). 

Examines statutory regulations relating to pupils and school personnel, including legal and ethical provisions for school personnel.  Use of community resources of a legal and/or social nature for handling problems pertinent to public education. 

EAD 514   Administrative Personnel Management:  Practices and Procedures  (3). 

A overview of public school personnel administration with a specific focus on personnel practices including state, local and federal policies and regulations governing certification and classified personnel; state laws governing credentialing, retirement, and collective bargaining. 

EAD 550   Pre-Assessment, Induction (2).

Students will develop an induction plan designed to meet the individual's needs as an instructional leader.  The induction plan will include the assessment of the individual's professional needs to become and urban school leader.  Students will analyze the CCTC Program Standards and the ISLLC national standards and plan and create their professional development plan.

EAD 551   Visionary Leadership (3).

Recommended prerequisite: EAD 550 or concurrent enrollment.

Students facilitate the development, articulation, implementation and stewardship of a vision of teaching and learning that is shared and supported by the school community.  Coursework and fieldwork focus on the vision audit through collecting data, constructing profiles, and aligning resources.

EAD 552   Leadership of Teaching and Learning (3).

Recommended prerequisites:   EAD 550 and EAD 551 or concurrent enrollment.

Students learn how to advocate, nurture and sustain a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning and staff professional growth.  Coursework and fieldwork focus on the implementation of state adopted academic content standards, frameworks as well as assessment and accountability systems.

EAD 553   Organizational Leadership and Resource Management (3).

Recommended prerequisites:   EAD 550, EAD 551 and EAD 552 or concurrent enrollment.

Students learn how to ensure the management of the organization, operations and resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment.  Coursework and fieldwork focus on the study and application of organizational theory that reflects effective leadership.

EAD 554   Collaborative Leadership (3).

Recommended prerequisites: EAD 550, EAD 551, EAD 552, and EAD 553.

Students will learn to work effectively with families, caregivers and community members; recognize the goals and aspirations of diverse families; respond to diverse community interests and needs.  Through coursework and fieldwork, student will examine and evaluate their attitudes toward people of different races, cultures, and ethnic backgrounds.  Students will focus on improving student achievement regardless of race, culture, or socio-economic status.

EAD 555   Ethical Leadership (3).

Prerequisites:  EAD 550, EAD 551, EAD 552 and EAD 553.

Students will examine, practice and model a personal code of ethics, including protecting the rights and confidentiality of students, staff, and families.  Students will practice professional leadership capacity, including shared decision-making, problem-solving and conflict management and foster those skills in others.  Through coursework and fieldwork, students will have multiple opportunities to model personal and professional ethics, integrity, justice and fairness.

EAD 556   Political, Social, Economic, Legal and Cultural Leadership (3).

Prerequisites:  EAD 550, EAD 551, EAD 552 and EAD 553.

The student will learn about political, societal, economic, legal and cultural influences on schools.  Through these interconnections, the student develops the ability to understand, respond to, and influence the larger political, social, economic, legal and cultural context of schools and leadership.  The student will learn how to view himself or herself as a leader and as a member of a team by engaging in course work and field work that provide opportunities to both lead and work collaboratively.

EAD 557   Post-Assessment, Preliminary Leadership (2).

Prerequisites:  EAD 554, EAD 555, and EAD 556 or concurrent enrollment.

Students provide evidence of their competency in all CCTC Program Standards and all six of the CPSELs.  The course-ending formative assessment and program-ending summative assessments of their field-based project and portfolio will become part of the students' school leadership electronic portfolios.  CR/NC grading.

EAD 560   Fieldwork A, Preliminary Leadership (2).

Recommended co-requisites:  EAD 550, EAD 551, EAD 552, and EAD 553.

Supervised field experiences at the school level to include actual job performance in both supervision and administrative work.  Students will demonstrate competencies specified in approved programs.  CR/NC grading.

EAD 561   Fieldwork B, Preliminary Leadership (2).

Recommended co-requisites:  EAD 554, EAD 555, EAD 556 and EAD 557.

Supervised field experiences at the school level to include actual job performance in both supervision and administrative work.  Students will demonstrate competencies specified in approved programs.  Second semester of two part course. CR/NC grading.

EAD 570   Supervision of Instruction (3). 

Prerequisites:  GED 501 and CUR 510 are recommended. 

Historical development and trends of super vision in an educational setting.  Current practices and leadership behaviors necessary for the improvement of instruction, staff development, and the evaluation of teaching-learning effectiveness.  Students will demonstrate competencies in the approved credential program.

EAD 571   School Management and Finance (3). 

Prerequisite: EAD 574 is recommended. 

The course will focus on decision-making, planning, goal setting, use of research in management, utilization of resources, school finance concepts, funding and budgeting, office and plant management, use of computers in management, and administration of specially funded programs. Students will demonstrate competencies in approved credential program. 

EAD 572   Administrative Leadership:  Pre-Assessment of Professional Competence (3).  

Induction plan is designed to meet individual beginning administrator needs:  assessment of individual professional development needs, interests, job responsibilities, and career goals are documented; creation of individual performance goals/plan of specific strategies for achieving these goals; under direction of university mentor.

EAD 573   Administrative Leadership:  Post-Assessment of Professional Competence (3).  

Candidate meets the expectations specified in EAD 572.  Candidate competence falls into five themes required by CTC:  organizational/cultural environments, dynamics of strategic issues management, ethical/reflective, leadership, analysis/development of public policy, management of information systems, human/fiscal resources.

EAD 574   Governance and Politics of Education (3). 

Prerequisite:  ENG 352 is recommended. 

Study of the organization and administration of public school systems and the influences of governmental, political, and social forces in the control and development of educational policy making.  Special emphasis on the uniqueness of California.  Students will demonstrate competencies in approved credential programs. 

EAD 575   Organizational Theory and Behavior (3). 

Human behavior in an organizational context will be studied by exploring group process skills, group management skills, human relations and group dynamics, cooperative planning practices and considerations in designing staff training programs.  In addition, advanced theory and applications in achieving compromise and consensus, and informing coalitions will be presented.

EAD 576   Instructional Leadership (3). 

Learning and instructional research theory together with strategies that meet diverse pupil needs will be presented.  This focus includes the exploration of cultural values, language diversity, bilingual instruction, multicultural and societal needs for improvement of curriculum.  Emphasis on the assessment of teaching effectiveness and staff performance, educational trends and issues, and the use of support services to improve instruction will be included.

EAD 577   Management and Human Material Resources               (3). 

Legal implications of contracts, site and district level funding and budgeting, contract management, the organization and function of school districts, and political forces on educational practice will be presented.  In addition, emphasis will be placed on personnel policies, staff utilization patterns, and short and long-term planning procedures.

EAD 578   Evaluation and Technology (3).

Competency in computer applications for administration, technology applied to instructional practices, and attendance accounting will be the goals of this course.  Students will study conditions affecting evaluation of pupil learning outcomes to instructional goals.

EAD 580   Professional School Leadership:  Pre-Assessment, Induction (2).

The candidate, the university faculty member, and the site mentor together develop a professional credential induction plan for the support and professional development for the candidate based on the six themes of the 2004 CCTC Professional Standards.

EAD 581   Principles of Professional Administrative Practice:  Six Themes (3).

Co-requisite:   EAD 580.

This course has a strong conceptual base and is organized to address principles of administrative practice per CCTC's six thematic areas.  Specialization and individualization occur by determining specialized strands and individualized learning opportunities as specified in the candidate's induction plan.  CR/NC grading.

EAD 582   Professional School Leadership:  Post-Assessment (2).

Prerequisite:  EAD 580 and EAD 581.

The expectations developed in candidate's induction plan aligned are assessed to determine if the CCTC professional standards are satisfied.  Candidate expectations will be different for each candidate, depending on past experiences, current job assignments, and future development goals and plans.

EAD 589  The Contemporary  American Principalship (3). 

The school administrator as a personnel leader in the school organization; techniques of administrative control; strategies in leadership; major topics such as collective bargaining grievance procedures, mediation, fact-finding, and the role of the administrator in these educational events. 

EAD 593   Internship in School Administration and Supervision (3). 

Prerequisites: ENG 352 is required; EAD 570 and EAD 571 are recommended. 

Supervised field experiences at the school level to include actual job  performance in both supervision and administrative work. Students will demonstrate competencies specified in approved programs. CR/NC grading. Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

EAD 596  The Professional and Ethical Imperatives of Administrative Leadership and Practice (3). 

Prerequisite:  Administrative or supervisory position. 

The nature and conduct of ethical administrative practice, planning and policymaking; fundamental approaches to ethics in administration and the work of chief school executives/officials; investigation of major ethical issues in administrative practice and analyses of ethical policies. 

 

GED 592   Education Course Work Synthesis (3). 

Designed to assist the graduate student completing the M.A. in education to integrate previous course work and to research new material in preparation for the master’s exam.  For all options.  May not be used as credit toward the M.A. CR/NC grading.  Three hours of seminar per week.

 

TED 400   Seminar:  Introduction to Education (2).

Introduction to the teacher education program and profession.  Requires 30 hours of observation/participation in urban public schools.  Topics include Teacher Performance Assessment System, lesson planning, classroom management, and the professional legal and ethical responsibilities of teachers.

TED 402 Educational Psychology (3).

Prerequisite:  Admission to Teacher Education

Psychology of learning and motivation related to instruction; emphasis on application of learning principles to classroom learning situations, including multicultural settings.  Survey of applicable research from educational psychology and psychology.  Mainstreaming students with special needs.

TED 403 Elementary Reading/Language Arts I: K-3 (3).

Prerequisite:  Must pass FAST #1

A balanced approach to teaching reading/language arts grades K through 3.  Focus on the foundational skills and strategies needed in the developmental phase of learning to read.  Addresses research-based knowledge and instructional practices aligned with the California Reading/Language Arts Framework.

TED 404   Elementary Reading/Language Arts II (Grades 4-8) (3).

Prerequisite:  TED 403

A balanced, integrative and interactive perspective to teaching reading/language arts grades 4 through 8.  Focus on skills and strategies needed in “reading and learning for life.”  Addresses research-based knowledge and instructional practices aligned with the California Reading/Language Arts Framework.

TED  405 Mainstreaming Children With Special Needs (3). 

A course to facilitate the integration of handicapped children into the regular classroom.  Covers legal responsibilities, diagnostic/prescriptive teaching, problem solving and visits to special education facilities. 

TED 406   Content Related Reading/Writing in Secondary Schools  (3).

Prerequisite:  Acceptance to single subject program.

Procedures, materials for teaching content related reading/writing.  Includes use of multicultural literature, instructional technology, interpretation of research in reading comprehension; reading/writing for language diverse populations, classroom based diagnostic tools, cross curricular reading/writing strategies.  Microteaching or field experience.

TED 407   Language Learning (3).

Focus on linguistic, social, and cultural factors in schooling language minority students; how factors considered for effective learning practices.  Areas of concentration include primary language development, second language acquisition, evaluation, current research.

TED 408   Elementary Art and Music Methods  (2).

Prerequisite:  Acceptance or intern status in multiple subject program.

Multicultural methods, materials and strategies for elementary art and music including instructional planning, lesson design and use of appropriate media materials and resources that are culturally and linguistically diverse.

TED 410   Elementary Math Methods (2).

Methods and materials for elementary math education.  Includes instructional planning, unit development, selection and preparation of curriculum materials, assessment procedures, problem-solving strategies and sheltered mathematics instruction.

TED 411   Classroom Management Methods  (2).

Aimed at the student teacher/intern, this course focuses on culturally and linguistically sensitive discipline strategies, management and effective teaching of techniques identified by recent research.  A minimum of 15 hours field application required.  Intensive format.

TED 412   Elementary Social Studies/ Content Related Reading and Writing  (2).

Prerequisite:  Acceptance to multiple subject program.

Methods and materials for elementary social studies, reading and writing content areas, including instructional planning, unit development, selection and preparation of appropriate curriculum materials, use of media and assessment strategies. 

TED 415   Multicultural Education (3).

Prerequisite:  Admission to Teacher Credential

Analysis and application of the concept of cultural diversity.  Prepares teachers and prospective teachers for multicultural classroom environments and utilization of appropriate materials and methods for culturally, ethnically and language diverse student populations.

TED 416   Elementary Science Methods  (2).

Prerequisite:  Acceptance or intern status in multiple subject program.

Methods and materials for elementary science education.  Includes instructional planning, unit development, selection and preparation of curriculum materials, assessment procedures, and sheltered science instruction.

TED 417   Seminar in Adult Education (1). 

Prerequisites:  Concurrent enrollment in TED 423 is required;  TED 418, TED 419 and TED 421. 

Addresses beginning adult education intern needs for working in ethnically, culturally and language diverse adult school settings.  It emphasizes problem solving and discussion of competency checklists used in intern fieldwork.  One hour of seminar per week.

TED  418 Methods and Materials of Adult Education, Part I (2). 

Course covers instructional techniques; evaluation of student achievement and the learning process in adult education. 

TED 419   Methods and Materials of Adult Education, Part II (2).

Prerequisite:  TED 418. 

Covers instructional techniques, instructional technology, strategies to address the needs of diverse learners and resources in the Adult Education community.  Emphasis will be placed on three specific groups:  ESL students, older adults and exceptional adults.

TED 420   Computer Literacy for Teachers (1).

Prerequisite to Phase I Admission.  Equivalent to Level 1 CCTC technology competency.  Focuses on computer basics, terminology, operation and care of computer-related hardware, trouble-shooting techniques, legal and ethical issues, copyright issues, and interacting with others using email and threaded discussion. Credit/no credit grading.

TED  421 Principles of Adult  Education (2).

Course is designed to meet the requirements for the Designated Subject Credential. Topics include scope and function of adult education, knowledge of cultural differences in students and communities, curriculum, media and community relationships. 

TED  423 Supervised Field Experience in Adult Education (2). 

Prerequisites:  TED 421 and TED 422 are recommended. 

Course is designed to give student practical experiences in teaching adults.  Includes participation in classroom, school and communities, and individualized assignments to fulfill the particular needs of each credential applicant.  Evaluation of field experience in scheduled seminars.  Credit/no credit grading. 

TED 424   Counseling and Guidance for Teachers of Adult Education (2) .

Topics will cover counseling techniques to meet special needs of adult students and interpersonal relations/communication skills. 

TED  425  Workshop in Teaching Methods (1-3). 

Study of various approaches, methods, and materials related to a selected area of the curriculum.  Development of applications at elementary and/or secondary level.  Two to six hours of activity per week.

TED 434   Student Teaching:  Elementary I (3).

Prerequisite:  TED 400 and TED 411

Initial student teaching with a master teacher at an urban multilingual/multicultural public elementary school.  Done in conjunction with methods coursework.  Focuses on Teacher Performance Expectations 1 though 13. Credit/no credit grading.

TED  436  Seminar:  Elementary Student Teachers (1).

Problem solving and use of competency checklists in student teaching at the elementary level. Credit/no credit grading.  One hour of seminar per week.

TED 437   Student Teaching:  Elementary II (9).

Prerequisite:  TED 435.

Consists of one semester of supervised classroom practice with a master teacher at an urban multilingual/multicultural public elementary school.  Done in conjunction with methods coursework.  Focuses on Teacher Performance Expectations 1 through 13. Credit/no credit grading.

TED 445   Fieldwork:  Elementary Interns (6).

Prerequisite:  Must pass FAST #1

Consists of two semesters of supervised classroom practice.  Credit/no credit grading.

TED 447   Intern Performance Assessment:  Multiple Subject (4).

Prerequisite: TED 404.

Assessment Seminar.  Critical reflection on intern performance and student achievement correlated with the 13 Teacher Performance Expectations.

TED 454   Student Teaching:  Secondary I (3).

Prerequisite:  TED 400 and  TED 411

Initial student teaching with a master teacher at an urban multilingual/multicultural public secondary school.  Done in conjunction with methods coursework.  Focuses on Teacher Performance Expectations 1 through 13.  Credit/no credit grading.

TED  456 Seminar:  Secondary Student Teachers (1).

Problem solving and discussion of competency check lists used in student teaching in multilingual, multiethnic, and multicultural secondary settings.  CR/NC grading.

TED 457   Student Teaching:  Secondary II (9).

Prerequisite:  TED 454

Consists of one semester of supervised classroom practice with a master teacher at an urban multilingual/multicultural public elementary school.  Done in conjunction with methods coursework.  Focuses on Teacher Performance Expectations  1 through 13. Credit/no credit grading.

TED 460   Creating a Supportive Healthy Environment for Secondary Student Learning  (1).

Single subject credential candidates learn how to create a supportive healthy environment for secondary student learning.

TED 465      Fieldwork:  Secondary Interns (6).

Consists of two semesters of supervised classroom practice.  Credit/no credit grading.

TED 467   Secondary Teaching Methods I: (ENG/ESL, For Lang., Sci, Soc  Sci, or Math) (3).

Prerequisite:  Must pass FAST #1

Principles of effective instruction, critical thinking/questioning skills, lesson design, cooperative learning, sheltered instruction, guided discovery; curriculum materials for culturally, ethnically, and language diverse content classrooms.  Single subject specific content.

TED  468  Secondary Teaching Methods II  (3).

Prerequisite:  Preliminary acceptance or intern status in single subject program; TED 467 or concurrent enrollment; TED 406 recommended.

Taken in single subject credential area.  Explores methods and materials for planning instructional units and lessons.  Presents alternative strategies of instruction and evaluation to assure high-level learning with ethnically, culturally, and language diverse students.

 

TED 470   Critical Perspectives in Urban Education (2).

Prerequisite:  TED 444

Capstone experience.  Focuses on the professional obligations of teachers in society and the role of families and the community in the education of children.  Addresses the historical, philosophical, cultural, and sociological foundations of American education from an equity perspective.

TED 471   Secondary Methods III:  Curriculum and Assessment (3).

Prerequisite:  TED 467; concurrent enrollment in TED 468 is recommended.

Focus on interdisciplinary curriculum and assessment.  Includes diagnostic, formative, and summative assessment.  Focuses on evaluation, grading procedures, and use and interpretation of standardized exams as tools for instruction and monitoring of achievement.

TED 472   Intern Performance Assessment:  Single Subject (4).

Prerequisite:  TED 467; concurrent enrollment in TED 468 is recommended.

Assessment Seminar.  Critical reflection on intern performance and student achievement correlated with the 13 Teacher Performance Expectations.

TED 473   Assessment Seminar: Pre-Requisite Multiple Subject (1).

Assessment Seminar to complete reflective essay required for credential program pre-requisite phase for all candidates in the Multiple Subject Program.  Credit/no credit grading.

TED 474   Assessment Seminar:  Phase One Multiple Subject (1).

Prerequisite:  TED 473.

Assessment Seminar to complete reflective essay required for credential program Phase One for all candidates in the Multiple Subject Program.

TED 475   Assessment Seminar: Phase Two Multiple Subject Interns (1).

Prerequisite: TED 474.

Assessment Seminar to complete reflective essay required for credential program Phase Two for University Interns in the Multiple Subject Program.  Credit/no credit grading.

TED 476   Summative Assessment Seminar: Phase Two Multiple Subject Student Teachers (2).

Prerequisite: TED 475.

Summative Assessment Seminar to complete reflective essay and performance task required for credential program Phase Two for Student Teachers in Multiple Subject Program. Credit/no credit grading.

TED 478   Assessment Seminar:  Pre-Requisite Single Subject (1).

Assessment Seminar to complete reflective essay required for credential program pre-requisite phase for all candidates in the Single Subject Program. Credit/no credit grading.

TED 479   Assessment Seminar: Phase One Single Subject (1).

Prerequisite:  TED 478.

Assessment Seminar to complete reflective essay required for credential program Phase One for all candidates in the Single Subject Program.  Credit/no credit grading.

TED 480   Assessment Seminar:  Phase Two Single Subject Interns (1)

Prerequisite: TED 479.

Assessment seminar to complete reflective essay required for credential program Phase Two for University Interns in Single Subject Program. Credit/no credit grading.

TED 481   Summative Assessment Seminar:  Phase Two Single Subject Student Teachers (2).

Prerequisite: TED 479.

Summative Assessment Seminar to complete reflective essay and performance task required for credential program Phase Two for Student Teachers in Single Subject Program. Credit/no credit grading

TED  490 Seminar:  Issues in Education (1-3).

Identification of significant and persistent issues in education, to evaluate policy statements and published opinions with an awareness of elements involved.  Repeatable course.  One to three hours of seminar per week.

TED  494 Independent Study (1-3).

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor. 

Independent study taken under the supervision of a faculty member.  Repeatable course. 

TED  495  Special Topics in Teacher Education (1-6).

Selected topics in teacher education.  Repeatable course up to six units.

SPE 460    Introduction to Special Education (3).

Prerequisites:  TED 305, TED 402 or equivalent. 

Review of the field of exceptionality, including behavioral and learning characteristics of pupils with disabilities.  Examination of developmental and program needs.   Presentation of eligibility criteria, legal rights, legislation, and exemplary school programs for diverse learners with disabilities.

 

SPE 507    Special Education: Research and Trends  (1-4).

Emphasis on current trends and theories and review of research on best practices in special and general education.  Practice in promising techniques and advanced development of existing skills.  Credit/no credit grading.  Repeatable course.  A $10 materials fee may be charged. 

 

SPE 523    Field Experiences in Special and General Education for Interns with Students with Mild/Moderate/Severe Disabilities (4).

Supervised observation and evaluation of the candidate's teaching in their special education classroom of students with mild/moderate/severe disabilities.  Additional observation and participation in a general education setting is required for individuals without an elementary or secondary teaching credential.  Focus on introductory experiences and the commonalities between general and special education.  One hour seminar every week. Credit/no credit grading.

SPE 524    Advanced Leadership Management and Curriculum Modification for Diverse Learners with Disabilities (3).

Prerequisites:  For Special Education Candidates:  SPE 460 and SPE 561; for Educational Administration Candidates:  GED 503 and EAD 506; for School Psychology Candidates:  SPE 460 and PPS 520.

Examination of major legal, policy, and education issues confronting special educators, families and individuals with disabilities today.  Evaluation of specific instructional strategies, resources, and data-based decision making procedures.  Emphasis on collaboration among constituents and coordination of services.

SPE 527    Resource Specialist I:  Program Planning (3).

Prerequisite:  Clear Special Education Credential. 

Surveys current special education laws and practices regulating appropriate identification, assessment, program planning, placement, parent appeal, and coordination of services for the education of the mildly handicapped in public and private schools. 

SPE 528    Advanced Collaboration, Consultation, and Communication for Special Education Specialists (3).

Prerequisite:  Possession of a Ryan (pre-1998) Special Education Credential or Admission to Level II of the new (post-1998) California Special Education Credential

Elaboration on skills needed to fulfill the role of special education specialist with focus on consultation, collaboration, and staff development.  Generalization of strategies for becoming effective decision maker/service providers to individuals with mild/moderate, moderate/severe disabilities; early childhood-secondary settings.  Field projects. 

SPE 529    Advanced Assessment Instruction and Curriculum Modification for Mild/Moderate Disabilities (3).

Prerequisite:  Possession of a Ryan (pre-1998) Special Education Credential or Admission to Level II of the new (post-1998) California Special Education Credential

Application of current formal and informal assessment techniques and outcome-driven educational programming for students with mild/moderate disabilities.  Promising curriculum adaptation, self-advocacy, and data-based decision making procedures designed to facilitate participation in the core curriculum.  Field projects. 

SPE 530    Introduction to Assistive Technology (3). 

Reviews the use of Assistive Technology as it relates to education, communication, vocation, recreation, and mobility for individuals with disabilities.  Explore types of assistive technologies, functional assessments, resources, and district responsibilities. 

SPE 531    Basic Assistive Technology (3). 

Provides information regarding design and development of basic assistive technologies, compares human and system performance, and details the development of system interfaces and switches.  

SPE 532    Advanced Assistive Technology (3). 

Prerequisites:  SPE 530 and SPE 531. 

Teaches students to use and adapt a variety of assistive technology devices and software and apply these technologies in a wide range of integrated educational settings. 

SPE 533    Administration of Assistive Technology Services (3). 

Prerequisites:  SPE 530 and SPE 531. 

Provides students with information on a variety of administrative issues, including the role of the Transdisciplinary Team, identification of funding and other resources, specialized computer adaptations, legal and ethical issues, and effective evaluation. 

SPE 537    Capstone Course in Assistive Technology (3). 

Prerequisites:  SPE 532 and SPE 533. 

Students will apply assistive technology skills by performing functional assessments, developing technology goals/objectives, and selecting appropriate assistive technology services for the disabled. 

SPE 541    Special Education Pre-Induction Planning for Preliminary Level I Interns (1).

Development of a professional individual induction plan by university intern candidates at the beginning of their credential appropriate program.  Roles and responsibilities of university advisor, employing agencies, support providers, and candidates are discussed.  Credit/no credit  grading.

SPE 542    Special Education Planning Review/Supervision Seminar for Preliminary Level Interns (1).

Review and updating of the professional individualized induction plan by university intern candidates at the midpoint of their program.  Progress toward the induction plan goals is evaluated by the intern, the university supervisor, and the district support provider. Credit/no credit grading.

SPE 544    Special Education Pre-Induction Planning Professional Clear Level II (1).

Prerequisite:  Preliminary Level I credential Mild/Moderate, Moderate/Severe, Early Childhood Special Education completed subject matter.

Development of a professional individualized  induction plan for special education candidate who holds a valid preliminary Level I Credential and is employed as a public school special education teacher. Credit/no credit grading.

SPE 545    Multicultural Strategies for Culturally and Linguistically Different Exceptional Learners (3).

Course is designed to help teachers prepare and implement appropriate strategies for the identification, education and informal assessment of linguistically different exceptional learners.  Included are strategies for working with parents and paraprofessionals.   Projects requiring field experience included. 

SPE 546    Special Education Post-Induction Evaluation Supervision (3).

Prerequisite: SPE 544, Student Teaching Option or Clear Level I Credential Students; SPE 541 and SPE 542 for Interns.

Evaluation of professional individualized induction plan (PIIP) for university interns Preliminary Level I or Professional Clear Level II credential candidates.  Credit/no credit grading.

SPE 551    Biomedical Information and Technological Interventions with Children with Disabilities (3). 

Prerequisite:  SPE 460 and SPE 558. 

Review of physical disabilities, presentation, etiology, behavioral/psychosocial sequelae, and impact on development.  Medical care required for monitoring and ongoing management, technological procedures, and accommodations to facilitate full inclusion of medically fragile children in school and community settings.  Field experience included. 

SPE 552    Cultural Competence and Intervention for Family Systems (3). 

Prerequisite:  SPE 460. 

Concepts of diversity, multiculturalism, and family systems.  Development of cultural competence to work effectively with children with special needs and their families.  Culturally responsive practices in providing early intervention services. 

SPE 553    Assessment and transitions in Early Childhood Special Education (3). 

Prerequisites:  SPE 460 and SPE 558. 

Practice in current assessment procedures for children (birth to 5 years) with developmental disabilities and delays.  Role of parents in assessment, planning, and transitioning.  Development of objectives based on assessment data and family concerns. 

SPE 554    Curriculum and Instruction in Early Childhood Special Education (3). 

Prerequisites:  SPE 460,  SPE 553 and SPE 559 . 

Current issues and best practices research in designing curriculum for children (birth to 5 years) with disabilities or who are at risk.  Instructional intervention procedures and educational settings appropriate to the learner's developmental and functional needs. 

SPE 555    Practicum Directed Teaching in Early Childhood Special Education (5). 

Prerequisite:  SPE 460,  SPE 551, SPE 552, SPE 553, SPE 554, SPE 558, SPE 559 , SPE 560, and SPE 561. 

Supervised teaching in a multicultural/multi-ethnic public or private education program for children (birth to 5 years) with disabilities or who are at risk.  Collaboration, coordination of services, and management of curriculum, assessment, instruction, behavior, and professional relations.  One hour of seminar in addition to supervised teaching.

SPE 556    Experiences in General and Special Education, Student Teaching Option (4).

Prerequisite:  SPE 460 and SPE 558.

Supervised observation and participation in general and special education settings (50 hours in general education and 50 hours in special education).  General education experience focuses on classroom interactions and teaching responsibilities with students in pre-school through high school settings.  Special Education experience focuses on classroom interactions and teaching responsibilities with students of mild/moderate/severe disabilities in infant through adult population.  One hour seminar every week. Credit/no credit grading.

SPE 558    Managing Learning Environments in Special and General Education (3).

Prerequisite:  SPE 460. 

Survey and practice of research-based techniques for managing and motivating the behavior of students at-risk, or with mild, moderate or severe disabilities in special or general education settings.  Examination of current laws, regulations and practices regarding behavior management in special education.  Field projects included. 

SPE 559    Field Experiences:  Infant, Toddler, and Preschool Intervention (4).

Prerequisite:  SPE 460 and SPE 558.

Supervised fieldwork in assessment, instruction, management, and evaluation of young children with diverse disabilities at various developmental levels and in a variety of environments.  Emphasis on intervention and teaming in a family-centered approach.  Examination of commonalities and differences among learners.

SPE 560    Language/Speech Development, Disabilities and Alternative Communication Systems (3).

Prerequisite:  SPE 460. 

Examination of basic concepts of language and communication, normal and disordered speech and language development; relevant diagnostic-prescriptive methods for the classroom teacher; and the use of specialized services including alternative communication systems.  Emphasis on theoretical perspectives; cultural differences and the relationship between language disorders and academic learning.  Field projects. 

SPE 561    Typical and Atypical Developmental & Assessment Issues in Special & General Education (3).

Prerequisite:  SPE 460 and SPE 558

Focus on typical and atypical cognitive, social/emotional & physiological development of young children and youth.  Characteristics, behaviors, eligibility criteria, and service delivery models for students with mild to severe disabilities.  Introduction to assessment concepts related to special and general education. 

SPE 562    Advanced Behavior, Emotional and Environmental Supports (3).

Prerequisite: SPE 558. 

Demonstration of advanced knowledge in the area of positive behavior intervention.  Implementation of classroom behavioral systems, on-going assessment of behavior change, collaboration with community agencies, and development of plans for complex behavior change, collaboration with community agencies, and development of plans for complex behavioral and emotional needs.  Field projects. 

SPE 563    Transition Planning and Counseling in Special Education (3).

Prerequisite:  SPE 460. 

Information on transition practices for students with disabilities at various age and functioning levels.  Overview of counseling techniques and strategies for working with individuals with special needs and their families.  Relevant research, laws and regulations, and emerging practices.  Field projects. 

SPE 564    Instructional Planning and Curriculum Development for Individuals with Moderate/Severe Disabilities (3).

Prerequisites:  SPE 460 and SPE 558. 

Formal and informal assessment, instructional planning, and curriculum development for children and adults with moderate/severe disabilities.  Assessment of skills leading to functional independence in age-appropriate, developmental, domestic, community, recreation/leisure, vocational, and social environments.  Field projects. 

SPE 565    Instructional Strategies for Individuals with Moderate/Severe Disabilities  (3).

Prerequisite:  SPE 460 and SPE 558.

Review of current issues and research on effective teaching practices for students with moderate/severe disabilities.  Practice in developing and delivering curricula appropriate to the student’s development and functional needs.  Generalization of effective teaching techniques to a variety of skill areas and environments.  Field projects. 

SPE 566    Directed Teaching of Individuals with Moderate/Severe Disabilities (5).

Prerequisites:  Student must be in the last semester of Level I credential program.

Supervised teaching as an approved public school program for individuals with moderate/severe disabilities.  Focuses on the management of curriculum, behavior, and instruction and on professional relations appropriate to teaching in school and community settings.  One hour of seminar every week in addition to supervision. Credit/no credit grading.

SPE 567    Instructional Planning and Curriculum Development for Individuals with Mild/Moderate Disabilities (3).

Prerequisite:  SPE 460 and SPE 558.

Acquisition of knowledge and skill in using formal and informal assessment and evaluation procedures for individuals with mild/moderate disabilities.  Assessment information used to develop appropriate individual educational plans and curriculum management systems.  Field projects. 

SPE 568    Instructional Strategies for Individuals with Mild/Moderate Disabilities (3).

Prerequisite:  For Special Education Candidates:  SPE 460 and SPE 558; for School Psychology Candidates:  SPE 460 and PPS 565.

Current issues and research surveyed regarding effective teaching practices.  Preview/evaluation of methods, materials, and technology.  Generalization of effective teaching and evaluative techniques to various curricula and content areas appropriate for students with mild/moderate disabilities.  Field projects. 

SPE 569    Directed Teaching of Individuals with Mild/Moderate Disabilities (5).

Prerequisites:  Student must be in last semester of Level I credential program.

Supervised teaching in an approved public school education program for students with mild/moderate disabilities.  Focuses on the management of curriculum, behavior, and instruction and on professional relations appropriate to teaching in elementary secondary and post secondary special education programs.  One hour of seminar every week in addition to supervised teaching.  Credit/no credit grading.

SPE 576    Student Teaching of Individuals with Moderate/Severe Disabilities (5).

Prerequisites:  Student must be in last semester of Level I Credential Program.

Supervised teaching with the guidance of a master teacher in an appropriate public school special education program for students with moderate/severe disabilities.  Focus on the management of curriculum, behavior, and instruction.  One hour of seminar in addition to supervision. Credit/no credit grading.

SPE 579    Student Teaching of Individuals with Mild/Moderate Disabilities (5).

Prerequisites:  Student must be in last semester of Level I Credential Program.

Supervised teaching with the guidance of a master teacher in an appropriate public school special education program for students with mild/moderate disabilities.  Focus on the management of curriculum, behavior and instruction.  One hour of seminar in addition to supervision. CR/NC grading.

SPE 591    Current Issues in Special Education (2).

Prerequisite:  Completion of all course work leading to the M.A. in Special Education. 

Designed to help the graduate student in special education integrate all previous course work in the field. Legal and empirical evidence bearing on specific current issues will be reviewed and used as the basis of class discussion.  CR/NC grading.  Two hours of seminar per week.

TED  435 Student Teaching:  Elementary (12).

Prerequisite:  Advancement to fieldwork status.

Student teaching with a master teacher in a culturally/ethnically diverse elementary classroom.  Credit/no credit grading.

TED  455 Student Teaching:  Secondary (12).

Prerequisite: Advancement to Fieldwork status; concurrent enrollment in  TED 411, TED 456, and TED 469. 

Student teaching with master teachers at the junior and senior high school level in multilingual/multicultural/multiethnic classrooms. Credit/no credit  grading.

TED 469   Interdisciplinary Teaching Methods  (3).

Prerequisite:  Acceptance to intern status in single subject program or advancement to fieldwork status; TED 467 and TED 468; TED 406 recommended.

Explores interdisciplinary teaching methods for the multicultural multilingual classroom including psychological, philosophical perspectives.  Presents strategies, practices, and resources for developing an integrated curriculum.

SPE 543    Special Education Pre-Induction Planning Supervision (1).

Development of an individualized professional induction plan for each special education candidate upon completion of the final directed field experience (i.e. SPE 555, SPE 566 or SPE 569 in Level II standard credential programs or SPE 523 for Interns in Level I intern credential programs).  Credit/no credit grading.

 

ENG 088   Developmental Reading (3).

(no baccalaureate credit) 

Intensive work in basic reading and writing skills with emphasis on college-level reading and writing.  CSU English Placement Test scores of T-141 or below are required to complete this course prior to enrolling in ENG 110.  May be taken concurrently with ENG 099.  Graded CR/NC. 

ENG 099   Basic Writing Workshop (3).

(no baccalaureate credit)

English Placement Test T-scores of T-150 or lower.  Focus on clear, correct sentences, with an introduction to paragraphing in the context of the essay.  Essays concentrate on narrative and personal experience leading to critical exposition.  May be taken concurrently with ENG 088.  Graded CR/NC. 

ENG 110   Freshman Composition I (3).

Prerequisite: English Placement Test T-score above 150 or EPT T-score of 141 or below and ENG 088 and 099 or EPT T-score ranging from T-142 to T-150 and ENG 099.

Basic writing skills emphasizing exposition and textual analysis.  Graded A-C/NC.

ENG 111   Freshman Composition II (3).

Prerequisite: ENG 110 or equivalent.

Reinforcement of basic writing skills with emphasis on persuasion and argumentation, including a documented essay. Aids in writing convincing arguments and assembling, organizing, and documenting evidence supporting a thesis. Graded A-C/NC. 

ENG 230   Appreciation of Literature (3).

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Ways of reading literature to enhance understanding, appreciation, and enjoyment.  Requires frequent writing assignments. 

ENG 271   Writers’ Workshop (3).

Prerequisites:  ENG 110 and ENG 111 or their equivalents.

Experiences in creative writing through encounters with selected literary works.

ENG 302   English Literature to 1642 (3).

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Survey of British poetry, drama, and prose to 1642.

ENG 303   English Literature: 1642-1832 (3).

Prerequisite: ENG 111.

Survey of British poetry, drama, and prose, 1642-1832.

ENG 304   English Literature: 1832 -Present (3).

Prerequisite: ENG 111.

Survey of British poetry, drama, and prose, 1832-present.

ENG 305    Critical Reading of Literature (3). 

Prerequisite:  ENG 111. 

Analysis of literature to develop critical reading skills.  Intended for students in Liberal Studies and Linguistics; may not be counted toward major/minor in English with Literature option.  Written exercises required. 

ENG 306   Backgrounds of Western Literature (3).

Prerequisite: ENG 111.

Analysis of Old and New Testaments, Greek and Roman myths, and literature based on these.  Recommended for Spanish and French majors.

ENG 307   Practice in Literary Criticism (3).

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Practice in literary criticism from contemporary theoretical perspectives.  For Literature majors and minors in English.  Written exercises regularly required.

ENG 308   Critical Approaches to Children’s Literature (3).

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Critical approaches to children's literature with emphasis on topics such as history, genre, style, and image.  Course may cover works through adolescent literature. 

ENG 310   The Study of Language (3).

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Traditional and modern approaches to the study of language.  Fundamentals of phonology and grammar.  (Same as FRE 310.) 

ENG 311   Phonology (3).

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

The phonetics of a variety of languages and the phonetic phenomena that occur in natural languages.  Practice in the perception and transcription of such phenomena. Introduction to the traditional and current views of phonological theory. 

ENG 312   Morphology (3).

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Descriptive and historical (etymological) analysis of the structure of words in English and other languages:  common roots, base forms, and affixes; rules of word formation; semantic change. 

ENG 314   English Syntax:  Traditional   (3).

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

The structure and meaning of sentences, approached through traditional models of grammar; the role of syntax in writing and composition.

ENG 315.  English Syntax:  Generative-Transformational (3).

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

The structure and meaning of sentences, approached through the generative-transformational model of grammar; the role of syntax in writing and composition. 

ENG 317   Sociolinguistics: Black English (3).

Prerequisite: ENG 111.

The linguistic features and the social, cultural, and historical background of Black English, with an emphasis on how it relates to other English dialects and its educational implications. 

ENG 325   Poetry (3).

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Analysis of various forms of poetry, with an emphasis on American and British writers from various eras. Written exercises required.

ENG 326   Prose Fiction (3).

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Forms of prose fiction from different periods and national literatures.  Written exercises required.

ENG 327   Drama (3).

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Forms of drama by major playwrights from different periods and national literatures.  Written exercises required.

ENG 340   American Literature to 1865 (3).

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Intensive study of selected American works. 

ENG 341   American Literature: 1865-Present (3).

Prerequisite: ENG 111.

Intensive study of selected American works. 

ENG 343   African-American Poetry and Drama (3).

Prerequisite: ENG 111.

Historical development of African-American poetry from its roots.  Study of major African-American plays.  Focus on poetry and drama as media informing particular aspects and textures of the Black American experience. 

ENG 344   African-American Prose (3). 

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Selected African-American works of fiction and non-fiction. Analysis of themes, techniques and symbols.  Special attention given to folkloric elements; i.e., blues, dozens, folktales, etc., as they are employed in the literature. 

ENG 347   Literature of Ethnicity and Gender  (3).

Prerequisite:  ENG 111

Readings in such areas as Latino American, Asian American, and women's literature.  Topic will vary.  May be repeated up to six units for the major or minor in English. 

ENG 350   Advanced Composition (3).

Prerequisite: ENG 111 or equivalent.

Rhetorical modes, techniques of emphasis, strategies of editing and revising.  May not be counted toward major/minor or M.A. in English except for teacher candidates; may count only twice toward elective credit.  Satisfies graduation competency-in-writing requirement.  Graded A-C/NC.  Repeatable course.  Fee required.

ENG 351   Composition for Elementary School Teachers (3).

Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the GWAR.

Advanced writing course.  Focus on children’s writing development, writing process and techniques for teaching composition, and further development of writing abilities of prospective elementary school teachers. 

ENG 352   Writing and Speaking Skills ­­­­­for Management (3).

Prerequisites:  Satisfaction of the GWAR.

Principles and skills of effective communication within organizational management.  This course concentrates on eliciting desired responses through various types of business communication in writing.  May be counted only once toward major/minor and twice for elective credit.  Graded A-C/NC. Repeatable course. 

ENG 413   History of the English Language (3).

Prerequisite: ENG 111.

The evolution of English from its Indo-European origins, through Old and Middle English, to the rise and spread of Modern English.

ENG 414   American English (3).

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

American English from colonial times to the present.  Contacts with native, colonial, and immigrant languages and regional, social, and ethnic dialects. 

ENG 419   Psycholinguistics (3).

Prerequisites:  ENG 111 and ENG 310 or ENG 314 or one course in psychology.

Current theory and research in the psychology of language and its historical background, including experiments on speech production and comprehension, acquisition of language by children, and disorders of speech and language. 

ENG 420   Linguistic Analysis (3).

Prerequisites: ENG 111 and ENG 311 or ENG 314.

Descriptive and formal analysis of phonological, syntactic, and/or historical data from a variety of human languages.  Repeatable course. 

ENG 435   Readings in World Literature (3).

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Intensive study of selected major writers from the world’s literature, read in translation. 

ENG 451   Creative Writing (3).

Prerequisites:  ENG 111 and consent of instructor.

Practice in various forms of imaginative writing.  Repeatable course. 

ENG 457   Advanced Composition for Teachers (3).

Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the GWAR.

Advanced writing course for prospective secondary school teachers, designed to develop understanding of writing process and techniques for teaching composition.  Course also stresses development of students’ own strengths as writers. 

ENG 465   Chaucer (3).

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Chaucer’s major poetry, its historical and literary background.

ENG 467   Shakespeare (3).

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Selected comedies, histories, and tragedies. 

ENG 468   Milton (3).

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

The major works of Milton. 

ENG 485   Studies in Literature, Composition, and Reading (3).

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Practice in devising strategies appropriate to the needs of students in grades 7-12.  Emphasis on techniques of developing language skills, of analyzing genres, of making literature accessible, and of generating essay topics from that literature.  Papers regularly required.  Course required for Subject Matter Preparation Program in English. 

ENG 486   Studies in Language and Literature (TESL) (3).

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Intensive study of linguistic and literary materials for teachers of English as a Second language. 

ENG 487   Introduction to Second-Language Learning and Teaching (3).

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Focus on linguistic, social, and cultural factors in schooling language-diverse students.  Areas of concentration include first and second-language acquisition, history of second-language teaching, current second-language theoretical frameworks, and dual language teaching strategies. 

ENG 490   Seminar in Literature (3).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Intensive study of one or more authors, a single historical period, a literary movement or genre, or an aspect of literary criticism.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 492   Seminar in Linguistics (3).

Prerequisites: Senior standing and consent of instructor.

Investigations in the historical and/or theoretical foundations of modern linguistics. Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 494   Independent Study (1-4).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

Intense reading or an original research project or creative writing under faculty supervision.  Arrangements must be made a semester in advance of registration.  Repeatable course. 

ENG 497   Directed Reading (1-4).

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and department chair.

Extensive reading in selected areas under faculty supervision.  Repeatable course. 

 

ENG 501  Advanced Studies in Literature (3). 

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair. 

Introduction to graduate study in English.  Critical reading of primary and secondary sources (including evaluation of secondary sources within the context of past and current arenas of critical discourse); bibliographic resources; writing about literature; ethics and conventions of presentation and documentation.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 513   History of the English Language (3).

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor and department chair.

The evolution of English from its Indo-European origins, through Old and Middle English, to the rise and spread of Modern English.

ENG 514   American English (3).

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor and department chair.

American English from colonial times to the present.  Contacts with native, colonial and immigrant languages and regional, social and ethnic dialects.

ENG 530   Seminar: Studies in Medieval Literature  (3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair. 

A study of major works in English literature before 1500.  Some focus on major continental analogues and critical methodology.  Majority of the texts read in translation.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 535   Seminar:  Studies in Renaissance Literature  (3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

Major works in English literature from 1500-1660.  Emphasis on such representative writers as More, Spenser, Shakespeare, Marlowe, Jonson, Donne, Bacon and Milton.  May include continental contemporaries such as Montaigne and Machiavelli.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 540   Seminar:  Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature (1660-1798) (3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair. 

Literature of the Restoration, Neoclassic, and Sensibility eras.  May include readings that provide historical, philosophical, or cultural content.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 543   Seminar:  Studies in Romantic Literature (1798-1832) (3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

Selected studies in the Romantic movement in English literature, including such precursors as Burns and Blake.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 545   Literary Criticism (3) FS.

Prerequisites:  ENG 307 or its equivalent and consent of instructor and department chair.

Major works in literary criticism selected from Plato to the present. 

ENG 546   Seminar:  Studies in Victorian Literature (1832-1901) (3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

A study of major writers from the Great Reform Bill to the fin de siecle with an emphasis on literary responses to emerging scientific thought, social consciousness, and religious issues.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 549   Seminar:  Studies in Modern British Literature (3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

Selected literary study of the modern period in England, Ireland, and the Commonwealth, as typified by such novelists and poets as Conrad, Yeats, Lawrence, Joyce, Woolf, Forster, Eliot, Auden, Thomas, Greene, and Lessing.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 552   Seminar:  Studies in American Literature (1836-1917) (3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

Selected study of major American writing from the American Renaissance to the First World War.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 555   Seminar:  Studies in Modern American Literature (3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

Study of works by American authors since the Lost Generation. Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 570   Seminar in Writing (3). 

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair. 

Intensive training in writing.  Advanced study of techniques of prose discourse.  Frequent writing assignments.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 571   Discourse Analysis (3). 

Analysis and description of structures and functions of language beyond the sentence level.  May include textual and conversational analysis; classical rhetorical canons; speech acts; scripts/information structures; cohesion, coherence, deixis; spoken and written discourse.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 575   The Teaching
of Composition (3).

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and department chair.

Theory and practice in teaching composition.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 576   History and Theories of Rhetoric (3).

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and department chair.

Major theories of rhetoric from ancient Greece to the present.  Role of rhetoric in the history of ideas. Emphasis on multiple notions of rhetoric and attitudes toward it.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 577   Current Issues in Rhetoric and Composition (3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

Intensive study of selected topics in rhetoric and composition such as invention and the teaching of writing, issues in literacy instruction, rhetoric and contemporary culture, composition and cognitive development, the composing process in a rhetorical framework, linguistic approaches to rhetoric.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 582   Seminar: Linguistic Analysis  (3).

Seminar in the descriptive and formal analysis of phonological, syntactic, and/or historical data from a variety of human languages.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 583   Seminar:  Psycholinguistics (3).

Seminar in current theory and research in the psychology of language and its historical background, speech production and comprehension, acquisition of language, disorders of speech and language.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 584   Seminar:  Sociolingusitcs  (3).

Examinations of varieties of English and social aspects of language use.  Topics include dialectology, pidgin and creoles, bilingualism, code-switching, and intercultural communication.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 585   Second Language Acquisition (3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

Theories of second-language acquisition second-language learning, bilingualism, and sociocultural variables of language uses, with particular emphasis on the young adult and adult learner.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 586   Teaching Language and Literature in the ESL Context (3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

Intensive study of linguistic and literary materials for ESL teachers.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 587   Seminar:  Current Issues in TESL/Applied Linguistics  (3).

Intensive study of selected topics in TESL/Applied Linguistics such as ESL Writing/Composition, Reading and Vocabulary Acquisition, Pedagogy of Spoken English, Curriculum and Program Design, Testing/Evaluation.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 588   Pedagogical Grammar for TESOL (3).

Examination of areas of English grammar typically taught to non-native speakers.  To familiarize prospective ESL teachers with classroom terminology, techniques and materials.  Develop ability to analyze and explain grammatical phenomena in terms accessible to ESL students. 

ENG 590   Seminar in Literature  (3).

Prerequisite: Consent of chair.

Study of a writer, period,  genre, theme, or problem in literature. Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 592   Seminar:  Topics in Linguistics (3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

Advanced topics in phonological, syntactic, historical-comparative or contrastive theory and analysis.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 594   Independent Study (1-4) FS.

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and department chair.

In consultation with a faculty member, the student will investigate in detail current scholarship in some area, or will undertake a project involving original research or creative writing.  Repeatable course. 

ENG 595   Selected Topics (3).

An intensive study of a selected issues in literature or linguistics.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 597   Directed Reading (1-4). 

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and department chair.

Extensive reading in selected areas under the guidance of a faculty mentor.  Repeatable course. 

ENG 600   Graduate Continuation Course (0).

Graduate students who have completed their coursework but not their thesis, project, or comprehensive examination, or who have other requirements remaining for the completion of their degree, may maintain continuous attendance by enrolling in this course.  Signature of graduate program coordinator required.

 

ENG 433   Thematic Approaches to Literature (3).

Prerequisite: ENG 111.

An exploration of literature organized around such themes as Women Writers or Death and Dying, using works from a variety of cultures and historical periods.  Repeatable course. 

ENG 477   Individual Authors (3). 

Prerequisite:  ENG 111.

Works of one or more major authors, such as Spenser or Austen or Baldwin and Morrison.  Course may be repeated with new content.  May be counted twice toward major or minor. 

ENG 591   Integrative Seminar in Literature  (3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

Comparative study of genres, literary movements, or authors over more than one period.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

ENG 593   Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

Survey of research methods in applied linguistics, including problem description, data collection and analysis, interpretation of results.  Preparation of Final Project.  Three hours of seminar per week.  Repeatable but may count only once toward the MA degree.

ADX 300   Introduction to Alcoholism (3).

This course provides basic information about alcohol: the physiological, psychological and sociological effects of alcohol abuse; identification of social drinking, problem drinking; etiological theories of alcoholism; defense mechanisms; the counseling relationship and basic treatment issues.

ADX 301   Introduction to Counseling Techniques  (3).

This course introduces the skills and techniques necessary for counseling. Students will learn to use active listening skills and to develop a high empathy level. The course is both theoretical and experiential.

ADX 302   Counseling the Individual (3).

Prerequisites:  ADX 300 and ADX 301

This course develops an understanding of the psychological factors in alcoholism and drug abuse and their implications for treatment. Counseling techniques are examined and practiced including assessment, perception and communication skills required for various stages of treatment, prognosis and termination.

ADX 303   Perspectives on Drug Abuse: Counseling the Substance Abuser (3).

Prerequisites:  ADX 300 and ADX 301

This course is an introduction to this major social/psychological problem. Students learn the basic pharmacology of the commonly encountered street drugs and behavioral and physiological consequences of drug abuse. Poly-addiction and treatment modalities are also covered.

ADX 304   Group Counseling Techniques (3).

Prerequisites:  ADX 300 and ADX 301

This course provides an understanding of group dynamics, defenses, problems, goals and growth. The roles of the group facilitator and group members are examined and practiced in class.

ADX 305   Introductory Practicum (2).

Prerequisites:  ADX 300 and ADX 301

This course introduces the student to the applied counseling experience. They become knowledgeable about community resources, learn documentation techniques, charting, and case studies. Issues related to grief, loss, stress, and counselor burn-out are addressed.

ADX 306   Family Dynamics (3).

Prerequisites:  ADX 300 and ADX 301

This course introduces theories of the effects of substance abuse (alcohol and drugs) as they relate to the family system. Students gain insight into the identification and solution of problems of the pathologic family and the individual roles and behavior patterns that exist within it.

ADX 307   Advanced Practicum (2).

Prerequisites:  ADX 300 and ADX 305

This course demonstrates how to link clients with community resources. The student learns charting techniques, becomes aware of the needs of special populations and develops a further understanding of the counselor-client relationship, including confidentiality and legal aspects. The student learns about the multi-disciplinary treatment team, how to take histories and make psychosocial evaluations. The various alcoholism treatment agencies and program modalities-their staffing, funding, operational procedures are studied.

ADX 308   Treatment of Eating Disorders (3).

An introduction to the treatment of eating disorders such as Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia, Compulsive Eating, and Obesity. Biological, psychoanalytic, behavioral, psychosocial, and other theoretical perspectives are explored. The history of the interrelationship of alcohol and food as substances sometimes abused is explored. The course will provide an overview of techniques necessary for counseling individuals with eating problems.

ADX 309   Treatment of Domestic Violence (3).

Designed for facilitators of domestic violence treatment groups and to partially meet the requirements of California state law regulating approved domestic violence treatment programs for court-mandated counseling.  Utilizes several cognitive-behavioral and relationship skill-building approaches to help clients.

GED 548   Effective College Teaching (3).

Study of research, theory and practices associated with teaching and learning processes in the community college system.  Topics include course planning and organization; student diversity; teaching and student retention; instructional technology.  Offered through self support only.

GED 549   The Community College  (2).

An overview of the history, mission and function of the Community College.  Topics include the history of higher education, the role of the Community College, student characteristics, curriculum, finance, governance articulations, and the California Master Plan.  Offered through self support only.

GED 594   Independent Study:  College Teaching Internship (3).

A one semester internship consisting of classroom instruction, the equivalent of 45 hours per semester or 3 hours per week on a 15 week model.  Ordinarily, the internship consists of an appropriate combination of the classroom-related activities, determined in consultation between mentor teacher and intern.  The Internship Coordinator arranges an on-site observation of one of the intern's classroom presentations.  An assessment is made of the intern's performance and an evaluation form is filed in writing.

PSX 350   Developmental Psychology (3).

Designed for the early childhood practitioner in infant care programs and preschool/child care programs. The course studies the cognitive, psychological and social development of the child. 

TEX 351   Infant Program   Development I (3).

Designed for the infant caregiver, teacher, and administrator, this course focuses on the principles, guidelines, and processes for developing group programs for infants and toddlers.

TEX 352   Infant Program Development II (3).

A continuation of developing and instructing in group care programs for infants, this course explores play as a learning and development medium for infants and toddlers. Examines caregiving activities, developmental experiences, and sensitive caregiving practices. Current research, trends, and practical infant care issues are addressed.

TEX 353   Preschool Program Development I (3).

Examines a variety of early childhood curricula and the relationship of curriculum development to organization and instruction. Discussions include planning, development, and organizing the environment for effective teaching and learning.

TEX 355   Child, Family, and Community (3).

Focus on developing an early childhood curriculum that incorporates home and community resources. Reviews premises and practices of parent involvement in early educational programs.

TEX 356   Early Childhood Administration (3).

Designed for directors of preschool/day care programs and infant care centers, this course examines local and state regulations governing programs for young children. Program monitoring, fiscal management, personnel recruitment and selection, staff management, and program supervision are emphasized.

TEX 425   Workshop in Teaching Methods (1-3).

Study of various approaches, methods, and materials related to a selected area of the curriculum.  Development of applications at elementary and/or secondary level.  Two to six hours of activity per week.

 

APX 270   Quality Management in the Industrial Environment (3).

Prerequisite: Supervising work experience recommended.

A study directed toward productivity improvement and learning, and improving the industrial manufacturing environment. Total quality control is discussed as a tool of continuous improvement, employee job certification and certification of special manufacturing processes.

APX 272   Work Standards in Industrial Operations (3).

Prerequisite: Supervising work experience recommended.

A study of staff operations in the industrial environment including safety, space layout, scheduling and flow control of the manufacturing process. Loading shop equipment and capability analysis is discussed.

APX 303   Statistical Process Control (3).

Prerequisite: MAT 131 or equivalent.

A study of the application of SPC techniques used to control the quality of manufacturing and service operations. The course includes a brief math review, quality control statistical methods, tools and charts of SPC, study of standard deviations and sampling techniques of defined risk.

PIX 319     Introduction to Supply Chain Management (3).

Provides a broad overview of the field of Supply Chain Management and its role in the functional nature of organizations.  The fundamental concepts and specialized vocabulary of this field are covered.

PIX 331     Detailed Scheduling & Planning (3).

Prerequisite:  PIX 319.

Students focus on the various techniques for material and capacity scheduling.  The course includes detailed descriptions of material requirements planning (MRP), capacity requirements planning (CRP), inventory management practices, and procurement and supplier planning.

PIX 332     Operations Execution and Control (3).

Prerequisite:  PIX 319.

Students focus on prioritizing work, executing work plans and implementing controls, reporting activity results and providing evaluation feedback on performance.  The course explains techniques for scheduling and controlling production processes, execution of quality initiatives and control of inventories.

PIX 333     Master Planning of Resources (3).

Prerequisite:  PIX 319.

Students explore processes to develop sales and operations plans and identify and assess internal and external demand and forecasting requirements.  The course focuses on the importance of producing achievable master schedules consistent with business policies, objectives, and resource constraints.

PIX 340     Strategic Management of Resources (3).

Prerequisites:  PIX 319, PIX 331, PIX 332, and PIX 333.

Students explore the relationship of existing and emerging processes and technologies to manufacturing and supply chain-related functions.  Aligning resources with the strategic plan, configuring and integrating operating processes to support the strategic plan, and implementing change are the main topics.

PRX 200   Purchasing Fundamentals (3).

This course examines fundamental elements of purchasing.  Emphasis placed on current business trends and their impact on the purchasing profession.  Fundamental concepts, methods, techniques used to evaluate requirements for purchasing goods and services are discussed.  Case studies allow for application to real-world situations. 

PRX 310   Cost-Price Analysis and Negotiation (3).

Prerequisite: PRX 200.

This course provides an overview of the tools and techniques required for determining the reasonableness of cost and price, the relationships between the two, and establishes the basis for negotiating a final contract between buyers and sellers. 

PRX 330   Public Sector Procurement (3). 

Prerequisite: PRX 200.

This course examines the relative aspects unique to Public Sector Purchasing as well as comparing and contrasting the legal and regulatory considerations inherent to this environment with those of private sector procurement. 

PRX 340   Advanced Purchasing Concepts (3).

Prerequisite: PRX 200.

Through the detailed examination of case studies, students explore the real-world application of purchasing concepts including: specification, standardization, simplification, supply, legal and ethical issues, partnershipping, total quality procurement and logistics. 

 

 

FLG 294   Independent Study in Foreign Languages I (3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and chair of Foreign Languages. 

Beginning/intermediate individual study and or credit by examination in a foreign language not regularly offered on campus.  Arrangements must be made in advance of registration.  Repeatable course. 

FLG 494   Independent Study in a Foreign Language II (3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and chair of Foreign Languages. 

Intermediate or advanced individual study or credit by examination in a foreign language not regularly offered on campus.  Arrangements must be made in advance of registration.  Repeatable course.

 

FRE 110    Beginning French I (3).

Basic instruction in French. Training in speaking, listening, reading, and writing for students who have had no previous work in French. 

FRE 111    Beginning French II (3).

Prerequisite:  FRE 110 or consent of instructor. 

A continuation of French 110. 

FRE 220    Second-year French (3).

Prerequisite:  At least one year of college French or consent of instructor.

Individualized instruction in French language, life and letters for second-year and advanced first-year students in French.  This course taken successfully twice completes lower division requirements for the major and minor.  Repeatable course. 

FRE 305    Advanced Composition, Syntax, and Stylistics  (3).

Prerequisite:  FRE 220 or equivalent. 

A reading, composition, and discussion course concerned with elements of style and syntax, with emphasis on creative writing by students. 

FRE 450    French Culture (3).

Prerequisite:  FRE 220 or equivalent.

An area studies course focusing on patterns of French civilization and culture. 

FRE 452    French Literature I (3).

Prerequisite:  FRE 220 or equivalent.

French literature from the Middle Ages to the Revolution.

FRE 453    French Literature II (3).

Prerequisite:  FRE 220 or equivalent.

Prose and poetry of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

FRE 494    Independent Study (3).

Prerequisites:  B average in French, upper division standing, and consent of instructor and department chair.

Independent study of a literary or linguistic problem, author, or movement.  Repeatable course. 

FRE 310    The Study of Language  (3).

Traditional and modern approaches to the study of language; fundamentals of phonology and grammar (same as
ENG 310 and SPA 310). 

 

GEO 100 Human Geography (3).

Cultural, physical, and biological earth systems.  Emphasizes human geography and adaptation to physical habitats. 

GEO 200  Physical Geography (3).

Classical natural systems, including earth-sun relationships, atmospheric flows, terrestrial biogeography, landforms, and processes of change; introduction to modern monitoring methods using maps, satellite reconnaissance, and geographic information systems.

 

GEO 305 Cartography (3).

Principles, techniques, design and production of maps and graphs for data presentation. One hour of lecture and six hours of lab per week.

GEO 310 Geomorphology (3).

Study of landforms created by geologic, volcanic, weathering, fluvial, Karst coastal   and other processes acting on the land surface and ocean floor. 

GEO 315 Meteorology (3).

Composition, structure, general circulation, and storms of all latitudes.  Clouds, rain, visibility, winds, and other meteorological observations and micrometeorological observations.

GEO 350  World Geography (3).

Study of ten world regions: population distribution, landforms and natural resources urban and non-urban relationships, connections of trade and transportation, plus selected case studies involving water resources, boundaries and environmental impacts.

GEO 357  Metropolitan Los Angeles (3).

Exploration and analysis of the geography of Metropolitan Los Angeles with emphasis on the acquisition of urban geographical research methods including filed mapping, ethnography and GIS.  Focus on issues relevant to migration, community development, policing and urban ecology.

GEO 359 Geography of California (3).

The physical, cultural and regional geography of California. The land and its modifications. Spatial distribution of resources.  Population, migration and urbanization.  Problems and prospects. 

GEO 360 North America (3).

Physical, regional and cultural geography  of the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Central American and Caribbean states.  Emphasizes human-environment interaction; contemporary patterns of population distribution, resource exploitation, transportation, agricultural and industrial production.  Historical diffusion and contemporary regional specialization.

GEO 370  Numerical Methods in Geography (3).

Prerequisites: CSC 101 and MAT 009 (or equivalents).

Principles of data reduction and analysis in the natural sciences.  Practical techniques to understand spatial data sets using computer software.  Topics include matrices, summary statistics, distributions, transformations, hypothesis testing, contouring, regression and curve-fitting.

GEO 405 Advanced Cartography (3).

Prerequisite: GEO 305 or equivalent is recommended.

Planning and preparing maps, graphics, photographs, and models.  One hour lecture and six hours of lab per week.

GEO 408 Aerial Photographs and Remote Sensing Data (3).

Interpretation of physical and cultural features, resources, environmental factors from photographic and specific sensor imagery.  One hour of lecture and four hours of activity per week.

GEO 412 Hydrology (3).

Detailed study of the hydrologic cycle: evaporation, condensation, precipitation, runoff, infiltration and groundwater. 

GEO 415                Geographic Information Systems (3).

Prerequisites:  Basic computer knowledge, CSC 101 or equivalent. 

Techniques of data acquisition, processing, analysis and display as pertains to geographic information systems.  Includes practical applications based on various forms of geographically referenced data.  Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

GEO 416 Climatology (3).

Prerequisite:  GEO 315 is recommended.

Climate and climatic classification. Relationships of climate to meteorology, ecology, diet, housing, transportation, agriculture, industrialization and natural resources. 

GEO 420 Natural Resources (3).

Atmospheric, hydrologic, ecologic and geologic principles; economic and environmental considerations in air, water, soil, food, timber, wildlife, nonmetallic and metallic resources. 

GEO 433 Environmental Analysis and Planning (3).

Federal and State requirements, required inputs, presentation formats, procedures for review and acceptance of environmental reports.  Methods of assessing air quality, noise, water pollution and traffic problems. 

GEO 494 Independent Study  (1-3).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

Independent Study of a particular geographic or environmental problem under the supervision of a member of the Geography staff.

GEO 495 Special Topics in Geography (3). 

Selected topics in Geography with course content to be determined by instructor. Repeatable course. 

GEO 498 Directed Research  (1-3).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

Directed research of a particular geographic or environmental problem under the direction of a member of the Geography staff.

 

GEO 336 Land Use (3).

Sequential, compatible, and conflicting land uses.  Zoning and regulation.  Impacts of public and private uses.  Social and economic benefits from alternative land use.

GEO 346 Political Geography (3).

The characteristics, patterns, and interactions of contemporary political processes and organizations over the world.  Cohesion, unity, disunity, growth and historical persistence from the locality, through nations and transnational groupings to the  world. 

 

EAR 100   Physical Geology (3).

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in EAR 101 is recommended.

Volcanoes, earthquakes, oceanic processes and continental drift.  Rock and mineral identification is enhanced by concurrent enrollment in EAR 101.  Meets certain general studies requirements (is fundamental to Earth Sciences majors/minors), and has wide-ranging applications in art, commerce, public policy, and science.
Field Trip.

EAR 101   Physical Geology Laboratory (1).

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in EAR 100 is recommended.

Nature and origin of rocks and minerals through determination of physical properties of specimens. Topographic and geologic map analysis. Geological features from stereoscopic air photos. Recommended elective for students interested in the outdoors, archaeology, mineral deposits, land use, and natural hazards. 

EAR 200   Earth History and Evolution (3).

Prerequisites:  EAR 100, EAR 101, and concurrent enrollment in EAR 201 are recommended.

Geological and biological history of the earth. Includes development of the geologic time scale, origin of the earth and life, the fossil record and evolution, and plate tectonics.  Special emphasis on the geology of North America. Philosophical implications make this a valuable general elective for all students. 

EAR 201   Earth History Laboratory (1).

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in EAR 200 is recommended.

Practical laboratory experience in fossil identification.  Life history, form, function and evolution of animals and plants important in the fossil record. Interpretation of geologic maps and stratigraphic correlation of sedimentary rocks.  Three hours of laboratory per week.

EAR 356   Mineralogy (4).

Prerequisites:  EAR 100, EAR 101 and CHE 110 are required; CHE 112 is recommended.

Systematic study of the most common rock forming and ore minerals.  Classification of crystals through determination of symmetry of crystal faces. Emphasis is on the identification of minerals by physical properties and qualitative chemical analysis.  Two hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week.

EAR 358   Petrology (4).

Prerequisite:  EAR 356.

Origin, occurrence and classification of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Phase equilibria, binary and ternary diagrams, significance of outcrop features. Development of skills in describing and interpreting hand specimens.  Field trips.  Two hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week.

EAR 366   Stratigraphy (4).

Prerequisites:  EAR 200 and EAR 201 are required; EAR 356 and EAR 358 are recommended.

Interpretation of sedimentary environments through the study of bedding, grain size, fossils and sedimentary structures.  Includes correlation and stratigraphic columns.  Hand specimen and field analysis of sedimentary rocks.  Has applications to geography, anthropology, biology, and oceanography.  Two hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week.

EAR 370   Oceanography (3).

Prerequisite:  EAR 100 is recommended.

Physical and chemical characteristics of seawater. Distribution of temperatures and salinity.  Study of currents, tides, waves and the influence of the sea on weather and on life. Of interest to students as a general elective. 

EAR 376   Field Methods of Mapping (3).

Techniques of preparing base maps with transit, tape, plane table and alidade. Brunton compass traverse methods.  Introduction to geologic mapping. Applications to real estate, anthropology, construction engineering, government agencies or industries using maps.  One hour of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week.

EAR 386   Structural Geology  (4).

Prerequisites: EAR 100 and EAR 101 are required; EAR 200, EAR 201 are recommended.

Mechanics of rock deformation.  Interpretation and classification of folds and faults.  Graphical projections for location of subsurface features on geologic maps and cross sections. Use of stereonet. Plate tectonic implications.  Two hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week.

EAR 464   Paleontology (3).

Prerequisites:  EAR 200 and EAR 201.

Reviews the principles of paleontology, including biology (modes of life, growth, reproduction), morphology, phylogeny and classification, evolution, paleoecology, and biogeography.  Lab:  identification of fossils and application to stratigraphy.  Emphasis is on invertebrate fossils.  Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

EAR 476   Hydrogeology (3).

Prerequisites: CHE 110, EAR 100 and EAR 101

Interrelationships of geologic materials and processes with water. Topics include: hydrologic cycle, physical characteristics of aquifers, groundwater flow, wells, geology of flow systems, groundwater chemistry, and criteria for development and management of water resources. Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

EAR 490   Senior Seminar in Earth Sciences (1).

Prerequisite: Senior standing in Earth Sciences or consent of instructor.

Study and discussion of current research in Earth Sciences. Seminar topics of concentration include: Geological Dating Techniques, Evolution and the Fossil Record, and Geology of the Pleistocene and Man.  Techniques of oral presentation, library research and preparation of audiovisual materials.  One hour of seminar per week.

EAR 494   Independent Study (1-3).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Laboratory, library or field exercises to develop knowledge and skills in areas of special interest to the student. May include guided field trips when offered.  CR/NC grading.  Repeatable course.

EAR 495   Advanced Topics in Earth Sciences (3,4).

Prerequisite:  Senior standing in Earth Sciences or consent of instructor.

Systematic studies in such topics as optical mineralogy, petrography, ore deposits and geophysics.  Utilizes specialties of visiting professors where possible.  Oriented toward development of professional skills through practical laboratory or field experience.  Repeatable course.  Two hours of lecture and three or six hours of laboratory per week.

EAR 496   Internship in Earth Sciences (2,3).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Employment as an assistant or volunteer in an earth sciences-related firm or government agency.  Course may run at time convenient to student and employers, including summer.  Student should contact Department faculty three months prior to enrollment.  CR/NC grading.  Repeatable course.

EAR 498   Directed Research (1-3).

Prerequisite: Senior standing is recommended.

Laboratory, library or field research investigations intended to produce new and original information in the Earth Sciences.  Conducted independently but with the general guidance of appropriate faculty.  CR/NC grading.  Repeatable course.

EAR 499   Senior Thesis (2).

Prerequisites: Approval of instructor.

Geological research and writing of a thesis. Generally includes library, field and laboratory investigations.  Topic of research to be approved and directed by an instructor.  CR/NC grading.

EAR 478   Engineering Geology (3).

Prerequisite:  EAR 386.

Evaluation and abatement of geologic hazards affecting construction projects and land use.  Landslides, groundwater pollution, subsidence, flooding, and earthquake effects. Mechanical properties of rocks and soils.  Case histories and site investigations. Application to business, law, construction engineering and environmental studies.
Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

 

HEA 100   Health and Lifestyles (3).

To familiarize the student with relationships among the physical, social and psychological aspects of health, which include:  self-care, prevention and analysis of personal health problems through participation in self-assessment techniques. Topics include the relationship of lifestyles to nutrition, stress, physical fitness, death and dying,
and mental illness. 

HEA 205   Introduction to Orthotics and Prosthetics (3).

Prerequisites:  BIO 250 and BIO 251, or consent of instructor.

Examination of the history and current state of O & P services.  Review of methods, materials, and biomechanics.  Overview of lower and upper limb prosthetics and orthotics, and spinal orthotics.  ADA and the meaning of disability.  Professional ethics, qualifications and certification.

HEA 231   Clinical Protocols in Orthotics and Prosthetics (3).

Prerequisite:  HEA 205. Co-requisite:  HEA 317

O&P evaluation and treatment concepts; history, diagnosis, prescription, physical examination, assessment, plan and education.  Overview of surface anatomy.  Causes of amputation, amputation surgery, and post-op protocols.  Patient-practitioner interaction and communication.  Introduction to taking impressions and model preparation.

HEA 250   Normal and Pathological Gait (1).

Prerequisite:  BIO 250 and BIO 251

Learn to recognize gait and postural deviations, determine cause and suggest mechanical remedies.  Students will evaluate patients and videotapes, review EMG and force plate recordings, compare results of surgery, therapy, and mechanical aids.  Fee required.

HEA 280   Orientation and Elementary Radiation Protection (1).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Orientation to applied medicine, hospitals and radiology departments.  Introduces students to overall view of radiology and ethical principles.  Basic radiation protection instruction to allow students to begin the clinical practicum. 

HEA 281   Medical Terminology: Radiology (1).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Programmed approach to general medical terminology with emphasis on radiology and applied specialties.  Review of common medical terms, prefixes, suffixes and roots. 

HEA 287   Clinical Practicum I (1).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Supervised Clinical rotations through support areas of radiology department: filerooms, darkrooms, patient transport
and scheduling.  Introduction to hospital environment and health care team. 
Film critiques.  Practicum 280 hours.

 

HEA 300   Health in Public Education (2).

Prerequisite:  HEA 100 or equivalent is recommended. 

Health education required course for the professional multiple or single-subject, clear credential teaching applicants.  Covers all topics designated in the Health Framework for California, including personal health, family health, nutrition, the physiological and sociological effects of substance abuse, cardiopulmonary resuscitation and child abuse.

HEA 312   Introduction to Public Health (3).

Prerequisite: HSC 492. 

Nature, transmission, and control of disease from a public health perspective:  Historical background, current problems, trends in prevention and control, and applications
to health care planning. Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. 

HEA 314   Health Behavior (3).

Current concepts of the behavioral sciences in the health field with specific application to ethnically and culturally diverse urban communities.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. 

HEA 315   Interpersonal Skills in Health Communication (3).

Fundamentals, principles, and skills of interpersonal and group processes in health related occupations.  Special emphasis on theory and techniques of interviewing, small group dynamics, crisis intervention and interpersonal management skills in ethnically and culturally diverse urban settings.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. 

HEA 317   Pathophysiology for Orthotics and Prosthetics (3).

Prerequisites:  HEA 205; Co-Requisite:  HEA 231.

A study of the etiology, clinical signs and symptoms, treatments, prognosis, and social implications of pathological conditions that affect the neurological, musculoskeletal, and vascular systems and that require orthotic/prosthetic intervention:  low back pain, scoliosis, spinal injury, arthritis, stroke, trauma, and diabetes. Fee required.

HEA 318   Health Resources               Management (3).

Prerequisite: HSC 201. 

Concepts, issues, and skills in administration and management of a health care unit, including personnel, finances, equipment, supplies, and facilities.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. 

HEA 321   Patient Assessment (3).

Prerequisite:  Admission into the Physician Assistant Option.

This course encompasses the skills and techniques necessary to gather a complete, appropriate history and physical examination.  Interviewing, communication and charting are included.  An overview of laboratory tests and radiologic procedures are also included.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. 

HEA 322   Principles of Therapeutics (3).

Prerequisite: Admission into the Physician Assistant Option. 

This course offers an overview of pharmacologic principles and an introduction to drugs and drug therapy.  Principles of nutrition, nutritional history and assessment are also taught as integral in diagnosis, treatment, and preventive medicine.

HEA 323   Primary Care (3).

Prerequisite:  Admission into the Physician Assistant Option.

This course forms the core of the primary care areas that includes obstetrics, gynecology, pediatrics, geriatrics, family medicine, health promotion and disease prevention.

HEA 324   Internal Medicine (4).

Prerequisite:  Admission into the Physician Assistant Option.

This course deals with adult, internal medicine which includes pulmonary medicine, cardiology, hepatobiliary medicine, genitourinary medicine, gastrointestinal medicine, rheumatology, hematology, onocology, endocrinology, sexually-transmitted disease, and dermatology. 

HEA 325   Surgery and Orthopedics (3).

Prerequisite:  Admission into the Physician Assistant Option.

This course outlines principles of surgery to prepare students for in-patient clinical experience and offers an introduction to orthopedics.

HEA 326   Medical Specialties (3).

Prerequisite:  Admission into the Physician Assistant Option.

This course includes ophthalmology, ear nose-throat, psychiatry, neurology, and emergency medicine and emphasizes diagnosis, assessment, initial management and stabilization of the patient.

HEA 327   History and Physical Examination Practica (3).

Prerequisite:  Admission into the Physician Assistant Option.

This is the clinical practice component of patient assessment. Students will combine HEA 321 with the supervised practice sessions to lay the foundation for clinical experiences.

HEA 335   Orthotic and Prosthetic Practice Management (2).

Prerequisites:  Admission to the Orthotics and Prosthetics Option.

Course will address practice management issues in the O&P office.  It includes ABC Canon of Ethics, professionalism, cultural diversity, patient interviews, medical documentation, rehabilitation team practices, HCFA billing system, letters of medical necessity, HMO contracts, O&P cost economics, and marketing.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. Fee required.

HEA 340   Lower Limb Orthotics I (3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor; admission to Orthotics/Prosthetics option.

Patient evaluation, prescription recommendation; orthoses measurement, fabrication and fitting.  Lower limb biomechanics, gait analysis, and motor disability.  Fabrication and fitting of several orthoses including arch support, UCBL foot orthoses, and ankle-foot orthoses (metal, plastic and patellar-tendon bearing).  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

HEA 342   Lower Limb Orthotics II(3).

Prerequisite:  HEA 340.

Continuation of HEA 340.  Patient evaluation, prescription recommendations, orthoses measurement, lower limb biomechanics, gait analysis, and motor disability.  Fabrication and fitting of several knee-ankle-foot orthoses.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week. 
Fee required.

HEA 344   Spinal Orthotics (3).

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

Admission to Orthotics/Prosthetics option. Patient evaluation, prescription recommendation, orthosis measurement, fabrication and fitting.  Spinal biomechanics and motor disability.  Fitting of several orthoses, including lumbo-sacral, thoraco-lumbo-sacral, and cervical types. Fabrication of at least five orthoses.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

HEA 350   Below Knee Prosthetics I (3).

Prerequisite:  HEA 250. 

Fabrication, fitting, and dynamic alignment of patellar-tendon bearing prostheses.  All fittings include test sockets, bench, static and dynamic alignments.  Four sockets completed using PTB and PTS designs.  Medical management, prescription considerations.  One completed below-knee prosthesis.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

HEA 352   Below Knee Prosthetics II (3).

Prerequisite:  HEA 350.

Fabrication, fitting, and dynamic alignment of patellar-tendon bearing prostheses.  All fittings include test sockets, bench, static and dynamic alignments.  Four sockets completed using PTB and PTS designs.  Medical management, prescription considerations.  One completed below-knee prosthesis.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

HEA 354   Above Knee Prosthetics I (3).

Prerequisite:  HEA 352.

Casting, measurement, transparent test socket fitting, bench, static and dynamic alignments, and methods for evaluation
of proper fit.  Fitting of two quadrilateral sockets including suction and pelvic suspension.  Demonstration of endoskeletal and exoskeletal above knee systems.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

HEA 355   Material Science and Applied Anatomy in Orthotics and Prosthetics (4).

Prerequisites:  HEA 205 and HEA 231.

Principles of stress, strain, Young's modulus.  Plastic and metal strength characteristics.  Polymer chemistry and mechanical properties of plastics.  Selection of appropriate orthotic/prosthetic materials and components based on mechanical goals.  Tissue interfaces.  Muscle and joint structure and function, and relationship to prosthetic and orthotic interventions.

HEA 371  Radiologic Technology Legal Perspectives  and Review (1).   

Prerequisite:  Admission to Radiologic Technology Option - CRT.

Explores the foundations of the radiologic technology profession from legal perspective and coordinates study of current issues, theories and techniques related to health care delivery; principles of dark room technology and radiation protection, and medical terminology.

HEA 372   Radiologic Technology Historical and Philosophical Perspective and Professional Review (1).  

Prerequisite:  Admission to Radiologic Technology Option - CRT.

Explores the foundations of the radiologic technology profession from historical and philosophical perspectives and coordinates study of current issues, theories and techniques related to concepts and practice of fundamental patient care, radiologic exposure and routine radiologic procedures. 

HEA 373   Radiologic Technology Ethical Perspectives and Professional Review (1). 

Prerequisite:  Admission to Radiologic Technology Option - CRT.

Explores the foundations of the radiologic technology profession from an ethical perspective and coordinates study of current issues, theories and techniques related to radiographic procedures using contrast media, topographic anatomy and positioning, and routine fluoroscopic procedures. 

HEA 374   Radiologic Technology Political and Social Perspectives and Professional Review (1). 

Prerequisite:  Admission to Radiologic Technology Option - CRT.

Explores the foundations of the radiologic technology profession from a political and social perspective and coordinates study of current issues, theories and techniques related to radiation protection and federal and state regulations, radiologic physics, topographic anatomy and positioning, and routine exams in pediatrics, surgery and genitourinary room.

HEA 375   Radiologic Technology Future Perspectives and Professional Review (1). 

Prerequisite:  Admission to Radiologic Technology Option - CRT.

Explores the future of the radiologic technology profession from a technological, as well as professional perspective and coordinates study of current issues, theories and techniques related to special radiologic procedures, sub-specialties, and departmental and administrative procedures, and senior research topics. 

HEA 380   Darkroom Chemistry and Techniques (1).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Darkroom construction, hand and automatic processing, film artifacts, processing aspects, and prevention.  Quality control and darkroom chemistry. 

HEA 381   Patient Care Procedures Related to Radiology (2).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Introduction to fundamental patient care procedures and principles in radiology departments: patient care/handling, body mechanics, aseptic technique, emergency procedures and use/care support equipment in preparation for patient contact. 

HEA 382   Principles of Radiographic Exposure (3).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Basic radiographic principles: image formation, intensifying screens, factors affecting quality, calibration, equipment design/function, filters, electromagnetic radiation and exposure factors.  Teaches mechanics of performing examinations. 

HEA 383   Common Radiographic Procedures Using Contrast Media (2).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Positioning and exposure techniques for contrast studies (esophograms, barium enemas, etc.) fluoroscopic techniques. Introduction to the uses, contraindications, and pharmacology of contrast media. 

HEA 384   Topographical Anatomy & Positioning I (3).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Introduces topographic anatomy and positioning procedures necessary to produce diagnostic radiographs of the entire body (except  the skull).  Exposure control techniques and exam indications. 

HEA 385   Radiation Protection (3).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Principles of radiation safety, biological effects, x-ray production, and radiation detection devices. Emphasis on federal and state regulations.

HEA 387   Clinical Practicum II (3).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Supervised rotations through routine diagnostic rooms.  Perform radiologic examinations on patients under direct supervision of a technologist.  These  will include x-rays and film critiques of the thoracic and appendicular skeleton.  Rotation through emergency rooms, orthopedics, and portable radiography.  Practicum 580 hours.

HEA 388   Clinical Practicum III (3).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Supervised rotation through routine radiographic/fluoroscopic rooms, including surgery.  Perform routine diagnostic examinations (except skull), fluoroscopic and intra-operative exams.  Weekend rotations begin.  Film critiques.  Practicum 580 hours.

HEA 395   Special Topics in Health Science (1-3).

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

Study of a topic of interest to students pursuing a career in the health professions.  Topic will vary as announced.  One to three hours of lecture per week.

HEA 401   Physician Assistant Historical and Philosophical Perspectives and Professional Review  (1).

Prerequisites:  Admission to the Physician Assistant Option; concurrent enrollment in HEA 321, HEA 322, HEA 323, and HEA 325.

One of four courses to promote currency and excellence in physician assistant practice.  Explores foundations of the PA profession from historical and philosophical perspectives and coordinates study of current issues, theories and techniques of patient assessment, principles of therapeutics, primary care, surgery and orthopedics.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. 

HEA 402   Physician Assistant Ethical Perspectives and Professional Review  (1).

Prerequisites:  Admission to the Physician Assistant Option; concurrent enrollment in HEA 324, HEA 326, HEA 327, and HEA 421.

The second of four courses to promote currency and excellence in physician assistant practice.  Explores foundations of the PA profession from an ethical perspective and coordinates study of current issues, theories and techniques of internal care, medical specialities, history and physical examination practica and advanced primary care I.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments.  

HEA 403   Physician Assistant Political Perspectives and Professional Review  (1).

Prerequisites:  Admission to the Physician Assistant Option; concurrent enrollment in HEA 420 and HEA 422.

The third of four courses to promote currency and excellence in physician assistant practice.  Explores foundations of the PA profession from a political perspective and coordinates study of current issues, theories and techniques related to concepts and practice of primary care medicine and advanced clinical primary care II.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. 

HEA 404   Physician Assistant Legal Perspectives andProfessional Review (1).

Prerequisites:  Admission to the Physician Assistant Option; concurrent enrollment in HEA 423 and HEA 424.

The fourth of four courses to promote currency and excellence in physician assistant practice.  Explores foundations of the PA profession from a legal perspective and coordinates study of current issues, theories and techniques related to advanced clinical primary care III, family medicine preceptorship and clinical selectives.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. 

HEA 420   Primary Care Medicine:  Current Concepts and Practice (2).

Prerequisites:  Admission into the Physician Assistant Option.

A presentation of selected cases encountered in primary care with emphasis on current thinking on evaluation and management for re-entry into the clinic. Integration of skills in:  history-taking, physical examination, laboratory techniques, pharmacology, prevention and patient education.

HEA 421   Advanced Clinical Primary Care I (4).

Prerequisites: Admission into the Physician Assistant Option.

Integration of didactic materials with practical patient care skills learned in clinical clerkship rotations 1 through 3, under clinical supervisors and augmented with reading assignments and small group study.

HEA 422   Advanced Clinical Primary Care II (8).

Prerequisites: Admission into the Physician Assistant Option.

Integration of didactic materials with practical patient care skills learned in clinical clerkship rotations 4 through 6, under clinical supervisors and augmented with reading assignments and small group study.

HEA 423   Advanced Clinical Primary Care III (4).

Prerequisites:  Admission into the Physician Assistant Option.

Integration of didactic materials with practical patient care  skills learned in clinical clerkship rotations 7 through 8, under clinical supervisors and augmented with reading assignments and  small group study.

HEA 424   Family Medicine Preceptorship and Clinical Selective (8).

Prerequisites:  Admission into the Physician Assistant Option.

A two-week intensive study of an elected subject area and an extended three-month family medicine clerkship.  Primary care curriculum is integrated in this course.

HEA 440   Upper Limb Orthotics (2).

Prerequisite:  HEA 242.

Evaluation, prescription recommendations, orthoses measurement, fabrication and fitting.  Anatomy, biomechanics, and motor disability of upper limb orthotics.  Special attention to deformity control, tissue protection, restored function. Fabrication and fitting of basic static hand and wrist-hand orthoses (including wrist-driven and external-power).  One hour of lecture and two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

HEA 442   Lower Limb Orthotics III (1-2).

Prerequisite:  HEA 342.

Advanced topics; ankle, knee and hip treatments related to Spina Bifida, Cerebral Palsey, brain injury, stroke, polio and other motor disabilities.  Lower limb biomechanics, gait analysis and material science.  Lectures on rotational control, tone reduction and specific application for children.  Fee required.

HEA 444   Spinal Orthotics II  (2).

Prerequisite:  HEA 344

Treatment of scoliosis, kyphosis and cervical spine fractures. Patient evaluation, prescription recommendation, hospital protocol, orthoses measurement, fabrication and fitting.  Spinal biomechanics and motor disability.  Fabrication and/or fitting of Boston type jacket, Milwaukee brace, Minerva and halo orthosis.  One of hour of lecture and 2 hours of activity per week. Fee required.

HEA 450   Upper Limb Prosthetics (3).

Prerequisite:  HEA 354.

Prescription, casting, measurement, fabrication, alignment, harnessing and methods for evaluation of proper fit.  Principles of shoulder disarticulation prostheses.  Demonstration of myoelectric powered systems including identification of electrode sites, trouble-shooting, and prosthetic maintenance. Complete two below- and one above-elbow prostheses.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

HEA 452   Above Knee Prosthetics II (3).

Prerequisite:  HEA 354.

Continuation of HEA 354.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

HEA 460   Community Health Agencies (3).

Prerequisite:  HSC 201.

Examination and evaluation of state, federal, local and community health agencies and programs.  Survey and analyze community level drug, alcohol, communicable disease, and mental health problems and programs.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. 

HEA 466   Environmental Health Problems (3).

Prerequisite: HSC 201.

Impact of human activities on environmental quality and resulting environmental health problems, especially local issues, public and private responses to them.  Design, carry out, and analyze a study and prepare a written report of results.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. 

HEA 468  Multicultural Health (3).

Prerequisite:  HEA 100 or equivalent.  SOC 101 and ANT 100 are recommended.

Study of social, cultural, psychological, and biological factors affecting the distribution of health, wellness, and illness in various ethnic, cultural, and racial groups.  Special attention is given to health issues of groups with special physical and mental health needs, including underserved and immigrant populations residing in California.  Graded A-C/NC. 

HEA 470   Legal Issues in the Health Sciences (3).

Prerequisite: HSC 201.  

Examination of new legislation, exploration of various health law issues that impact hospitals, individuals and groups within the health care sector; including informed consent, regulation/antitrust, licensure and credentialing, and medical ethics.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. 

HEA 472   Survey of Health Care Finance (3).

Prerequisite: HSC 201.

Concepts and issues in financial management of health care organizations.  Use of tools for cost effective decision-making and learn to recognize and deal with financial components of decision-making in health care organizations.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments. 

HEA 474  Seminar in Health Care Ethics (3). 

Prerequisites:  HSC 201;  HEA 470 and HEA 472 are recommended.

Intensive study of ethical issues raised in provision of health care and health care administration.  Current and historical arguments surrounding ethical issues will be discussed and analyzed.  Students will learn to recognize ethical dilemmas, apply ethical principles and resolve the dilemmas. 

HEA 480   Radiological Physics (2).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Emphasis of health and safety on electric circuits, generators, x-ray circuits, x-ray physics. 

HEA 481   Topographic Anatomy and Positioning II (3).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Introduces topographic anatomy and positioning procedures necessary to produce diagnostic radiographs of the skull.  Exposure control techniques and exam indications included. 

HEA 482   Special Radiographic Procedures (2).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option or consent of instructor.

Radiographic anatomy and physiology, positioning, film evaluation and specialized equipment applying to highly technical exams (interventional radiography, tomography, CT and MRI).  Management
of acutely ill patients.  Fee required.

HEA 483   Sub-Specialties in Radiology (2).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Introduction to principles of pediatric radiography, intraoral radiography, radiation therapy and nuclear medicine.  Image formation, equipment, techniques and handling of radiation and radionucleotides. 

HEA 485   Departmental Administrative and Office Procedures, Computer Literacy (1).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Introduction to organization and budgeting of a radiology department; use of computers in radiology and basic computer principles. 

HEA 487   Clinical Practicum IV (1).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Supervised rotations through routine radiographic/fluoroscopic, pediatric, surgical and genitourinary rooms.  Performs routine exams and film critiques (except skull) in all areas.  Practicum 280 hours.

HEA 488   Clinical Practicum V (3).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Supervised rotations through all areas of routine radiography, with student performing all routine diagnostic fluoroscopic and radiographic exams and film critiques, including skull radiography.  Student will
be able to perform radiologic procedures independently.  Practicum 580 hours.

HEA 489   Clinical Practicum VI (3).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Supervised rotations through special radiographic procedures, radiation therapy, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine, mammography and ultrasound.  Continued application in routine radiography, fluoroscopy and film critique.  Perform radiologic procedures independently.  Practicum 580 hours.

HEA 490   Health Science Senior Seminar (1-3).

Prerequisites: Completion of Health Science core and two option courses;  HSC 201, HSC 492, HEA 312, HEA 314, HEA 315 and HSC 308 or HEA 317 and HEA 318.

Undertake an in-depth study employing techniques and principles used in the Health Science core and option. Designed for the Health Care Management and Community Health Options.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments.  One to three hours of seminar per week.

HEA 492   Research and Seminar in Orthotics and Prosthetics (2).

Prerequisite:  MAT 131, or consent of instructor.

Overview of the principles and applications of research.  Examination of testing and improving patient outcomes.  Basic concepts in research design, including literature review, identification of research question, development of data collection instruments, data analysis.  Write and present a research proposal.

HEA 493   Preceptorship in Orthotics and Prosthetics (2).

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

125 hour placement in a private sector or institutional facility.  Repeatable for credit up to 8 units.  Fee required.

HEA 499   Senior Research Project in Radiology (1,1).

Prerequisite:  Admission to the Radiologic Technology Option.

Individual research in radiology with student class presentation: learn presentation skills, use of A-V methods, oral skills, and written presentation.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments.  One hour of seminar activity per week.  Repeatable for credit for up to one unit.

HEA 240   Lower Limb Biomechanics and Kinesiology (3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor; admission
to Orthotics/Prosthetics Option.

Neuromusculoskeletal systems of the lower limb (above- and below-knee). For both normal function and in the presence of pathology.  Kinesiology of specific weaknesses and deformities will be studied.  Potential for orthotic and prosthetic management will be evaluated. Fee required.

HEA 242   Upper Limb Biomechanics and Kinesiology (2).

Prerequisite:  HEA 240.

Neuromusculoskeletal systems of the spine and upper limb:  both normal function and pathology. Specific weaknesses and deformities will be studied. Significance of upper limb pathology for orthotic/prosthetic design and management.
Fee required.

HEA 252   Material Science for Orthotics and Prosthetics (2).

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

Principles of stress, strain, Young’s Modulus.  Plastic/metal choices.  Preferred metal alloys, heat treatment, plastic polymer.  Polymer chemistry and mechanical properties of plastics.  Material designators, relationship of alloys to material properties.  Selection of most appropriate orthotic/prosthetic materials.  Fee required.

HEA 491   Research and Seminar in Orthotics and Prosthetics I (1).

Prerequisites:  HEA 440 and HEA 450.

Background literature review, hypothesis formation, study design, development of data collection instruments and data collection as phase one of orthotic/prosthetic research project.  Students must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by successfully completing oral and written assignments.  One hour of seminar per week. Fee required.

HSC 201  Health Care Systems and Perspectives (3).

Examination of healthcare delivery systems and personal health as integrated physiological, social, psychological processes.  Topics include role of healthcare providers; major healthcare organizations; contemporary healthcare issues; interactions of healthcare and physical environmental changes which influence health of the whole person. 

HSC 308  Pathophysiology for Health Professions (3).

Prerequisite:  BIO 250 and either BIO 251, CHE 112, or equivalent.

Principles of clinical pathophysiology, including assessment of clinical data necessary for identifying the causes of diseases and evaluating the underlying mechanisms of pathologic processes.  Discussion of immune disorders, inflammation, neoplasia and genetic disorders.  Review of the individual organ system and associated pathology.  Case studies, written/and or oral reports. 

HSC 491  Management Skills in the Health Sciences (3).

Prerequisite:  HSC 201

Presentation and discussion of current concepts and trends in the administration and management of the health sciences.  Educational/instructional methodologies.  Student projects, written and oral. 

HSC 492  Research Methods in Health Sciences (3).

Prerequisite:  MAT 131 is required; CSC 101 is recommended.

Overview of research methods in health sciences, including study design, sampling, data collection and analysis, statistical techniques, and report writing.  Application of research methods to development of research proposal.  Critical analysis of literature.  Examination of relevance of data to decision making. 

HSC 494  Independent Study in Health Sciences (1-3).

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

In-depth study of a health sciences topic under the supervision of a health sciences instructor.  Requires independent study contract to be completed before enrollment.  Repeatable course.

HSC 495  Special Topics in Health Sciences (1-3).

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

Intensive study of a Health Sciences topic of special interest to students pursuing a career in the health professions.  Topic will vary as announced.  One to three hours of lecture per week.

HSC 496  Internship in Health Sciences (1-6).

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

Students will be directed to health care facilities to serve as interns.  Regular meetings are scheduled with a faculty internship supervisor to assess student progress.  Up to forty hours per week.

HCS 498  Directed Research in Health Sciences (1-3).

Prerequisites:  HSC 201 and HSC 308 or HEA 317.

Advanced topics and research on specific subjects in Health Sciences.  Topics of research to be approved and directed by an instructor.

HSC 500  Health Care Leadership and Management  (3). 

Examines the structure, management and interrelationship of health care organizations across the spectrum of care in light of classical and contemporary management theory, and provides understanding of the unique relationship within and between health care organizations and professionals.

HSC 501  Advanced Research Methods in Health Science (3).

Prerequisites:  HSC 492 or equivalent and MAT 131 or equivalent.

Theory and practice of experimental, correlation and descriptive research.  Computer application of statistical packages to data sets.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week.

HSC 502  Principles of Epidemiology (3).

Overview of principles and methods of epidemiology and application to distribution of health and illness in society.  Examines risk factors associated with incidence and prevalence of acute and chronic diseases in diverse populations.

HSC 503  Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (3).

Study of health behaviors and evaluation of community intervention strategies for the promotion of health and prevention of disease in diverse populations.

HSC 504  Health Policy and Administration for Health Professionals (3).

Examination of current health policy issues and health care administrative practices for health professionals.  Emphasis on health care reform, managed care, case management, personnel management, financial management, the health care team, Patient Focused Care, Continuous Quality Improvement.

HSC 505  Teaching Strategies for Health Professionals (3).

Prerequisite:  HSC 500.

Study of effective teaching and evaluation methods in health sciences, including principles of teaching and learning, curriculum development, problem-based learning, competency-based outcomes assessment, group dynamics, and instructional media.

HSC 506  Critical Assessment of Health Science Literature (3).

Prerequisites:  HSC 501, or completion of HSC 492 or equivalent and MAT 131 or equivalent, and consent of instructor.

Critical assessment of health literature in terms of research methods, application of research findings, and policy implications.

HSC 507 Measurement and Assessment in Health Professions Education (3).

Prerequisite:  HSC 500

The course focuses on issues of measurement and assessment in teaching in the health professions.  Emphasis is placed on approaches to testing, types of instruments, validity, reliability, and item analysis.  Examines methods and approaches to evaluation of scientific research.

HSC 508 Ethical Issues in Health Care Management (3).

Prerequisite:  HSC 500 is recommended.

Review of ethical decision-making theories and moral principles related to health care organizational management, biomedical advances, end-of-life criteria, access to care, and the establishment, composition, and responsibilities of medical ethics committees and ethical codes of conduct.

 

HSC 509  Communication and Group Dynamics in Healthcare (3).

Prerequisite:  HSC 500 is recommended

Assists students in understanding and improving interpersonal communication skills through structured exercises in professional presentations, scientific writing, skill development in health information technologies, and interacting with health personnel and practitioners in healthcare organizations.

HSC 510  Orientation to Emergency Medicine (2).

Prerequisites:  HSC 501, HSC 502 and HSC 503.

Survey of advanced techniques and procedures required for specialty training in emergency medicine.

HSC 511  Advanced Clinical Studies:  Emergency Medicine Residency (8).

Prerequisite:  HSC 510.

Supervised advanced training in emergency medicine in clinical management, technical and procedural skills, interpretation of diagnostic data, patient education, collegial teaching, and interpersonal communication with multicultural populations.  Rotations in specialty throughout clinical year.  Course can be repeated twice for credit.

HSC 512 Principles of Managed Care  (3).

Prerequisite:  HSC 500

Analyzes the implications to providers, consumers, and payers of managed care including the financial and operational values of capitation and other reimbursement mechanisms, medical group formation and valuation, risk assessment, and contractual issues of price, service, and payment.

HSC 513  Orientation to Cardiac Medicine and Surgery (2).

Prerequisites:  HSC 501, HSC 502 and HSC 503.

Survey of advanced techniques and procedures required for specialty training
in cardiac medicine and surgery.

HSC 514  Advanced Clinical Studies:  Cardiac Medicine and Surgery Residency (8).

Prerequisite:  HSC 513.

Supervised advanced training in cardiac medicine and surgery in clinical management, technical and procedural skills, interpretation of diagnostic data, patient education, collegial teaching, and interpersonal communication with multicultural populations.  Rotations in specialty throughout clinical year.  Course can be repeated twice for credit.

HSC 515 Organizational Theory and Behavior in Health Sciences (3).

Prerequisite:  HSC 500; completion of core requirements is recommended.

Reviews organizational design, behavior and theory as an interdisciplinary approach to understanding health service organizations.  Issues of workforce diversity, organizational development, reengingeering and the use of teams to improve efficiency are analyzed.

HSC 516  Orientation to Gerontology (2).

Prerequisites:  HSC 501, HSC 502 and HSC 503.

Survey of advanced techniques and procedures required for specialty training in gerontology.

HSC 517  Advanced Clinical Studies:  Gerontology Residency (8).

Prerequisite:  HSC 516.

Supervised advanced training in gerontology in clinical management, technical and procedural skills, interpretation of diagnostic data, patient education, collegial teaching, and interpersonal communication with multicultural populations.  Rotations in specialty throughout clinical year.  Course can be repeated twice for credit.

HSC 518 Finance and Cost Accounting (3).

Prerequisite:  HSC 500

Presents principles and perspectives of financial and cost management of profit and not-for-profit health care organizations with specific emphasis on the integration of contractual allowance, capitation management, cost-center accounting and reimbursement policy impact on financial management.

HSC 519  Orientation to Surgery (2).

Prerequisites:  HSC 501, HSC 502 and HSC 503.

Survey of advanced techniques and procedures required for specialty training in surgery.

HSC 520  Advanced Clinical Studies:  Surgery Residency (8).

Prerequisite:  HSC 519.

Supervised advanced training in surgery in clinical management, technical and procedural skills, interpretation of diagnostic data, patient education, collegial teaching, and interpersonal communication with multicultural populations.  Rotations in specialty throughout clinical year.  Course can be repeated twice for credit.

HSC 521 Compliance, Health Law and Research (3).

Prerequisite:  HSC 500

Covers legal theories, issues, and government regulations as they pertain to management of and compliance with recognized standards of medical research and clinical trials.

HSC 522  Orientation to Pediatrics (2).

Prerequisites:  HSC 501, HSC 502 and HSC 503.

Survey of advanced techniques and procedures required for specialty training in pediatrics.

HSC 523  Advanced Clinical Studies:  Pediatric Residency (8).

Prerequisite:  HSC 522.

Supervised advanced training in pediatrics in the areas of clinical management, technical and procedural skills, interpretation of diagnostic data, patient education, collegial teaching, and interpersonal communication with multicultural populations.  Rotations in specialty throughout clinical year.  Course can be repeated twice for credit.

HSC 524 Health Science Research and Funded Projects (3).

Prerequisite:  HSC 500

Analysis of funded research projects in the health sciences, including study design, sampling, data analysis and significance of the research proposal in preparing a grant application.  Critical analysis of the literature and identification of appropriate funding opportunities for grant projects.

HSC 525  Orientation to Neonatology (2).

Prerequisites:  HSC 501, HSC 502 and HSC 503.

Survey of advanced techniques and procedures required for specialty training in neonatology.

HSC 526  Advanced Clinical Studies:  Neonatology Residency (8).

Prerequisite:  HSC 525.

Supervised advanced training in neonatology in clinical management, technical and procedural skills, interpretation of diagnostic data, patient education, collegial teaching, and interpersonal communication with multicultural populations.  Rotations in specialty throughout clinical year.  Course can be repeated twice for credit.

HSC 528  Orientation to Internal Medicine (2).

Prerequisites:  HSC 501, HSC 502 and HSC 503.

Survey of advanced techniques and procedures required for specialty training in internal medicine.

HSC 529  Advanced Clinical Studies:  Internal Medicine Residency (8).

Prerequisite:  HSC 528.

Supervised advanced training in internal medicine in clinical management, technical and procedural skills, interpretation of diagnostic data, patient education, collegial teaching, and interpersonal communication with multicultural populations.  Rotations in specialty throughout clinical year.  Course can be repeated twice for credit.

HSC 530 Health Care Strategic Planning and Marketing (3).

Prerequisite:  HSC 500

Presents the principles and theoretical foundation of health care strategic and tactical planning, marketing, business development,  managed care contract maximization, and financial analysis and modeling of alternative short and long-range strategies across the continuum of health care.

HSC 531  Orientation to Family Medicine (2).

Prerequisites:  HSC 501, HSC 502 and HSC 503.

Survey of advanced techniques and procedures required for specialty training in family medicine.

HSC 532  Advanced Clinical Studies:  Family Medicine Residency (8).

Prerequisite:  HSC 531.

Supervised advanced training in family medicine in clinical management, technical and procedural skills, interpretation of diagnostic data, patient education, collegial teaching, and interpersonal communication with multicultural populations.  Rotations in specialty throughout clinical year.  Course can be repeated twice for credit.

HSC 594  Independent Study (1-3).

Independent study, including research or field experience under supervision of a faculty member.  Independent study contract required.  Repeatable course.

HSC 595  Special Topics (1-3).

Advanced course of interest to graduate students in the health sciences.  Specific topic and content will vary as announced.  Repeatable course.

HSC 596  Practicum in Professional Studies (3).

Prerequisite:  Completion of core courses.

Fieldwork and in-depth study of a discipline related topic under the direction of Division of Health Sciences faculty member. Graded CR/NC only. Nine hours of laboratory per week.  Repeatable for credit for up to a maximum of six units. 

HSC 598  Directed Research (1).

Research on a subject related to the option which is suitable for professional presentation or publication.  Specific topic of the research must be approved and directed by an instructor.  A maximum of 2 units may be applied toward the master's degree.  Repeatable course.

HSC 599  Graduate Capstone Activity (1).

Prerequisites:  Advancement to Candidacy and completion of all core courses and HEA 598.

Writing and presentation of a research project under supervision with assigned faculty.

HSC 600  Project Continuation Course (0).

Students who have completed all coursework except HSC 599 Graduate Capstone Activity may maintain continuous attendance by enrolling in this course.  Signature of graduate coordinator is required.

 

HIS 100    Perspectives on the Present (3).

Exploration of the ways in which history and historians provide perspective and background analysis of current issues.  Focus on case studies, such as: the civil rights movement; the family in history; cycles of economic depression; colonial independence movements; origins of modern science. 

HIS 101    History of the United States (3).

A study of the ideals, creeds, institutions, and behavior of the peoples of the United States.  Meets the State requirement in U.S. History.

HIS 120    World Civilizations I (3).

The rise and development of key world civilizations from ancient times to 1500.  Emphasis upon ideas, cultures, individuals and institutions that are part of the world's heritage.

HIS 121   World Civilizations II (3).

Contacts and conflicts among peoples and nations of the world from 1500 to the present.  Emphasis upon ideas, movements, individuals and institutions that have shaped the modern world.

 

HIS 300    Research and Writing Skills (3).

Prerequisites: Freshman level writing courses.

Critical skills for historical  research and writing, including the use of library resources, reading and reviewing techniques, interpreting documents and evaluating evidence, and methods for effective classroom presentations and research papers. 

HIS 301    Individual, Family, and Community in Historic Perspective (3).

Concentrates upon factors that contribute to shaping of individual, family, community, and regional history. Emphasis upon personal histories and individual relationships to immediate environment.  Includes ethnic settlements, historic sites, oral histories, generations. 

HIS 302    Practicum in Applied History (3)

Prerequisite:  HIS 300 or consent of instructor.

Community based historical investigation, including oral history, family history, and institutional history.  Students work with community groups, agencies or institutions and consult weekly with a faculty supervisor.   Total of 120 hours of activity.

HIS 304    Theory and Practice of History (3).

Prerequisite:  HIS 300 is recommended.

An examination of the works and theories of the great historians, exploration of the major philosophies of history and review of the current trends of the field of history.

HIS 305    World History for Teachers  (3).

Topics in world history as taught in grades 6, 7 and 10 in California schools.  Thematic approaches using topical and case study methods and emphasizing primary source materials for teaching.

HIS 310    The Ancient World (3).

The survey of the history of the ancient world with emphasis on the earliest civilizations of the Near East, classical Greece, and the rise and fall of the Roman Empire. 

HIS 311    Early Middle Ages (3).

Europe from the decline of the ancient Mediterranean civilization of Rome to the mid-eleventh  century; political, economic, institutional, and cultural changes and developments. 

HIS 312    The High Middle Ages (3) EOY.

Europe from the mid-eleventh century to the fourteenth century; emphasis on the fortunes of Empire and Papacy, the renaissance of the twelfth century, economic and institutional developments. 

HIS 313    Renaissance and Reformation (3).

The Italian Renaissance through the Thirty Years’ War; the rise of national states, the Protestant revolt, the Counter-Reformation, the hegemony of Spain, and the attendant commercial revolution of the Atlantic World. 

HIS 314    Emergence of Modern Europe (3).

The dissolution of traditional societies in Europe and the emergence of modern ideology, from the Enlightenment through the French and Industrial revolutions to the period of internal strife and power politics at the end of the 19th century. 

HIS 315    Twentieth Century Europe               (3).

The formation of present-day Europe amid continued industrialization, war, social  and political ferment from the opening of the century to the present. 

HIS 316    Tudor-Stuart England (3).

England clears path to world power.  From the Tudors through mid-Eighteenth century.  Reformation, Civil War, Revolution.  Agricultural and Commercial revolution, Classical Age of the Constitution.  Main focus on eras of Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, and the Civil War. 

HIS 318    Russia Under the Tsars (3).

A survey of the Russian people, culture and historical developments, from Medieval Muscovy to the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917.  Topics of emphasis: Ivan the Terrible, age of Peter the Great, development of Russian religion, rise of Russian communism, fall of the monarchy, Russian literature. 

HIS 319    Twentieth Century Russia (3).

A survey of the Russian people and Soviet society from the rise of communism to the present.  Topics of emphasis: Russian Revolution, development of communism, Stalinism, foreign policy, literature and the arts, socialist economic structure. 

HIS 330    United States: Colonial Period (3).

The discovery, founding and expansion of colonial settlements to 1740.  The relation of European institutions and plans to American ideas, experience, and reality. 

HIS 331    United States: Revolutionary and Constitutional Period (3).

Evolution of the revolutionary movement in the North American colonies.  Anglo-American imperial problems, culminating in the Confederation period and the drafting of the American Constitution, 1740 to 1789.

HIS 332    United States: Early National Period (3).

A study of the national experience from the Constitution through the era of sectional conflict.  Includes expansion of the Union westward, the emergence of a national character, and sectional rivalries leading
to conflict at mid-century. 

HIS 333    United States: Civil War and Reconstruction (3).

Social, political, and economic origins of sectionalism and breakup of the Union; military campaigns and the home front in wartime; reconstruction in the South.  Focus on the years 1849-1877 and their legacy to later generations. 

HIS 334    Emergence of Modern America (3).

The triumph of the industrial revolution in the post-Civil War period and the response of agrarian and progressive protest.  The rise of the  United States to world power and involvement in international affairs prior to World War I. 

HIS 335    United States: War and Depression (3).

Major developments in American life and institutions from the beginning of World War I to the end of World War II.  Consideration of the social, economic, and political implications of prosperity, depression, and two world wars. 

HIS 336    United States: Recent Period (3).

Major developments in American life and institutions since World War II. Consideration of domestic politics from Truman to Reagan, effects of mass technology, the civil rights struggle, and confrontations with the communist world. 

HIS 340    The American Frontier (3).

Evaluation of successive American wests from colonial times and their reciprocal impact upon American society; the frontier hypothesis in historiography and its extension to comparative frontiers in other lands. 

HIS 341    California (3).

The social, political, and cultural history of California, from the period of Spanish exploration to the present; emphasis on adjustments of differing ethnic groups.

HIS 342    History of Los Angeles (3).

Los Angeles history from its beginnings to the present, including historical development of cities and towns in greater L.A.  Topics include ethnic contributions, industrial and commercial development, labor movement, transportation, natural resources, and architectural development. 

HIS 343    The Afro-American from Africa Through Reconstruction (3).

Consideration of the impact of general historical development upon Black Americans and their significance in American history, with attention to political, economic, legal, social, and cultural aspects; includes study of the institution of slavery and the struggle for freedom. 

HIS 344    The Afro-American from Reconstruction to the Present  (3).

Impact of general historical development upon Black Americans and their significance in United States history, with attention to political, economic, legal, social, and cultural aspects.  Study of race relations and the circumstances and aspirations of the Black American in an industrial age.

HIS 345    History of the Mexican American People I (3).

Mexican American life to 1900, stressing the evolution of economic and political thought, social institutions, and cultural expressions. 

HIS 346    History of the Mexican American People II (3).

The Mexican American’s contributions to the building of the Southwest; the clash between Mexicans and North Americans; the  emergence of the urban Mexican American. 

HIS 348    Labor in American Society (3).

The role of labor in the political, economic, and social life of the U.S., including growth of organized labor, rival ideologies, legal decisions, and contributions of various ethnic groups, from the colonial period to the present. 

HIS  349   History of Urban America (3).

Historical urban processes from colonial times to the present; emergence of heterogeneous, fragmented cities; causes of urbanization, character of urban life; and the consequences  of immigration and industrialization; includes urban physical development and architecture. 

HIS 351    History of American Law (3).

Examination of the origins and development of the American legal system and one or more areas of law-contracts, torts, family law, personal rights, etc.

HIS 352    Topics in the History of U.S. Foreign Relations (3).

Foreign policy by topics or eras.  Examples: U.S. Revolutionary period, U.S. policy in Asia, the Cold War era, the U.S. and the Third World in the twentieth century.  Topics will vary and be listed in the class schedule. 

HIS 354 American Immigration (3).

Historical trends, movements, and patterns of global immigration to the United States.  Topics of study include:  motives for immigration; anti-immigration sentiments and activities; legal and political responses; role of distinctive cultural groups; assimilation and nonconformity.

HIS 360    Africa: Pre-colonial Period (3).

An analysis designed to develop the students’ interpretive understanding of the historical and political developments in African societies; concentration on the tribal foundations of African civilizations.

HIS 361    Africa: Colonialism to Independence (3).

Social, economic, and political development in 19th and 20th century Africa, emphasizing religious revivals in Central and Western Sudan, impact of European imperialism on traditional institutions, colonialism and nationalism, regaining political independence in the 1960's. 

HIS 362    Traditional China (3).

The origins and evolution of Chinese civilization and the influence of China on East Asia prior to the 19th century Western impact. 

HIS 363    Modern China (3).

China from 1840 to the present. Western impact on traditional China and the Chinese response. Analysis of attempts to modernize China.  A history of the Chinese communist movement since 1921.  Society, politics and culture of the People’s Republic of China focusing on the era of Mao Zedong (1949-1976). 

HIS 364    Traditional Japan (3).

Origins and evolution of Japanese social, cultural, intellectual, and political traditions until the 19th Century Western impact.  Foundation for comparison and contrast of Japan before and after the Meiji Restoration. 

HIS 365    Modern Japan (3).

Japan from the late Tokugawa period to the  present.  Western impact on traditional Japan and the Japanese response; the development of a modern state, economy, and society. 

HIS 366    Latin America:  Colonial Period (3).

Colonial Latin America from pre-Columbian civilizations to the wars of independence, emphasizing mechanisms of empire established by the Spanish and Portuguese and acculturation between conquering Europeans and colonized Indian and African peoples. 

HIS 367    Latin America: National Period (3).

Latin America from the wars of independence to the present, with topical emphasis on the historical roots of underdevelopment, class conflict, and attempts by revolutionary and conservative movements to resolve political instability and economic dependency. 

HIS 368    Mexico: Colonial Period (3).

The history of the pre-Columbian civilizations, including the Mayas and Aztecs, the Spanish conquest, and the development of colonial society and institutions that led to the movement for independence. 

HIS 369    Mexico: National Period (3).

The development of Mexico since independence with emphasis on the evolution of its political, economic, and social institutions. 

HIS 376    Film as History (3).

The historical analysis of films as manuscripts and source materials for social and intellectual thought in the twentieth century.  Emphasis to vary from semester to semester, for example: Film as History: The Great Depression; or Film as History: Latin America. 

HIS 379    The Family in History (3).

Family relationships, sexual attitudes, patterns of growing up and growing old in various societies, and minority groups, as they have evolved with social and economic changes in various historical contexts. 

HIS 380    Women in History (3).

Changing role of women in the family, political economy and culture of various societies.  Topics vary, for example, Women in History:  Sex Roles in North and South America; Women in History:  Women in China; Women in History: Sex roles and Feminism in the United States. 

HIS 381    Across the Pacific: Asian and Pacific Peoples and  the Americas (3).

A survey history of Asian and Pacific contacts with North, Central and South America and the Pacific Basin, including immigration and acculturation, diplomatic and commercial relations, legal and political issues, and cross-cultural contributions. 

HIS 395    Special Topics in History (3). 

Intensive study of a single period, area, figure, movement, or idea in history.  Topic may be either departmental or interdisciplinary, but focus is historical, and may be single instructor or team taught. Example: Special Topics: Revolution. 

HIS 490    Senior Seminar in History (3). 

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor is required.

History majors and minors must have completed HIS 300.  Others should have completed writing proficiency requirement. Collective examination of a topic in depth.  Students will undertake a major research project utilizing historical skills.  Three hours of seminar per week.

HIS 494    Independent Study (1-3).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required.

Independent study of a particular problem under the direction of a faculty member of the  History Department.

HIS 317    Modern England (3).

England achieves world power. From mid-18th century to the present.  Industrial Revolution, achievement of democracy and the welfare state, the impact of war, and changing world role. 

HIS 373    The City in History  (3).

The rise of the city from earliest times to the present tracing the establishment and growth of cities as institutions and the development of the process of urbanization; comparison of selected cities. 

HIS 430    Oral History (3). 

Theory, principles and practices of oral history, including research preparation, interviewing techniques, transcription practices, preparation for public use, conservation and mechanical techniques.  Individual or group project included. 

HUS 300   Introduction to Human Services (3).

Introduction to human services as a profession.  Exploration of social forces that contribute to human needs, issues and problems related to planning, delivering and evaluating programs.  Some site visits are required. 

HUS 396   Practicum in Human Services (3-6).

Prerequisite: HUS 300.  May not be taken concurrently with any other field course.

Supervised field experience, with an emphasis on human services and educational settings.  Supervision emphasizes training and application of clinical, interviewing, and other helping skills, didactic methods, group techniques, methods of evaluation and/or other skills specific to fieldwork needs.

HUS 400   Case Management in Human Service Agencies (3).

Prerequisite:  HUS 300.

Models of institutional service delivery and case management systems.  Principles of and critical issues in case management, including collaborative and interagency services. 

HUS 496   Internship in Human Services (3-6).

Prerequisites:  HUS 396 Or PSY 396.  May not be taken concurrently with any other fieldwork course.

Survey of professional and ethical issues in the helping professions.  Supervised internships in human services settings.

 

HUM 200  Introduction to the Humanities (3).

Prerequisite: One semester of ENG 111 or six units of IDS 107 or equivalent. 

Examines the interrelationships among the humanities (art, literature, music, and philosophy) in Western culture by studying the theme of tradition and change in two periods, the Renaissance and the 20th Century (including the Harlem Renaissance). 

HUM 310  Key Concepts (3).

Prerequisite:  HUM 200 or equivalent.

Analysis of a major concept in humanistic thought and expression, e.g. the individual and society, success and values in the U.S., death and dying, war and society, etc.  Repeatable with different topics for credit. 

HUM 312  Key Movements (3).

Prerequisite:  HUM 200 or equivalent.

Analysis of a major historical movement from a humanistic perspective, e.g. Harlem Renaissance, Modernism, the Jazz Age, African Literature and Culture, etc.  Repeatable with different topics for credit. 

HUM 314  Key Issues (3).

Prerequisite:  HUM 200 or equivalent. 

Analysis of major contemporary issues from a humanities perspective. Examples include the role of the arts in society, literature and the rights of women, romantic love, visions of Los Angeles, etc. Repeatable with different topics for credit. 

HUM 490  Seminar in Humanities (3).

Prerequisites: Completion of 9 units selected from 300 and 400 level Humanities courses.

A multidisciplinary synthesis emphasizing cultural, historical, or aesthetic-perceptual insights in the humanities.  Topics vary.  Three hours of seminar per week.

HUM 500 Proseminar:  The Humanities in the City (3).

An introduction to graduate level study in the humanities using the theme of "the humanities in the city."  Three hours of seminar per week.

HUM 512  Texts and Language (3).

Examination of contemporary issues addressing what we read, how we read, and why we read.  Examples from literature and philosophy.  Includes the refining of skills in research and writing.  Three hours of seminar per week.

HUM 520  Seminar in Art (3).

Prerequisites: Courses in art history and appreciation are recommended.

An in-depth study of such subjects as a single artist, a period, or a movement or theme in art history.  Student should have a sufficient background in art vocabulary and concepts to participate.  Three hours of seminar per week.

HUM 522  Seminar in Literature  (3).

Prerequisites: Courses in literary interpretation and history are recommended.

Advanced work in a variety of topics in literature; assumes a working knowledge of the basic concepts and vocabulary of the discipline.  Three hours of seminar per week.

HUM 523  Seminar in Music (3).

Prerequisites:  Courses in music history, theory, and appreciation are recommended.

Advanced work in a variety of topics including study of a period, a cluster of composers, a movement, or music of a single country.  Three hours of seminar per week.

HUM 524  Seminar in Philosophy/Religious Studies (3).

Prerequisites:  Previous courses in philosophy are recommended.

Offers advanced work in a variety of topics such as the work of individual philosophers, or specific problems of epistemology or metaphysics.  Assumes working knowledge of the basic vocabulary and concepts of the discipline.  Three hours of seminar per week.

HUM 528  Images and Artifacts (3).

Examination of art, artifacts, architecture, murals, masks and other objects that are carriers of social, cultural, and aesthetic values.  Three hours of seminar per week.

HUM 540  Seminar in History (3).

Prerequisites:  Previous courses in history are recommended.

The study of a period or theme in history through the lens of the humanities.  Assumes a working knowledge of the basic concepts and vocabulary of the discipline.  Three hours of seminar per week.

HUM 582  Performance and Criticism (3).

A systematic examination of the theory, practice, and aesthetics of formal and informal criticism applied to performances in music, theatre, dance, and art films. 

HUM 594  Independent Study (3).

Prerequisites:  Previous courses in the humanities are required.

A special project involving research or creative work. Also extensive reading in consultation with a faculty member.  Repeatable course. 

HUM 599  Final Project (3).

Prerequisites:  Advancement to candidacy and consent of program coordinator.

Thesis or creative project related to the student’s particular combination of humanities studies.  If creative project, extensive prior preparation required.

HUM 600  Graduate Continuation Course (0). 

Graduate students who have completed their course work but not their thesis, project, or comprehensive examination, or who have other requirements remaining for the completion of their degree, must maintain continuous attendance by enrolling in this course.  Signature of graduate program coordinator required.

HUM 212  Introduction to African American Culture (3).

Prerequisite: ENG 110.

Exploration of the fusion of African and American cultures in the development of the African American culture, with particular emphasis on music, dance, oral literature, language, drama and art. 

 

HUX 340   Evolution of Human Culture (3). 

An examination of the nature of cultural change using the development of the city as a key concept.  Three representative types of cities with their cultures are studied:  ancient, medieval and modern.

HUX 343   The Autonomous Individual (3).

Interdisciplinary study of the nature of autonomy by focusing upon aesthetic creativity.

HUX 344   The Individual and Society (3). 

Exploration of the position of the individual in various models of social and political organization.  Study of the Utopian tradition and aesthetic theories connecting the artist with society.

HUX 345   The Non-Western World:  China and Japan (3).

Interdisciplinary study of the non-western world by focusing on some of the art, philosophy and music of China and Japan.

HUX 346   Alienation,  Estrangement, and Subcultures (3).

Survey of the elements and historical implications of alienation.  Examination of Hispanic and African American cultures.

HUX 347   Images of Humanity:  World Religious Perspectives (3). 

Survey of ancient and modern religious systems focusing upon general characteristics of religious belief.

HUX 348   Values and Morality in 20th Century Thought (3).

Survey of values and morality in modern culture in the context of seemingly amoral scientific and technological progress.

HUX 501   Defining the Humanities:  History (2).

Advanced study of the nature of history through examination of the Bolshevik Revolution.

HUX 502   Defining the Humanities:  Literature (2).

Advanced study of the nature of literature by examination of images of self in selected poems and novels.

HUX 503   Defining the Humanities:  Music (2).

Advanced study of music, focusing on concepts of meaning and form in music at a philosophical rather than theoretical level.  The ability to read music not required.

HUX 504   Defining the Humanities: Art (2). 

Advanced study of key concepts in art by focusing on aesthetics and art theory.

HUX 505   Defining the Humanities:  Philosophy (2). 

Advanced study of key concepts of Philosophy by focusing on contemporary issues and conflicts and their analogues in traditional philosophical readings.

HUX 521   Humanities Encounter: The Living Theatre (3).

How to recognize, appreciate and evaluate
a variety of dramatic experiences.  Requires extensive notebook of descriptions and analyses of five different types of theatrical performances.  Three additional theatrical encounter descriptions and analyses required.

HUX  522  Humanities Encounter: Concert Music (3). 

Attendance and analysis of several concerts representing the general categories of symphonic, vocal and chamber music.  Critical reviews required for each of four musical encounters.  Reviews of two additional musical encounters required.  Open to non-local students by special arrangement.

HUX  523  Humanities Encounter: Historical Sites (3).

Exploring the historical roots of one’s own community.  Requires papers (including photographs) involving descriptions and analyses of three different historical sites.  Papers on two additional sites required.  Open to non-local students by special arrangement.

HUX  524  Humanities Encounter: Film (3).

Watching and analyzing several movies with special focus on the techniques and content of the medium.  Requires extensive notebook of descriptions and analyses of five different film experiences.  Three additional film experience descriptions and analyses required.

HUX 530   War and Human Experience (3).

 Prerequisite:  HUX 501 is recommended.

An examination, through readings in history and literature, of the nature of war and its effect on individuals, families, groups and communities.  The course will draw on a wide range of examples, including conflicts in the ancient world, modern Europe and the United States.

HUX 532   Slavery in History and Literature (3).

 Prerequisite:  HUX 501

Examines the institution of slavery from an interdisciplinary humanistic perspective utilizing a comparative approach.  Surveys slavery from ancient times to the present in all parts of the world, with focus upon American slavery.

HUX  540  Evolution of Human Culture:  Western Civilization (3).

An examination of the nature of change and cultural unfolding, using the development of the city as a key concept, and looking into three representative types of cities: ancient, medieval and modern.

HUX  541  The Rational Perspective (3). 

The meaning of rationality from the perspectives of philosophy, history, literature, music, and art.  Special emphasis on the possible differences between scientific and humanistic rationality.

HUX  542  The Para-rational Perspective (3). 

Interdisciplinary exploration of non-rational alternatives in modern culture, focusing on the nonlogical, the visionary, and the religious/mystical.

HUX  543  The Autonomous Individual (3). 

Interdisciplinary study of the nature of the creative act, including the following: the artist’s vision of self; the defenses of personalism; notions of aesthetics and of symbolic thought.

HUX  544  The Individual and Society (3). 

Exploration of the position of the individual in the classic and modern models of social and political organization; conservatism, liberalism, socialism, anarchism; study of the Utopian tradition; and study of aesthetic theories that connect the artist with society.

HUX  545  The Non-Western World (3). 

Interdisciplinary examination of the non-western world by focusing on cultural characteristics of China and Japan.

HUX  546  Alienation, Estrangement and Subcultures (3). 

A survey of the elements and historical implications of alienation and examination of subcultures as they exist in America.  Readings from social Philosophy as well as from Chicano and African American studies.

HUX  547  World Religious Perspectives (3). 

A survey of ancient and modern religious systems, focusing upon an exploration of the general characteristics of religious beliefs.

HUX  548  Values and Morality in Twentieth Century Thought (3).

An examination of values and morality in modern culture against a backdrop of seemingly amoral scientific and technological progress.

HUX  550  Key Individuals, Art:  Frank Lloyd Wright (3).

Intensive study of the buildings and architectural influence of Frank Lloyd Wright.

HUX  551  Key Individuals, Music:  Beethoven (3). 

An examination of the life and music of Ludwig Van Beethoven; the ability to read music not required.

HUX  552  Key Individuals, Philosophy: Rousseau (3).

An examination of the life, thought, and influence of Rousseau, focusing on several recurrent themes: Self-other, rational nonrational, classic-romantic, dependence-independence, democracy-totalitarianism.

HUX  553  Key Individuals, Literature: Hemingway and Faulkner (3).

An examination of the major works and influence of two modern American authors, Ernest Hemingway and William Faulkner.

HUX 554   Key Individuals, History: Carnegie, Rockefeller and Ford (3).

Rise of American Industrial capitalism, viewed through the activities of three business giants, and the course of American economic history to the present, with special emphasis on World War I and the Great Depression.

HUX 555   Key Individuals, History:  Stalin (3).

Prerequisite:  HUX 501 is recommended.

Stalin was arguably the most powerful and effective leader in history, whose influence will be felt for ages to come.   Examines Stalin the person through a biography; his effect upon the people, through a novel; and his place in history as interpreted today.

HUX 556   Nobel Laureates: Studies in Modern World Literature (3).

Examination of representative major works by recent Nobel Laureates whose art epitomizes diverse cultural, literary, and social viewpoints. Authors include Mann, Pirandello, Camus, Kawabata, Solzhenitsyn, Neruda and Bellow.

HUX 557   Key Periods and Movements, Philosophy:  Greeks:  Philosophy, Tragedy and the Polis (3).

Prerequisite:  HUX 505 

An examination of the emergence of philosophy out of the "mythical" thinking that precedes and continues within it.  How classical Greek philosophy contrasted with Greek tragic poetry.

HUX 570   Key Periods and Movements, Art:  Contemporary (3).

Exploration of the complex cultural development known as modern art by investigation of six major artistic movements: Cubism, Expressionism, Dada/Surrealism, Pop Art, Conceptual Art and Technological Art.

HUX 571   Key Periods and Movements, Music: Baroque (3). 

Examination of Baroque music and the period in Western Europe (1600-1750) during which it evolved.  The ability to read music not required.

HUX 572   Key Periods and Movements, Philosophy: The Biblical Movement (3).

Examination of modern scholarship on the Bible and its impact on Christianity; analysis of 3 types of Bible interpretation: Fundamentalism, liberalism and humanism.

HUX 573   Key Periods and Movements, Literature: Archetypal Criticism (3). 

Exploration of a twentieth century movement in literature, archetypal criticism, which focuses on recurrent patterns in literature and their analogues in folktale, dream, ritual, and myth.

HUX 574   Key Periods and Movements, History: The Age of Revolution (3).

Study of the dynamics of economic change and political revolution with a comparison between the period 1776-1815 in Europe and North America and the period since World War II in Latin America.

HUX 575   Key Periods and Movements, Literature:  Nineteenth Century American Literature (3). 

Prerequisite:  HUX 502 is recommended. 

Studies in the American literary tradition focusing on classic fiction by Hawthorne, Twain, Howells, and James, writers who established the mainstream of our creative aesthetic.  Their novels, exploring evil, guilt, and sin, chronicles America's spiritual uncertainties and social turbulence.

HUX 576   Key Periods and Movements, Art:  Ancient Maya (3).

Prerequisites:  HUX 501  and HUX 504  are recommended.

An examination of the art and architecture of the Mayan civilization in Mesoamerica in the context of its history, mythology, and archaeology.

HUX 578   Key Periods and Movements, Literature:  Female Coming of Age in World Literature (3).   

Prerequisite:  HUX 502 is recommended.

 An examination of 20th century world literature by female authors writing on the theme of "coming of age."  Through fiction, poetry and autobiography from diverse world cultures including France, China, South Africa, Vietnam and the U.S., a study of the influence of ethnic background and cultural traditions on the coming of age experience.  Examines modern definitions of women and their survival and growth strategies.  Critical analysis in a compara-literature and cultures framework with feminist perspectives.

HUX 579   The Arab World:  600 AD to Present (3).

Prerequisite:  HUX 501 is recommended. 

Political and cultural history of the Arab World from the 7th century to the present.  Consideration of historiographic problems such as the "Great Man," cycles, and the influence of ideas on events.

HUX 580   Ancient Near East (3).

Prerequisite:  HUX 501 and two additional history courses. HUX 579 is recommended.

Ancient Egyptian and Sumerian political and cultural history and their impact on later civilizations.  Analysis of historical questions through study of artifacts, documents, inscriptions, and monuments.

HUX 581   Key Periods and Movements, Philosophy:  Philosophy and Postmodernism (3).

Prerequisite:  HUX 505  

Studies in contrasting meanings of postmodernism as it applies to philosophy.  The place of philosophy in culture; the reciprocal influences of philosophy, architecture, literature and art upon each other.

HUX 594   Independent Study (3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and program coordinator.

Individually designed faculty-guided study of a topic in (A) Literature, (B) History, (C) Philosophy, (D) Music, (E) Art, and (F) Interdisciplinary topics.  Repeatable for credit.  No more than 30% (9 units) of Independent Study courses from the total requirement of 30 units may be applied towards degree.

HUX 598   Final Project Proposal (1). 

Prerequisite:  15 units of HUX courses required. 

Required of all HUX M.A. students.  Must be passed with grade of A-B before registering for Final Project (HUX 599).  Successful completion advances student to candidacy.

HUX  599  Final Project (4-6).

Prerequisites:  Completion of Phases I and II; consent of instructor and program coordinator.

An individually planned project based on course work taken in the program and involving basic research in a single discipline or an interdisciplinary topic.  Supervised Thesis (599A) or Creative Project (599B).

HUX  600  Graduate Continuation Course (0).

Prerequisite: Consent of graduate program coordinator.

Graduate students who have completed their course work but not their thesis, project, or comprehensive examination, or who have other requirements remaining for the completion of their degree, may maintain continuous attendance by enrolling in this course.

 

IDS 320    Interdisciplinary Topics in Human Studies (3).

Provides an in-depth study of a topic in human behavior and attitudes.  The topic will be examined using interdisciplinary perspectives.  Examples of topics include class and careers, immigration and cultural impact and poverty.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of seminar per week.

IDS 326    Perspectives in Human Studies (3).

Special Topics course using nonstandard times and/or days to explore issues in the human behavior and attitudes.  Repeatable course. 

IDS 330    Interdisciplinary Topics in Civilizations (3).

Provides an in-depth analysis of a major topic in the history of ideas and  institutions through the study of the topic in relation to the disciplines relevant to the topic.  Sample topics include archetypal patterns in literature and history of modern thought.  Repeatable course.  

IDS 336    Perspectives in Civilizations (3).

Special Topics course using nonstandard times and/or days to explore issues in the history of ideas and institutions.  Repeatable course.  

IDS 350    Interdisciplinary Topics in Science, Technology, and the Environment (3).

Prerequisites:  Lower division General Education science courses.

Provides an in-depth investigation into a topic in science and/or technology, insights into the relationships of different disciplines and an understanding of the methods of scientific exploration.  Topics include scientific reasoning, technology and society, and environmental studies. Repeatable for credit as long as course topics are different.

IDS 380    Portfolio Preparation (1).

Prerequisite: Completion of 30 units in residence prior to assessment.

Supervised preparation of a Portfolio to Assess Prior Learning.  CR/NC grading.

IDS 382    Assessment of Prior Learning (1-11).

Prerequisite:  Completion of 30 units in residence prior to assessment.

Evaluation of Portfolio of Prior Learning. Prior learning is evaluated for credit by faculty experts in various departments. Credit may be used as elective units or, on approval of Department Chair, as part of requirements for a major or a minor. CR/NC grading.  Repeatable course.  

IDS 397    Writing Adjunct (2).

Prerequisites: ENG 100 and ENG 101 or IDS 107.

Individualized instruction in expository writing taught in conjunction with papers assigned in other courses.  Individual tutorial sessions and classroom lectures and workshops are employed.  CR/NC grading.  Repeatable course. 

IDS 398    Writing Adjunct (Competency Certification) (2).

Prerequisite: IDS 397.

Individualized instruction in expository writing taught in conjunction with papers assigned in other courses.  Individual tutorial sessions and classroom lectures and workshops are employed.  In-class essay writing and Cooperative Essay Exam. CR/NC grading. 

IDS 491    Thematic Project: Proposal (1).

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

Supervised development of a proposal which describes the Thematic Project.  Proposal will define a problem, outline means to solve problem and describe the final product resulting from the project.  Completed proposal contain advisor’s justification and will be approved by committee.  CR/NC grading.

IDS 492    Thematic Project: Fieldwork/Research (1,2,4).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Supervised activity in fieldwork and/or research necessary to carry through a thematic project.  Repeatable course.  

IDS 493    Thematic Project: Final Product (1,2,4).

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

Supervised activity in preparation of the final product necessary to carry through a thematic project.  Repeatable course. 

IDS 494    Independent Study (2,3).

Independent pursuit of a topic or project which is proposed by the student. Study must be interdisciplinary and must be approved, in advance, by faculty member supervising study.  Repeatable course.

 

IDS 360    Special Studies in Civilizations (1-3).

Prerequisites:  Upper division status and permission of instructor.

This course will investigate one or more special topics in Western and/or Non Western civilizations. Instruction will usually include off-campus activity such as, but not limited to, foreign travel.  Repeatable course.  

 

JPN 110    Beginning Japanese I (3).

An intensive audio-lingual approach to modern spoken Japanese for students who have no previous work in Japanese (with Japanese progressively replacing English as the medium of classroom communication). 

JPN 111    Beginning Japanese II (3).

Prerequisite: JPN 110 or equivalent. 

A continuation of Japanese 110. Introduction of Hiragana and Kanji (characters) gradually during the semester; elementary reading exercises accompany the spoken language materials. 

JPN 230    Japanese Conversation (3).

Prerequisite: One year of Japanese or consent of instructor. 

Speaking proficiency in standard modern Japanese.  Practice through dialogue and individual presentations to develop fluency for personal, commercial, and cultural activities.  May be repeated to a maximum of 6 units.  Repeatable course. 

 

KIN 111-180      Physical Education Activity (1).

The following courses are designed to promote active lifestyles and are open to all university students.  Prerequisites for intermediate level classes are beginning level or equivalent.  Prerequisites for advanced level classes are intermediate level or  equivalent. Students assume responsibility for satisfactory health status  appropriate for activity classes.  Repeatable course.  Two hours of activity per week.  Fee required for KIN 116-180.

KIN 111    Aerobics (1). 

KIN 112    Aerobics:  Step (1).

KIN 113    Social and Folk Dance Activity (1).

KIN 114    Badminton (1).

KIN 116    Baseball (1).

KIN 118    Basketball (1).

KIN 125    Bicycling/Beginning/Velodrome (1).

KIN 130    Golf (1).

KIN 132    Gymnastics (1).

KIN 141    Martial Arts (1).

KIN 142    Physical Conditioning (1).

KIN 145    Relaxation Techniques (1).

KIN 150    Soccer/Outdoor (1).

KIN 152    Softball (1).

KIN 156    Swimming/All Levels (1).

KIN 158    Swimming/Conditioning (1).

KIN 162    Tennis (1).

KIN 164    Volleyball (1).

KIN 170    Weight Training (1).

KIN 171    Yoga (1).

KIN 190    Intercollegiate Athletics - Sports (1).

Instruction and participation in selected major team sports such as basketball (men and women), baseball (men), and volleyball (women), tennis (women), cross country (women) that comprise the intercollegiate athletic program.  Repeatable course. 

KIN 218    First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (3).

Provides opportunity to qualify for American Red Cross certification in Standard First Aid and CPR.  Students study and practice administering first aid techniques; examine accident and injury prevention measures; and train to master cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques.   Fee required.

KIN 223    Introduction to Physical Education (3).

Examination of bodies of knowledge that make up the fields of Physical Education and Dance Education.  Analysis of how disciplinary theories translate into workable practices in a diverse culture. Course includes career guidance and overview of career options.  (Students entering the Physical Education major are required to enroll in this course their first semester of study.) 

KIN 233    Practicum in Physical Activity Instruction (3).

Designed to provide initial instruction in a variety of pedagogical knowledge related to teaching physical education for grades K-12. Students will be provided with opportunities to learn and demonstrate current best teaching practices. Emphasis is placed on learning and practicing effective planning, teaching, and reflective behaviors.

KIN 235    Lifetime Fitness (3).

Examination of components of fitness; training principles, energy sources; nutrition and weight control research; stress reduction techniques; and fitness programs.  Fitness assessment and development of personalized fitness program.  Meets General Education requirement for Whole Person. 

KIN 250    Analysis of Aquatics (2). 

Analysis and refinement of skill requirements; examination of concepts, rules, strategies, history and appreciations; and adaptations for special populations related to swimming, diving, synchronized swimming, aqua aerobics, water games and water safety.  One hour of lecture and two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

KIN 251    Analysis of World Dance (2). 

Analysis and refinement of skill requirements; examination of concepts, movement theories, history, culture and appreciations; and adaptations for special populations related to modern dance, jazz, ballet, social dance, folk dance, ethnic dance and dance-exercise.  One hour of lecture and two hours of activity per  week.  Fee required.

KIN 252    Analysis of  Artistic & Rhythmic Gymnastics (2). 

Analysis and refinement of skill requirements; examination of concepts, movement theories, judging, history and appreciations; and adaptations for special populations related to stunts, tumbling, floor exercise; apparatus work and object manipulation required of artistic and rhythmic gymnastics.  One hour of lecture and two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

KIN 253    Analysis of Archery, Bowling and Golf (2).

 Analysis and refinement of skill requirements; examination of concepts, rules, strategies, history and appreciations; and adaptations for special populations related to the individual sports of archery, bowling and golf.  One hour of lecture and two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

KIN 254    Analysis of Conditioning and Martial Arts (2). 

Analysis and refinement of skill requirements; examination of concepts, rules, strategies, underlying principles, history, culture and appreciations; and adaptations for special populations related to all components of physical conditioning, weight training and  martial arts.  One hour of lecture and two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

KIN 255    Analysis of Tennis, Paddle Tennis and Racquetball (2). 

Analysis and refinement of skill requirements; examination of concepts, rules, strategies, history and appreciations; and adaptations for special populations related to tennis, paddle tennis, racquetball and non-traditional racquet games.  One hour of lecture and  two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

KIN 256    Analysis of Badminton and Team Handball (2). 

Analysis and refinement of skill requirements; examination of concepts, rules, strategies, history and appreciations; and adaptations for special populations related to individual and dual sports of badminton and team handball.  One hour of lecture and two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

KIN 257    Analysis of Softball and Track and Field (2). 

Analysis and refinement of skill requirements; examination of concepts, rules, strategies, history and appreciations; and adaptations for special populations related to softball, track and field, and non-competitive diamond games.  One hour of lecture and two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

KIN 258    Analysis of Basketball and Volleyball (2). 

Analysis and refinement of skill requirements; examination of concepts, rules, strategies, history and appreciations; and adaptations for special populations related to team sports of basketball and volleyball.  One hour of lecture and two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

KIN 259    Analysis of Flag Football and Soccer (2). 

Analysis and refinement of skill requirements; examination of concepts, rules, strategies, history and appreciations; and adaptations for special populations related to the field sports of flag football and soccer and non-traditional field activities.  One hour of lecture and two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

 

KIN 300    Tests and Measurements in Physical Education (3).

Prerequisite:  Fulfillment of ELM requirement.

Analysis, evaluation, interpretation, and use of tests and other assessment methods in physical education. Application of statistical procedures.  Fee required.

KIN 301    Kinesiology (3).

Prerequisites:  BIO 250 and BIO 251 and either high school or college physics. 

Examination of anatomical structure, function, and mechanical principles relating to human motion, including analytical and practical application of concepts.  Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.  Fee required.

KIN 302    Technology Methods in Physical Education and Recreation (3).

Provides students with information on, training in, and experience with various technology methods and applications related to the Physical Education and Recreation professions.  One hour of lecture and two hours of laboratory activity per week.

KIN 303    Exercise Physiology (4).

Prerequisites:  KIN 300; BIO 250 and BIO 251 and either high school or college chemistry.

Study of human function under the stress of muscular activity per week.  Investigation of acute and chronic effects of exercise on the muscular, pulmonary, cardiovascular, nervous and energy systems.  Examination of principles of training and nutrition.  Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.  Fee required.

KIN 304    Introduction to Adapted Physical Education  (3).

Prerequisite: KIN 301.

Study of prevalent disabilities with implications for adapted physical education program development,  implementation and evaluation at the elementary and secondary levels. 

KIN 305    Motor Learning (3).

Prerequisite:  KIN 300. 

Study of human development and learning in the motor domain.  Examination of factors such as growth and maturation, instructional procedures, sensory and perceptual systems, motor control, and assessment of motor development. 

KIN 310    Nutrition for Peak Performance (3).

Prerequisite:  KIN 303

Presents principles of nutrition as they apply to sport, exercise, and peak performance.  Topics presented include:  energy release, metabolism, and substrate utilization during exercise, ergogenic aids, fluid intake, pre-game meals, and health issues related to nutrition. 

KIN 320    History and Philosophy of Physical Education (3).

Prerequisite:  KIN 223.

Study of historical roots and evolution of physical education, changing value systems that shape physical education philosophies, and administrative practices which lead to making informed program decisions. 

KIN 330    Somatic Education (3).

Prerequisite:  PSY 101.

Study of the nature of the human being as a continuum of body, mind and spirit integration.  Examination of how the areas of anatomy, physiology, kinesiology, sociology, psychology, and spirituality fuse and the idea of a holistic lifestyle emerges. 

KIN 360    Prevention and Treatment                ­of Athletic Injuries (3).

Prerequisites:  BIO 250, BIO 251 and KIN 301.

Prevention, examination, and treatment of athletic injuries. Includes methods of taping, bandaging, therapeutic exercises, training room equipment, protective devices and supplies.  Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.  Fee required.

KIN 362    Principles of Athletic Training (3).

Prerequisites:  BIO 250 and BIO 251, KIN 301.

The scientific and clinical foundation of the filed of athletic training.  Emphasis placed on athletic trainer's role and responsibilities.  In depth study of risk management, prevention, evaluation, recognition, treatment, and rehabilitation of athletic injuries.

KIN 363    Principles of Athletic Training  Laboratory (1).

Prerequisites:  BIO 250 and BIO 251

Corequisite:  KIN 362

Emphasis on knowledge, skills, and taping techniques for common athletic injuries and related evaluation procedures.

KIN 375    Clinical Experience I (1).

Prerequisites:  BIO 250, BIO 251, and KIN 218

Corequisites:  KIN 362, KIN 363

Introduction to clinical experience in athletic training settings.  Basic understanding of clinical aspect of the training profession.  Students in this class are required a minimum 50 hours of observation and 150 hours of clinical experience (a minimum of 10 per week) in athetic training settings.

KIN 376    Clinical Experience II (1).

Prerequisites:  KIN 362, KIN 363, KIN 375

Application of taping, wrapping, bracing, and padding skills; risk management; assessment and evaluation; pharmacology and nutrition; therapeutic modalities; therapeutic exercise; specific injury management.  Requires a minimum of 250 clinical experience hours (a minimum of 16 hours a week) in an athetic training setting.

KIN 377    Clinical Experience III (1).

Prerequisites:  KIN 376, KIN 461,  and KIN 463

Corequisites:  KIN 462 and KIN 464

The application of therapeutic exercise; surgery observation; specific injury management; clinical experience in various sports teams.  Requires a minimum of 250 clinical experience hours (a minimum of 16 hours a week) in an athetic training setting.

KIN 425    Physical Education in the  Elementary School (3).

Overview of bodies of knowledge in the field of physical education and their application to elementary physical education. Analysis of educational theories and practices as they relate to effectively teaching physical education to elementary school children.  Course includes peer teaching lessons.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.  Fee required.

KIN 426    Directed Teaching in Elementary Physical Education (2).

Prerequisite:  KIN 425.

Planned directed teaching in elementary physical education at a cooperating elementary school under professional supervision.  Repeatable course. 

KIN 447    Dance Education in the Elementary School (3).

Study of developmentally appropriate dance education activities for children.  Examination of and practice in blending pedagogical content knowledge with subject matter knowledge to optimize teaching and learning.  Course culminates in peer teaching lessons, reflections and self-assessment. 

KIN 448    Teaching Effectiveness in Secondary Physical Education (3).

Prerequisite:  See lower division requirements for major.

Analysis and application of recent advances in teaching methodology, observation techniques, organization and management strategies, and skill and knowledge acquisition as they relate to effectively teaching secondary physical education.  Course includes peer teaching lessons.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.

KIN 449    Directed Teaching in Secondary Physical Education (2).

Prerequisite:  KIN 448.

Planned directed teaching in secondary physical education at a cooperating secondary school under professional supervision.  Repeatable course. 

KIN 450    Teaching Dance (1).

Prerequisite:  Intermediate level technique class.

Analysis and application of recent advances in teaching methodology, observation techniques, organization and management strategies, and skill and knowledge acquisition as they relate to effectively teaching elementary, secondary and college dance.  Course includes peer teaching experience. 

KIN 461    Therapeutic Modalities (3).

Prerequisites:  BIO 250, KIN 362, KIN 363, and KIN 375.

A theoretical clinical basis for using therapeutic modalities, providing knowledge regarding the scientific basis and physiological effects of modalities in the treatment and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. Fee required.

KIN 462    Therapeutic Exercise (3).

Prerequisites:  BIO 250, KIN 362, KIN 363, KIN 375.

A theoretical and clinical basis for implementation and intervention of therapeutic exercise; understanding the basic principles and effects of the variety of therapeutic exercise techniques; and designing therapeutic exercise programs.

KIN 463    Lower Extremity Assessment (3).

Prerequisites:  KIN 375.

Recommended corequisite:  KIN 461

Recognition and evaluation of orthopedic and athletic injuries; identifying signs, symptoms and mechanisms of injuries; performing special tests for specific orthopedic pathologies related to the lower extremity.

KIN 464    Upper Extremity Assessment (3).

Prerequisites:  KIN 376.

Recommended corequisite:  KIN 462

Recognition and evaluation of orthopedic and athletic injuries; identifying signs, symptoms and mechanisms of injuries; performing special tests for specific orthopedic pathologies related to the upper extremity.

KIN 465    Administration of Athletic Training Programs (3).

Prerequisites:  KIN 461, KIN 462, KIN 463, and KIN 464.

Administration and management strategies of the field of athletic training and sports medicine.  Organization planning ideas including principles and knowledge of program, human, financial, and information managemen:  facility design and planning; legal aspects and ethical issues.

KIN 470    Coaching Techniques for Selected Sports (2).

Prerequisites:  KIN 253, KIN 256, KIN 257, KIN 258 and KIN 259; three out of five are recommended. 

Analysis and practical application of techniques for coaching selected sports.  Emphasis on organization and conduct of athletic programs, including program development, coaching strategies, practice sessions, academic advisement, recruiting and scouting. 

KIN 476    Clinical Experience IV (1).

Prerequisites:  KIN 377, KIN 462, KIN 463, and KIN 464

Corequisite:  KIN 465

The application of specific injury management; clinical experience in various sports teams. A minimum of 250 clinical experience hours (a minimum of 16 hours a week) in an athletic training setting are required.

KIN 477    Clinical Experience V (1).

Prerequisites:  KIN 476

The application of specific injury manage ment; clinical experience in various sports teams; peer teaching and supervision.  A minimum of 250 clinical experience hours (a minimum of 16 hours a week) in an athletic training setting are required.

KIN 480    Athletic Training Seminar (2).

Prerequisites:  KIN 465 and KIN 476

Course is designed for senior students who are preparing for he NATA BOC examination.  Students in this course are senior level students who have either completed all necessary NATA competencies or are in their last semester and currently completing the necessary competencies.

KIN 490    Senior Seminar in Physical Education (1). 

Prerequisite:  Senior year.  For Physical Education majors. 

Practice writing and presentation skills through self-reflection, evaluation, and connecting subject matter areas.  Peer and faculty evaluation of student portfolios, resume writing, curriculum development, mock interviews and program assessment will be included in the curriculum.  One hour of seminar per week.

KIN 494    Physical Education:  Independent Study (1-3).

Prerequisites:  Physical Education Major or Minor; upper division standing.

Independent study in physical education, with each student participating in a special project mutually agreed upon by student and instructor.  Repeatable course. 

KIN 495    Special Topics in Physical Education (1-3).

Intensive study of a physical education topic of current interest.  May be repeated for credit to a maximum of 6.0 units.  Repeatable course.  One to three hours of lecture per week.

KIN 496    Internship in Physical Education (1-3).

Prerequisites: Physical Education Major or Minor and upper division standing is required; KIN 448 is recommended.

Planned internship in physical education
at a cooperating institution, agency or company under professional supervision.  Application of the principles and skills acquired in the student’s chosen major program.  Repeatable course. 

 

KIN 500    Seminar in Contemporary Issues/Topics and Trends in Physical Education (3).

Analysis of current trends, issues, and problems in Physical Education academic and athletics programs; examination and analysis of literature and research findings. Three hours of seminar per week.

KIN 514    Seminar in Curriculum Development in Physical Education (3).

Intensive study, evaluation, and application of current developments in curriculum theory and practice for Elementary-Secondary School Physical Education.  Includes designing an innovative physical education/wellness curriculum project.  Three hours of seminar per week.

KIN 516    Public Relations and Development (3).

The study of public relations and development issues related to the fields of physical education and athletics in K-16 school settings.  The student will develop news releases, design promotional public information, develop mediated presentations addressing programs and development Three hours of seminar per week.

KIN 593    Fieldwork in Physical Education and Athletic Administration (3).

Prerequisites:  GED 570, GED 571 and KIN 500 is required; KIN 514 and KIN 516  are recommended.

Supervised field experiences at the school level to include actual job performance in both supervision and administrative in Physical Education or Athletics.  Students will demonstrate competencies required by the Educational Administration approved program.  CR/NC grading.

KIN 599    Thesis/Creative Project (3).

Prerequisites:  KIN 500, KIN 514, KIN 516, KIN 593, GED 506, and GED 514 are required; GED 570 and GED 571  are recommended.

Student will execute an individually planned research effort or creative project.  Students work under individual supervision with assigned faculty.  May be repeated up to 6 units.

KIN 600    Graduate Continuation Course (0).

Graduate students who have completed their course work but not their thesis, project, or comprehensive examination, or who have other requirements remaining for the completion of their degree, may maintain continuous attendance by enrolling in this course.

KIN 100    Adapted Physical Fitness (1).

Physical fitness evaluation, exercise prescription and individualized programs designed for disabled students and any student with a temporary or permanent fitness need.  Repeatable course.  Two hours of activity per week.

Physical Education Activity Courses

KIN 134    Jogging (1).

KIN 140    Lifeguard Training (Red Cross) (1). 

Prerequisite: Red Cross Emergency Water Safety Skills.

KIN 148    Soccer/Indoor (1).

KIN 154    Stretch and Flex (1).

KIN 168    Walking for Health (1).

KIN 180    Intramurals (1).

Participation in competitive intramural activities.  Tournaments conducted in sports such as basketball, badminton, tennis, volleyball and additional activities based upon student interest. Repeatable course.  Two hours of activity per week.

KIN 260    Sports Officiating (2).

Rules, mechanics and officiating procedures for men’s and women’s sports at the interscholastic and intercollegiate levels.

KIN 504    Physical Fitness Evaluation and Exercise Prescription (3).

Prerequisites:  KIN 303 is required; KIN 218 is recommended.

Evaluation of cardiovascular fitness, respiratory capacity, body composition, strength, muscular endurance and flexibility. Exercise prescription based upon individual needs, interests and preliminary health and fitness evaluations.  Overview of American Psychological Association’s research methodology. 

 

LBR 411   Contracts and Negotiations (3).

The process of negotiating, writing and  enforcing a labor contract.  An overview of the historical events that have affected contemporary negotiation practices.  A survey and analysis of labor contracts in various sectors of industry, including a workshop in contract writing and negotiation. 

LBR 412   Labor Law (3).

Legal history of the American labor movement.  Survey of federal  and state laws regulating employment, collective bargaining, contract clauses, arbitration, collective actions, lockouts, unfair labor practices and fair employment practices. 

LBR 490   Seminar in Labor Studies (3).

Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of instructor. 

An integrative course to study selected topics, to develop an overview of the field and to relate theory and practical application.  Students will develop seminar papers as they complete an internship in a labor organization or research an area of labor studies.  Three hours of seminar per week.

LBR 495   Special Topics in Labor Studies (1-4).

An intensive study of an issue or a concept in Labor Studies that is of special interest to faculty and students.  Topics vary (e.g., Special Topics: Labor in the 60’s; Public Employees). Repeatable course.  Three hours of lecture per week.

LBR 496   Practicum in Labor Studies (3).

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor is required. 

Directed field research or supervised internship.  Training and research in the practice and policies of a labor organization or labor-related governmental agency.  Repeatable course.    

LBS 010    CBEST Preparation in Reading (1).

Specifically designed to assist participants in developing skills and knowledge necessary for passing the reading section of the CBEST (California Basic Educational Skills Test).  Upon successful completion of the course competencies, the participant will be able to demonstrate ability in the reading areas to be tested as outlined in the CBEST Registration Bulletin.  CR/NC grading.

LBS 020   CBEST Preparation in Writing (1).

Specifically designed to assist participants in developing skills and knowledge necessary for passing the writing section of the CBEST (California Basic Educational Skills Test).  Upon successful completion of the course competencies, the participant will be able to demonstrate ability in the writing areas to be tested as outlined in the CBEST Registration Bulletin.  CR/NC grading.

LBS 030   CBEST Preparation in  Math (1).

Specifically designed to assist participants in developing skills and knowledge necessary for passing the mathematics section of the CBEST (California Basic Educational Skills Test).  Upon successful completion of the course competencies, the participant will be able to demonstrate ability in the mathematical areas to be tested as outlined in the CBEST Registration Bulletin.  CR/NC grading.

LBS 200   Introduction to Liberal Studies (1).

Prerequisite:  CBEST exam is highly recommended

Introduction to the Liberal Studies major and to the teaching profession.  Study of K-8 California Content Standards, orientation to campus services, and beginning electronic portfolio entries for subject matter assessment.  Computer technology for future teachers will be introduced and examined, with practical applications including email, databases, web searches, and electronic portfolios. CR/NC grading.

LBS 300   Service Learning for Liberal Studies Majors (1).

Prerequisite:  Restricted to Liberal Studies majors.  LBS 200. Students must (1) attempt to pass CBEST and provide LBS program with scores; (2) provide a copy of current (within 1 year) negative Tuberculosis test; and (3) provide copy of application for a Certificate of Clearance.

Designed to provide Liberal Studies majors with service learning opportunities as part of an early field experience for students preparing for teaching careers.  Observations/participation will be structured according to course requirements and students will reflect on the nature of their experience and how this affects their development as prospective teachers.  Students will complete a minimum of two hours per week of service learning in local public schools.  The service learning experience will be linked to core Liberal Studies courses for subject matter content.  Graded CR/NC only.

LBS 360   Blended Math Methods:  Math Content  and Pedagogy (4).

Prerequisite:  Admittance to the Blended Liberal Studies/Teacher Education Program.

Designed to assist the student in the development of mathematical content knowledge and pedagogical skills necessary for the effective teaching of elementary mathematics in the urban classroom.

LBS 370   Multicultural Studies:  Teaching in a Diverse Society (5).

Prerequisite:  Admittance to the Blended Liberal Studies/Teacher Education Program.

Introduces students to the challenges of teaching in urban schools.  Topics include multiculturalism, social scientific theory, and educational research regarding the schooling of ethnic and language minority students.

LBS 380   Blended Science Methods:  Science Content and Pedagogy (4). 

Prerequisite:  Admittance to the Blended Liberal Studies/Teacher Education Program.

Designed to assist the student in the development of science content knowledge and pedagogical skills necessary for the effective teaching of elementary science in the urban classroom. 

LBS 400   Senior Seminar in Liberal Studies (3).

Prerequisite:  LBS 300.

Provides a culmination of the Liberal Studies experience and an introduction to the Teacher Education Credential Program.  Requirements include 15 hours of observation and participation in urban, multilingual and multicultural school settings with both regular and special education students.  Course topics include credential program overview, introduction to Teacher Performance expectations and Assessment system and electronic portfolio, the California Content Standards, lesson planning, and the professional, legal, and ethical responsibilities of teachers.

LBS 401   Multiple Subject Matter Equivalency Evaluation Class (1).

Prerequisite:  Approval of Program Director.

Fulfills the subject matter assessment requirement of the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing for students completing the Multiple Subject Matter Equivalency Program.  Includes assessment of subject matter knowledge and review of the current state curriculum standards for K-8 instruction. CR/NC grading.

LIB 150     Library Skills and Strategies (2). 

Designed  to acquaint students with the use of academic libraries.  Practical exercises will develop skills for effectively utilizing library resources to fulfill research needs.  One hour of lecture and two hours of activity per week.

LIB 495     Special Topics in Library Research (1). 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

In-depth study of information retrieval in a particular format  or discipline, e.g. government documents, on-line databases, business resources.  One hour of lecture per week.

MFT 570 Theories of Marital and Family Therapy (3).

Theory, research, and practicum in the general areas of preparation for marriage, sex education, and the role of the child in the family.  Knowledge of the theories and skills in counseling evaluated. Three hours of seminar per week.

MFT 572 Techniques of Marital and Family Therapy: Adults and Children (3).

Psychotherapeutic techniques in marriage and family counseling applied to treatment of adults and children.  Practice in family therapy, crisis counseling, and the various approaches to marital conflict resolution, including premarital and divorce counseling.  Counseling skills evaluated.  Three hours of seminar per week.

MFT 574  Human Sexual Behavior (3).

Advanced study of the psychological, physiological, and sociological aspects of human sexual behavior, with attention to the origin and treatment of sexual dysfunction in its environmental context. Examinations and/or papers used in evaluation.

MFT 576 Studies in Human Communication  (3).

The processes of communication as these apply to both interpersonal and intrapersonal experience.  Emphasis on the purposes of communication as well as the forms that are believed to enhance the conduct of counseling and psychotherapy.  Exams and/or papers. 

MFT 578  Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy:  Research, Diagnosis and Treatment  (3).

Focus on psychotherapeutic treatment of children and adolescents.  Instruction in use of the DSM IV for diagnosis.  Includes review of research methodology and findings in the field of child and adolescent psychotherapy.  Therapeutic skills assessed.  Three hours of seminar per week.

MFT 580 Cross-cultural Family Values and Behavior (3).

Cultural factors affecting human behavior in complex societies.  Emphasis upon the cultural behavior of the major ethnic groups in the United States as it relates to family organization and critical life choices.

MFT 584 Legal and Ethical Aspects of Counseling (3).

Legal and ethical aspects of marriage contracts, adoption, dissolution and separation, confidentiality and privileged communication, research, professional and  client interaction, malpractice, court testimony by the professional and the release of information, and professional standards in advertising. 

MFT 586  Current Issues in Marital and Family Therapy (3).

A capstone seminar reviewing recent trends in the marriage, family, and child  counseling field.  Theoretical developments, newly emerging techniques, and current academic applied knowledge and issues.  Review of requirements for MFT licensure.  Three hours of seminar per week.  Signature of graduate program coordinator required.

MFT 596  Internship/Practicum for   Marital and Family Therapy (3).

Students directed to appropriate agencies and centers to work as intern trainees within their chosen area of specialization.  Weekly meetings scheduled with a faculty internship supervisor to assess student progress.  Course must be repeated four semesters by MFT students.  CR/NC grading.

MFT 597  Directed Reading for MFT Comp Preparation (3).

In consultation with the faculty member, completion of readings to prepare for the comprehensive exam.  The course is limited to students who have completed one year of courses.  CR/NC grading.  Course is repeatable for a total of 65 units.

MFT 600  Graduate Continuation Course (0). 

Graduate students who have completed their course work but not their thesis, project, or comprehensive examination, or who have other requirements remaining for the completion of their degree, may maintain continuous attendance by enrolling in this course.  Signature of graduate program coordinator required.

MAT 003 Beginning Algebra (3).

Integers, rational and real numbers, basic algebraic expressions, ratio, percent, solutions and graphs of linear equations, inequalities, polynomials, applications.  Does not count for Bachelor's degree. CR/NC grading. 

MAT 009  Intermediate Algebra (3).

Prerequisite:  MAT 003 or satisfactory score on ELM test.

Polynomials, factoring, rational expressions, quadratic equations, roots, radicals, radical expressions, exponents, logarithms, graphs, applications.  Does not count for the Bachelor's degree. CR/NC grading. 

MAT 095  Special Topics in Mathematics (3).

A course in a topic of special interest to both faculty and students for which no current course exists.  Topic will be announced in schedule of classes.  Repeatable for credit.  CR/NC grading

MAT 105 Finite Mathematics (3).

Prerequisite:  Fulfillment of ELM requirement.

Mathematics of finance, combinatorics, probability, statistical measures of central tendency and dispersion, problem solving and mathematical reasoning, and additional topical selected by instructor e.g. linear programming, statistics, graph theory, game theory.  A-C/NC grading. Satisfies the General Education Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

MAT 107  Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers: Real Numbers (3).

Prerequisite: Fulfillment of  ELM requirement. 

Sets and set theoretic operations as related to counting numbers and rational numbers and arithmetic operations. Real number system and its origins, development, structure and use.  Special emphasis on problem solving and the development and application of algorithms.  Does not satisfy General Education Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

MAT 131  Elementary Statistics and Probability (3).

Prerequisite:  Fulfillment of ELM requirement.

A practical course in probability and statistics including such topics as the binomial and normal distributions, confidence intervals, t, F, and chi-square tests, linear regression and correlation, and conditional probability.  Satisfies the General Education Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

MAT 141 Computers for Mathematics Teaching  (3).

Prerequisite:  Fulfillment of the ELM requirement. 

Introduction to computers for teachers of mathematics.  Topics include flowcharting, programming in LOGO on microcomputers.  Applications of computers to problem solving, statistics, and other areas of mathematics relevant to teachers of mathematics.  Applications packages, CAI and social issues are studied.  A-C/NC grading.  Does not satisfy General Education Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

MAT 143  Problem Solving in Mathematics (3).

Prerequisite:  Fulfillment of the ELM requirement. 

Objective is to increase students abilities to use knowledge and experience when encountering new and unexpected situations.  Develop higher level thinking skills, learn to formulate, analyze, and model problems.  Choosing relevant information, making conjectures, devising plans and testing solutions.   A-C/NC grading.  Does not satisfy General Education Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

MAT 153  College Algebra and Trigonometry (4).

Prerequisites:  MAT 009 or equivalent.

Topics include functions and their graphs; systems of linear and quadratic equations; ratios, proportion, variation; sequences; mathematical induction; the binomial theorem; complex numbers; theory of equations and trigonometry.  Satisfies the General Education Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

MAT 171  Survey of Calculus for Management and Life Sciences (4).

Prerequisite:  Fulfillment of ELM requirement. 

Not available for credit to students who have credit in MAT 191 or its equivalent or courses which have MAT 191 as a prerequisite. Functions, linear equations, the derivative and its applications, the integral and its applications, and partial derivatives.  Satisfies the General Education Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

MAT 191  Calculus I (5).

Prerequisite:  MAT 153 or equivalent with a grade of “C” or better and fulfillment of ELM requirement.

Limits, continuity, derivatives, differentiation formulas, applications of derivatives, introduction to integration, fundamental theorum of calculus, application of integration. Satisfies the General Education Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

MAT 193  Calculus II (5).

Prerequisite:  MAT 191 or equivalent with a grade of “C” or better.

Differentiation and integration of transcendental function.  Techniques and applications of integration.  Polar coordinates.  Infinite sequences and series, power series, convergence.  Satisfies the General Education Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

MAT 207  Mathematics for Elementary  School Teachers:  Geometry (4).

Prerequisite: Satisfaction of ELM required.

Primarily for prospective elementary school teachers.  Geometry from an intuitive problem solving standpoint.  Constructions, symmetry, translations, rotations, patterns, area, volume, and the metric system.  Topics from graph theory and topology.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week. Does not satisfy General Education Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.

MAT 211  Calculus III (5).

Prerequisite:  MAT 193 or equivalent with a grade of “C” or better.

Multivariable calculus: analytic geometry, scalar and vector products, partial differentiation, multiple integration, change of coordinates, gradient, optimization, line integrals, Green's theorem, elements of vector calculus. 

MAT 241  Programming and Technology for Teaching Secondary School Mathematics  (3).

Prerequisite:  MAT 193 or equivalent with a grade of “C” or better.

Introduction to application software appropriate for the teaching of secondary school mathematics.  The programs include spreadsheet, geometric modeling, and statistics modeling.  Writing simple programs for graphing calculators to demonstrate and solve mathematical problems. 

MAT 271  Foundations of Higher  Mathematics (3).

Prerequisite:  MAT 153 or equivalent with grade of “C” or better.  MAT 191 with grade of "C" or better is recommended.

Topics include logic, methods of mathematical proof, set theory, relations and functions. Introduction to complex numbers and proof strategies using ideas of vector algebra.  Meant to prepare students for mathematics program as well as concepts of computer science. 

MAT 281  Discrete Mathematics (3).

Prerequisite: MAT 271 and CSC 121 or MAT 241 or CSC 111 or equivalent with grade of “C” or better.

Matrix algebra, graph theory, trees, combinatorics, Boolean algebra; with applications to computers and computer programming. 

MAT 295  Selected Topics in Mathematics (1-4). 

Prerequisites: MAT 193 and consent of instructor. 

A course in a topic of special interest to both faculty and students for which no current course exists.  Topic will be announced in schedule of classes.  Repeatable for credit.  One to four hours of lecture per week.

MAT 297  Independent Study (1-4).

Prerequisites: MAT 193, consent of instructor and consent of department chair.

A reading program of selected topics not covered by regularly offered courses conducted under the supervision of a faculty member.

MAT 311  Differential Equations  (3).

Prerequisite: MAT 211 and MAT 271 with a grades of “C” or better.

Topics covered include first and second order linear equations including existence and uniqueness theorems, series solutions; nonlinear equations; systems of linear equations. Other topics may include the Laplace transform, qualitative theory. 

MAT 321  Probability and Statistics (3).

Prerequisite:  MAT 193 and MAT 271 or equivalent with grade “C” or better.

A calculus based survey of topics in probability and statistics emphasizing applications. 

MAT 331  Linear Algebra (3).

Prerequisite:  MAT 271 or equivalent with a grade of “C” or better.

Linear equations, vector spaces, matrices, linear transformations, determinants, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, etc. 

MAT 333  Abstract Algebra (3).

Prerequisite:  MAT 271 or equivalent with a grade of “C” or better.

The theory of groups, rings, ideals, integral domains, fields and related results.

MAT 347  Modern Geometry (3).

Prerequisite:  MAT 271 or equivalent with a grade of “C” or better.

Topics in synthetic and analytic geometry; transformations, similarity, congruence, distance, angles, constructions; introduction to projective and/or non-Euclidean geometry. 

MAT 361  Finite Automata (3).

Prerequisite:  MAT 281 or equivalent with a grade of “C” or better.

Study of the abstract formalization of digital computers.  Applications to computation theory and formal linguistics. 

MAT 367  Numerical Analysis I (3).

Prerequisites:  Experience in BASIC, FORTRAN or Pascal and MAT 211 or equivalent with a grade of “C” or better.

Approximation of roots of functions, interpolation formulas, numerical solutions of systems of equations, numerical differentiation and integration, numerical solutions to ordinary differential equations. 

MAT 395  Selected Topics in Mathematics (1-4). 

Prerequisites: MAT 211 and consent of instructor. 

A course in a topic of special interest to both faculty and students for which no current course exists.  Topic will be announced in schedule of classes.  Repeatable for credit.  One to four hours of lecture per week.

MAT 401  Advanced Analysis I (3).

Prerequisites: MAT 211 and MAT 271, or equivalent with a grade of “C” or better.

Elements of set theory, numerical sequences and series, continuity and differentiability of functions of one and several variables. 

MAT 403  Advanced Analysis II (3).

Prerequisite: MAT 401 or equivalent with a grade of “C” or better.

Integration of functions of one and several variables, sequences and series of functions, uniform convergence, power series, differentiation of functions of several variables. 

MAT 411  Mathematical Modeling (3).

Prerequisite: MAT 211, MAT 271, and MAT 241 or CSC 121 or CSC 111, or equivalent with a grade of “C” or better.  MAT 311 or equivalent and MAT 331 are recommended.

Flexible course content depending on interest of instructor and students. Possible topics are: epidemic and predator-prey models from differential equations; linear programming models;  Arrow’s theorem; and probability models. 

MAT 413  An Introduction to Partial Differential Equations (3).

Prerequisites:  MAT 311 with a grade of “C” or better is required; MAT 213 is recommended. 

Solutions to partial differential equations by separation of variables and Fourier series. Applications to heat flow and diffusion, wave motion, and potentials.  Some discussion of existence and uniqueness of solutions. 

MAT 421  Complex Analysis (3).

Prerequisites:  MAT 211 and MAT 271 with a grade of “C” or better.  MAT 331 and MAT 401 (may be taken concurrently) are recommended.

Complex numbers; point  sets, sequences and mappings; analytic functions; elementary functions; integration; power series; the calculus of residues; and applications. 

MAT 443  History of Mathematics (3).

Prerequisite:  MAT 193 with a grade of "C" or better.

Traces the growth and development of mathematics from primitive origins to present, uses methods and concepts of mathematics to present the topics. 

MAT 447  Number Theory (3).

Prerequisite:  MAT 271 with a grade of "C" or better.

Divisibility, congruencies, prime number theory, Diophantine Equations, and other topics from elementary number theory. 

MAT 489  Fundamental Mathematics and Teaching in Secondary Schools (3).

Prerequisite:  9 units of 300/400-level mathematics with a grade of “C” or better.

Synthesis and analysis of secondary mathematics and its teaching.  Emphasis on algebraic thinking and its teaching in high school.  Observation and discussion of teaching is an important activity in this course.

MAT 490  Seminar in Mathematics Education (3).

Prerequisite:  9 units of 300/400 mathematics courses with a grade of "C" or better.

The synthesis and analysis of the secondary mathematics curriculum from an advanced standpoint.  Emphasis will be on the integration of problem solving, investigations, reasoning, and communication as recommended in state and national standards.

MAT 495  Selected Topics in Mathematics (1-4).

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and MAT 271.

A course in a topic of special interest to both faculty and students for which no current course exists. Topic will be announced in schedule of classes.  Repeatable for credit.  One to four hours of lecture per week.

MAT 497  Independent Study (1-4).

Prerequisites: MAT 213, consent of instructor and consent of department chair. 

A reading program of selected topics not covered by regularly offered courses conducted under the supervision of a faculty member.

MAT 500  Mathematics Education Research Design and Statistics (3).

Prerequisites:  Students must have graduate standing and must have completed one year of full time secondary mathematics teaching.

Includes topics such as normal distribution, confidence intervals, t, F, chi-squared tests, linear regression, and correlation.  These topics are presented in the context of mathematics education research in typical classrooms.

MAT 501  Foundations of Geometric Thinking (3).

Prerequisites: MAT 543 or concurrent enrollment.  Students must have graduate standing and must have completed one year of full time secondary mathematics teaching.

Research on Various topics in geometry.  Focus on developing notions of rigorous proof and grade-appropriate explanations.  Topics are chosen from the Geometry areas and standards emphasized in K-12. 

MAT 505  Foundations of Mathematical Structures (3).

Prerequisites: MAT 543 or concurrent enrollment.  Students must have graduate standing and must have completed one year of  full time secondary mathematics teaching.

Topics include the algebraic properties of sets and operations applied to classical number systems, equivalence, modular arithmetic, Diophantine equations, decomposition of natural numbers, special families of natural numbers, current research on understanding and learning these topics.

MAT 506  Foundations of Rational Numbers (3).

Prerequisites:  MAT 543 or concurrent enrollment.  Students must have graduate standing and must have completed one year of full time secondary mathematics teaching.

Covers theory and applications of Rational numbers.  Focus on number systems, representation of numbers, equivalence classes, rationality and irrationality, properties of the rational numbers system, central ideas of proportional reasoning, and developing intuitive models of standard rules and algorithms.

MAT 515  Topics in Advanced Finite Mathematics (3).

Prerequisites:  Possession of a baccalaureate degree and one year of full-time secondary mathematics teaching.

Topics from areas of Modern Mathematics which relate to the high school mathematics curriculum such as:  algorithms, graph theory, coding theory, game theory, finite probability theory, difference equations, voting, recursion.

MAT 521  Geometry for Teachers (3).

Prerequisites: MAT 543, graduate standing and one year of full time secondary mathematics teaching.

Topics from Geometry including:  points and lines in a triangle, properties of circles, collinearity, concurrence, transformations, arithmetic and geometric means, isoperimetric theorems, reflection principle. 

MAT 522  Foundations of Algebraic Thinking (3).

Prerequisites: Students must have graduate standing and must have completed one year of full time secondary mathematics teaching.

Patters, functions, and multiple representations; independent and dependent variables; discrete and continuous functions; linear and nonlinear relationships in context; connections to arithmetic operations; algebraic expressions and equations.  Examines current research on the understanding and learning of these topics.

MAT 523  Theory of Functions for Teachers  (3).

Prerequisites:  MAT 543, graduate standing and one year of full time secondary mathematics teaching.

Topics from Function Theory including:  mathematical models, linear functions, non-linear functions, transformations, limits, continuity, functions of several variables.

MAT 525  Algebraic Structures for Teachers (3).

Prerequisites:  MAT 543, graduate standing and one year of full time secondary mathematics teaching.

Topics relating to the high school Algebra curriculum from an advanced standpoint including algorithms, fields, polynomials, groups, fields, and rings. 

MAT 543  Advanced Problem Solving for Teachers (3).

Problem solving using non-routine strategies.  Problems to be representative of several branches of mathematics and mathematically based disciplines.

MAT 545  History of Mathematics Education (3).

Prerequisites:  Graduate standing and one year of full time secondary teaching. 

Traces the development of the mathematics curriculum K-12 in the United States and internationally, concentrating both on content taught at different stages and the teaching methods employed.  Reviews the various mathematics reform efforts over the past 170 years.

MAT 557  Research in Mathematics Education I (3).

Prerequisites:  MAT 500 and 15 units of program.

Overview of the current research literature pertaining to mathematics education in elementary and secondary schools. Topics such as mathematical reasoning, communication, problem solving, algebra, and geometry will be discussed and analyzed.

MAT 559  Research in Mathematics Education II (3).

Prerequisite:  MAT 557.

Overview of the current research literature pertaining to mathematics education in elementary and secondary schools. Topics such as mathematical reasoning, communication, problem solving, algebra, and geometry will be discussed and analyzed.

MAT 590  Graduate Seminar in Mathematics Education (1-4).

Prerequisites:  Possession of a baccalaureate degree and one year of full-time secondary mathematics teaching.

Presentation and discussion of selected topics in Mathematics Education. Repeatable course.

MAT 594  Independent Study (1-4). 

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair. 

In consultation with a faculty member, the student will investigate in detail current scholarship in some area.  Repeatable course.

MAT 595  Selected Topics (1-4).  

 An intensive study of selected issues in mathematics education.  Repeatable course.

MAT 597  Directed Reading (1-4). 

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair. 

Extensive reading in selected areas under the guidance of faculty mentor.  Repeatable course.

MAT 598  Directed Research  (1-4).  

Prerequisite:  Classified graduate standing. 

Students will design and conduct research projects under the direct supervision of the instructor.   Repeatable course.

MAT 599  Masters Project  (6). 

Prerequisite:  Advancement to Candidacy. 

Completion of classroom based project under the guidance of faculty advisor.  The culminating learning experience of the program which emphasizes the application of the mathematics education curriculum in the classroom.

MAT 600  Graduate Continuation Course (0).    

Graduate students who have completed their course work but not their thesis, project, or comprehensive examination,
or who have other requirements remaining for the completion of their degree, may maintain continuous attendance by enrolling in this course.  Signature of graduate program coordinator required.

MAT 213  Calculus IV  (4).

Prerequisite:  MAT 211 or equivalent with a grade of “C” or better.

Topics covered include vector calculus, line and surface integrals, and the theorems of Green, Gauss, and Stokes. 

MAT 337  Mathematical Logic (3).

Prerequisite:  MAT 191 or equivalent with a grade of “C” or better.

Topics covered include propositional calculus, classical and intuitionistic; completeness and consistency theorems; first order predicate calculus with equality; axiomatic arithmetic; Godel’s incompleteness theorem.

MAT 351  Probability Theory (3).

Prerequisite:  MAT 193 or equivalent with a grade of “C” or better.

Probability as a mathematical system, set theory, conditional probability and independent events, random variables, distribution and density functions, covariance and correlation, limit theorems, convolutions, computer generation of random numbers. 

MAT 353  Stochastic Processes (3).

Prerequisite: MAT 351 or equivalent with a grade of “C” or better.

A selection from among several topics, including Markov chains; Markov processes; queuing, branching, Poisson, and Gaussian processes; stationary processes. 

MAT 369  Numerical Analysis II (3).

Prerequisite: MAT 367 or equivalent with a grade of “C” or better.

A continuation of MAT 367, including approximation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors, approximation by splines, numerical solutions of parabolic, elliptic, and hyperbolic partial differential equations. 

MAT 451  Mathematical Statistics (3).

Prerequisite: MAT 351 or equivalent with a grade of “C” or better.

Sums of independent random variables; functions of random variables; chi-square, F, and t distributions; estimation of parameters; maximum-likelihood, unbiased, consistent, minimum-variance, and minimum-mean- square error estimators; confidence intervals; central limit theorem. 

MAT 517  Fractals for Teachers (3).

Prerequisites:  Possession of a baccalaureate degree and one year of full-time secondary mathematics teaching.

Topics from Fractal and Chaos Theory including:  the Cantor Set, Koch Curve, Julia Sets, space filing curves.  Brownian motion and Chaotic behavior.  Selections to relate to the high school mathematics curriculum. 

MAT 555  Research in Mathematics Education (3).

Prerequisites:  GED 500 and consent of program.

Integrates previous work and experience by emphasizing the application of theoretical models and research designs to the field of mathematics education.  Special emphasis will be given to analyzing, organizing, and evaluating findings, and communicating the results. 

MSL 101   Foundations of Officership (1).

Recommended corequisite:  MSL 103.

Introduces students to issues and competencies that are central to a commissioned officer’s responsibilities.  Establishes framework for understanding officership, leadership, and followed army values including “life skills” such as physical fitness and time management.

MSL 103  Military Science and Leadership Lab for MSL 101 (1).

Corequisite: MSL 101.

Course is designed to  assist students with no military background.  The student will be a member of a squad and receive instruction on small unit tactics, army values, army leadership techniques and selected critical individual military skills.  Lab is encouraged by optional unless contracted.  CR/NC grading.

MSL 102  Basic Leadership (1).

Recommended corequisite: MSL 104.

Establishes foundation of basic leadership fundamentals such as problem solving, communications, goal setting, techniques for improving listening and speaking skills, briefings and effective writing and an introduction to effective counseling.

MSL 104  Military Science and Leadership Lab for MSL 102 (1).

Corequisite:  MSL 102.

Course is designed to assist students with no military background.  The student will be a member of a squad and receive instruction on small unit tactics, army values, army leadership techniques and selected critical individual military skills.  Lab is encouraged but not required unless contracted.  CR/NC grading.

MSL 201  Individual Leadership Studies (2).

Recommended prerequisite:  MSL 102; recommended corequisite:  MSL 203.

Students identify successful characteristics through the observation of others and through experimental learning exercises.  Students record observed traits (good and bad) in a dimensional learning journal and discuss the observations in a small group setting.

MSL 203  Military Science and Leadership Lab for MSL 201 (1).

Recommended prerequisite:  MSL 102, MSL 104;  recommended corequisite:  MSL 201.

Student will transition into becoming a small group leader and will perform duties of military fire team leader and squad leader.  Cadet will learn army values, leadership techniques and selected individual military skills.  Lab is encouraged but not required unless contracted.  CR/NC grading.

MSL 202  Leadership and Teamwork (2).

Recommended prerequisite:  MSL 201; recommended corequisite:  MSL 203.

Students identify successful characteristics through the observation of others and through experimental learning exercises.  Students record observed traits (good and bad) in a dimensional learning journal and discuss the observations in a small group setting.

MSL 204  Military Science and Leadership Lab for Msl 202 (1).

Recommended prerequisite: MSL 101, MSL 103; corequisite:  MSL 202.

Student will perform duties of military fire team leader and squad leader.  Cadet will learn army values, leadership techniques and selected individual military skills.  Students will be assessed for leadership performance.  Lab is encouraged but not required unless contracted.  CR/NC grading.

MSL  301  Leadership and Problem Solving (3).

Prerequisites:  MSL 202 and MSL 204 or consent of instructor; corequisite:  MSL 303.

Students conduct self-assessment of their leadership style, develop personal fitness programs and learn how to plan and conduct small unit training while testing their reasoning and problem solving techniques.  Students receive direct feedback on their leadership skills.

MSL  303  Military Science and Leadership Lab for MSL 301 (1).

Prerequisites:  MSL 202 and MSL 204, or consent of instructor; corequisite:  MSL 301.

Course teaches leadership skills, counseling, oral and written communications, supervision, and preparation an conduct of training.  CR/NC grading.

MSL 302  Leadership and Ethics (3).

Prerequisites:  MSL 301 and MSL 303; corequisite:  MSL 304.

Examines the role communications, values, and ethics play in effective leadership.  Topics include ethical decision-making, consideration of others, spirituality in the military, and survey Army leadership doctrine.  Emphasis on improving oral and written communication abilities.

MSL 304 Military Science and Leadership Lab for MSL 302 (1).

Prerequisites:  MSL 301 and MSL 303; corequisite: MSL 302.

Student serves in various leadership positions including squad, platoon and company levels.  Responsible for developing and executing unit plans and orders; training other students, executing small unit tactics and preparing for Advanced Camp Training/Evaluation.  CR/NC grading.

MSL 401  Leadership Management (3).

Prerequisites:  MSL 302 and MSL 304; corequisite:  MSL 403.

Develops the students’ proficiency in planning and executing complex operations, functioning as a member of a staff and mentoring subordinates.  Students explore training management, methods of effective staff collaborations and developmental counseling techniques.

MSL 403  Military Science and Leadership Lab for MSL 401 (1).

Prerequisites:  MSL 302 and MSL 304; corequisite: MSL 401.

Accepted as a cadet in the ROTC program, cadet will serve in leadership positions at the platoon, company and battalion levels.  Responsible for planning, execution, and evaluation of ROTC training activities.  Cadet will also serve as mentor for junior cadets. CR/NC grading.

MSL 402  Officership (3).

Prerequisites:  MSL 401 and MSL 403; corequisite:  MSL 404.

Study includes case study analysis of military law and practical exercises on establishing an ethical command climate.  Students must complete a semester long leadership project that requires them to plan, organize, collaborate, analyze and demonstrate their leadership skills.

MSL 404  Military Science and Leadership Lab for MSL 402 (1).

Prerequisites:   MSL 401 and MSL 403; corequisite: MSL 402.

Accepted as a cadet in the ROTC program, cadet will serve in leadership positions at the platoon, company and battalion levels.  Responsible for planning and evaluation of ROTC training activities.  Cadet will serve as mentor for junior cadets.  Upon completion of course, the cadets will be prepared to serve as commissioned officers.  CR/NC grading.

MUS 100 Concert Music I (1).

Grade based on verified attendance at seven approved concerts and final essay exam.  Orientation and final exam are the only class meetings.  Instructor available two office hours each week for guidance.  Open to all students.  Maybe repeated once.  CR/NC grading.

MUS 101 Introducing Music (3).

The technique of listening to music.  The elements of music, musical forms, and historical styles.  Concert attendance and discussion will be an integral part.  Satisfies a General Education Requirement.

MUS 109 Introduction to Musicianship (1).

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in MUS 101or MUS 110 is recommended.

An activity course in which students will begin exercises in music perception skills, pitch matching, identification of musical patterns, beginning ear-training and sight-singing drills. Preparation for the Musicianship Proficiency Exam.  Repeatable course.  Two hours of activity per week.

MUS 110 Music Fundamentals (3).

Prerequisite:   Concurrent enrollment in MUS 109 is recommended.

Music rudiments taught through reading, writing, harmonizing and creating songs. Includes principles of notation, key signatures, scales, intervals, triads and chord progressions.  Satisfies a General Education Requirement.

MUS 111  Introduction to Music Theory (3).

Prerequisite:  MUS 110 or placement test. 

Elements of music taught through reading, writing and harmonizing at the keyboard.  Topics include key signatures, scales, intervals and basic harmony. 

MUS 120 Beginning Voice Class (1).

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

Fundamental principles of singing. Posture, breath control, tone production, diction and performance techniques and  styles.  Repeatable course.  Two hours of activity per week.

MUS 121 Beginning Piano Class (1).

Prerequisite:  Previous or concurrent enrollment in MUS 101 and MUS 110 or consent of instructor.

Beginning instruction in keyboard technique. Repeatable course.  Two hours of activity per week.

MUS 170 Chamber Music (1).

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

Study of music through small instrumental ensemble rehearsal and performance.  Type of group may vary. See Class Schedule for title.  Public performances expected.  Repeatable once.  Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 171 Chamber Singers (1).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Study of music through small vocal ensemble rehearsal and performance.  Public performances expected.  Repeatable once. Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be  arranged.

MUS 172 Jubilee Choir (1).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Study and performance of choral music of Afro-American culture.  Public performances expected. Repeatable once.  Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 173 Jazz Ensemble (1).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Techniques of improvisation and a study and performance of instrumental jazz repertoire.  Public performances expected.  Repeatable once.  Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 176 Orchestra (1).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

A study of music through rehearsal and performance of music for symphony orchestra.  Public performances expected.  Repeatable once.  Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 177 Chorus (1).

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

A study of music through rehearsal and performance of music for chorus.  Public performances expected.  Repeatable once. Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 179 Music Theater Workshop (1).

Prerequisites:  Audition and consent of instructor.

Study of roles and representative excerpts from opera, operetta, and musical comedy and the basic musical, dramatic and language technique of the musical theater. Performance of excerpts or complete musical theatrical works. Repeatable once.  Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 180 Individual Lessons (1).

Prerequisites:  Audition and consent of Department Chair and Instructor.

Individual instruction in the student’s major performance medium developing technique and repertoire.  Individual one-half hour lesson times are arranged with the studio teacher.  Public performance and jury evaluation expected.  Lessons are available in voice, piano, harpsichord, organ, accordion, flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, saxophone, trumpet, horn, trombone, tuba, percussion, violin, viola, cello, string bass, harp, classical guitar, lute, commercial guitar, and electric bass.  Primarily for performance majors.  Instrument fee may be required.  Repeatable course. 

MUS 200 Concert Music II (1).

Prerequisite: MUS 100.

Grade based on verified attendance at seven approved concerts and final essay exam.  Orientation and final exam are the only class meetings.  Instructor available  two office hours each week for guidance.  Open to all students.   Repeatable once.  CR/NC grading.

MUS 209 Musicianship Skills (1).

Prerequisites:  Placement exam and consent of instructor.  MUS 101, MUS 109, and MUS 110 are recommended.

Ear training, sight-singing, rhythm, keyboard harmony, and melodic and rhythmic dictation.  This course is meant to parallel work in MUS  210 and MUS 211.  Repeatable course.  Two hours of activity per week.

MUS 210  Music Theory I (3).

Prerequisites:  MUS 101 and MUS 111 or consent of department. 

Musical theory emphasizing materials from the Common Practice Period (1700-1900).  The vocabulary of diatonic scales and modes, chords and their relationships, phrase structure and cadences, harmonic progressions, non-harmonic tones and the technique of harmonization. 

MUS 211 Music Theory II (3).

Prerequisites: MUS 210 and concurrent enrollment in MUS 209 or consent of instructor.

Chromatic Harmony of the Common Practice Period. Harmonic analysis, secondary dominants, modulation, borrowed chords, augmented sixth chords, Neapolitan sixth chords, diminished sevenths, and ninth, eleventh and thirteenth chords. 

MUS 220 Intermediate Voice Class (1).

Prerequisites:  MUS 101, MUS 110 and MUS 120 or Consent of instructor.

Singing with an emphasis on the vocal mechanism, use of the voice in ensemble singing and style in songs.  Development of solo repertoire.  Repeatable course.  Two hours of activity per week.

MUS 221 Intermediate Piano Class (1).

Prerequisites:  MUS 101, MUS 110 and MUS 121 or Consent of instructor.

Intermediate instruction in keyboard technique.  Keyboard harmony, scales, chords and improvised accompaniments.  Repeatable course.  Two hours of activity per  week.

MUS 270 Chamber Music (1).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Music study through small instrumental ensemble rehearsal and performance.  Type of group may vary. See Class Schedule for title.  Public performances expected.  Repeatable once.  Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 271 Chamber Singers (1).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Study of music through small vocal ensemble rehearsal and performance.  Public performances expected.  Repeatable once. Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 272 Jubilee Choir (1).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Study and performance of choral music of Afro-American culture.  Public performances expected. Repeatable once.  Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 273 Jazz Ensemble (1).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Techniques of improvisation and a study and performance of instrumental jazz repertoire.  Public performances expected.  Repeatable once.  Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 276 Orchestra (1).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Rehearsal and performance of music for symphony orchestra.  Public performances expected.  Repeatable once.  Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 277 Chorus (1).

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

Rehearsal and performance of music for chorus.  Public performances expected.  Repeatable once.  Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 279 Music Theater Workshop (1).

Prerequisites:  Audition and consent of instructor.

Study of roles and representative excerpts from opera, operetta, and musical comedy and the basic musical, dramatic and language technique of the musical theater. Performance of excerpts and complete musical theatrical works. Repeatable once.  Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 280 Individual Lessons (1).

Prerequisites:  Audition and consent of department chair and instructor.

Individual instruction in the student’s major performance medium developing technique and repertoire.  Individual lesson times are arranged with the studio teacher.  Some lessons may be off-campus.  Public performance and jury evaluation expected. Lessons are available in voice, piano, harpsichord, organ, accordion, flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, saxophone, trumpet, horn, trombone, tuba, percussion, violin, viola, cello, string bass, harp, classical guitar, lute, commercial guitar, and electric bass.  Primarily for performance majors.  Instrument fee may be required.  Repeatable course. 

MUS 294 Independent Study  (1-3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

The student investigates a scholarly topic or undertakes directed research or a creative project with the assistance of a Music faculty member.  Repeatable course. 

MUS 300 Concert Music III (1).

Prerequisite: MUS 200.

Graded on verified attendance at seven approved concerts and final essay exam.  Orientation and final exam are the only class meetings.  Instructor available two office hours each week for guidance.  Open to all students.  Repeatable once.  CR/NC  grading.

MUS 301 Music in World Cultures (3). 

Prerequisite:  MUS 101 or 110 or consent of instructor.

Survey of non-Western cultures from  a musical point of view. Using familiar folk and popular music for comparison, students will be guided into new listening experiences, develop a vocabulary for discussing world music, and gain an appreciation of cultural pluralism. 

MUS 308 Popular and Jazz Harmony (3).

Prerequisite:  MUS 210 or consent of instructor.

Analysis of chords and scale patterns, chord symbols, and chord substitutions in popular music and jazz. 

MUS 309 Advanced Musicianship Skills (1).

Prerequisites: Musicianship placement exam and consent of instructor.

Ear training, sight-singing, rhythm, keyboard harmony, and melodic, harmonic and rhythmic dictation.  This course parallels work in MUS 310 and MUS 311 and provide preparation for the Musicianship Proficiency Exam.  Repeatable course.  Two hours of activity per week.

MUS 310 Advanced Music Theory I (3).

Prerequisites:  MUS 101 and MUS 211 or consent of department. 

Structural, contrapuntal and harmonic analysis of musical forms from the Medieval through the Classical periods. A study of the literature, instrumentation, and notation.  Practice includes aural analysis and creative composition. 

MUS 311 Advanced Music Theory II (3).

Prerequisites:  MUS 310 or consent of instructor is required; concurrent enrollment in MUS 309 and MUS 316 is recommended.

Structural, harmonic and contrapuntal analysis of musical forms from the Romantic period through the Twentieth Century.  A study of the literature, instrumentation and notation.  Practice includes aural analysis  and creative composition. 

MUS 315 Counterpoint (3).

Prerequisite: MUS 211 or consent of instructor.

Counterpoint as a linear mode of compositional technique in Western music.  Modal, tonal and post-tonal practices. 

MUS 316 Instrumentation (3).

Prerequisite: MUS 211 or MUS 308.

Acoustical and musical characteristics of all the major orchestral and band instruments.  Written assignments will include transcriptions for combination of instruments both as families and mixed ensembles. 

MUS 320 Advanced Voice Class (1).

Prerequisites: MUS 101, MUS 110 and MUS 220 or consent of instructor.

Singing with emphasis on vocal mechanism, use of the voice in ensemble singing, and style in songs. Development of solo repertoire in foreign languages.  Repeatable course.  Two hours of activity per week.

MUS 321 Advanced Piano Class (1).

Prerequisites:  MUS 101, MUS 110 and MUS 221 or consent of instructor.

Advanced instruction in keyboard technique.  Development of solo repertoire and preparation for the Piano Proficiency Exam.  Repeatable course.  Two hours of activity per  week.

MUS 325 Conducting (3).

Prerequisite: MUS 310 or consent of instructor.

An introduction to the basic techniques of conducting both instrumental and choral groups.  Score reading, baton technique and fundamentals of interpretation.  Repeatable course.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.

MUS 340 Music for Children (3).

Prerequisites:  MUS 101 and MUS 110 or consent of instructor.

Survey and analysis of music suitable for children.  History and philosophy of American music education emphasizing influences of European systems of Kodaly, Dalcroze, and Orff.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.

MUS 370 Chamber Music (1).

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

Study of music through small instrumental ensemble rehearsal and performance.  Type of group may vary by section and semester. See Class Schedule for title.  Public performances expected.  Repeatable once.  Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 371 Chamber Singers (1).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Study of music through small vocal ensemble rehearsal and performance.  Public performances expected.  Repeatable once. Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 372 Jubilee Choir (1).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Study and performance of choral music of Afro-American culture.  Public performances expected. Repeatable once.  Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 373 Jazz Ensemble (1).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Techniques of improvisation and a study of performance of instrumental jazz repertoire.  Public performances expected.  Repeatable once.  Three hours of activity per week  plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 376 Orchestra (1).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

A study of music through rehearsal and performance of music for symphony orchestra.  Public performances expected.  Repeatable once.  Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 377  Chorus (1).

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

A study of music through rehearsal and performance of music for chorus.  Public performances expected.  Repeatable once. Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 379 Music Theater Workshop (1).

Prerequisites:  Audition and consent of instructor.

Study of roles and representative excerpts from opera, operetta, and musical comedy and the basic musical, dramatic and language technique of the musical theater. Performance of excerpts and complete musical theatrical works. Repeatable once. Three hours of activity per week plus extras rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 380 Individual Lessons (1).

Prerequisites:  Audition and consent of department chair and instructor.

Individual instruction in the student’s major performance medium. Development of technique and repertoire.  Individual lesson times are arranged with the studio teacher.  Some lessons may be off-campus.  Public performance and jury evaluation expected. Lessons are listed in the Class Schedule by voice or instrument. Lessons are available in voice, piano, harpsichord, organ, accordion, flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, saxophone, trumpet, horn, trombone, tuba, percussion, violin, viola, cello, string bass, harp, classical guitar, lute, commercial guitar and electric bass. Primarily for performance majors.  Instrument fee may be required.

MUS 385 Medieval and Renaissance Music (3).

Prerequisites:  MUS 101 and MUS 110 or consent of instructor.

Music from the Medieval period through the Renaissance.  Gregorian chant, Leonin, Perotin, Machaut, Dufay, Ockeghem, Josquin, Gombert, Willaert, Palestrina, Lasso, Gabrielli and other composers.  Study of styles of music to uncover the various musical, aesthetic, and social determinants underlying the musical literature. 

MUS 386 Baroque and Classical  Music (3).

Prerequisites:  MUS 101 and MUS 110 or consent of instructor.

Music from the Baroque through the Classical period.  Monteverdi, Schutz, Scarlatti, Bach, Handel, Couperin, Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven and other composers.  Study of styles of music to uncover the various musical, aesthetic, and social determinants underlying the musical literature. 

MUS 400 Concert Music IV (1).

Prerequisite: MUS 300.

Attendance at on-campus and off-campus concerts and recitals. Open to all students.  Grade based on verified attendance at seven approved concerts and final essay exam.  Orientation and final exam are the only class meetings.  Repeatable course.  Instructor available two office hours each week for guidance.  CR/NC grading.

MUS 401 Afro-American Music (3).

Prerequisite:  MUS 101 or consent of instructor.

The influence of African and Afro-American musical ideas on the culture of America and the world moving from folk material through the development of jazz and its subsequent influence on both the popular and the symphonic worlds in the twentieth century. 

MUS 415  Composition and Arranging: Art Music (3).

Prerequisite:  MUS  311 or consent of instructor.

Composition and arranging of art music utilizing a variety of resources, from traditional instruments and voice to new instruments, electronics and computer.  Repeatable course. 

MUS 416 Composition and Arranging: Popular and Jazz (3).

Prerequisite:  MUS 308 or consent of instructor.

Composition and arranging for popular and jazz ensembles with an emphasis on contemporary styles.  Repeatable course. 

MUS 420 Vocal and Choral                Techniques (3).

Prerequisite:  MUS 320  or consent of instructor.

Voice physiology and function, common vocal faults, pedagogical approaches and methodology in both the choral and private instructional context.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.

MUS 440 Introduction to Orff Schulwerk (3).

Prerequisites: MUS 101 or MUS 110 or consent of instructor.

Basic principles of the early childhood music teaching methods developed by Carl Orff.  Music education through movement, singing, speech and  drama and use of Orff musical instruments.  Two hours of lecture and two hours of activity per week.

MUS 445 String Instruments (1).

Prerequisite:  MUS  110 or consent of instructor.

Introduction to the principles and literature of string instruments, with emphasis on skills necessary for future teachers of instrumental ensembles.  Repeatable course.  Two hours of activity per week.  Instrument fee may be required.

MUS 446 Woodwind Instruments (1).

Prerequisites:  MUS 110 or consent of instructor.  Instrument fee may be required.

Introduction to the principles and literature of woodwind instruments with emphasis on skills necessary for future teachers of instrumental ensembles.  Repeatable course.  Two hours of activity per week.

MUS 447 Brass Instruments (1).

Prerequisite:  MUS 110 or consent of instructor.

Introduction to the principles and literature of brass instruments with emphasis on skills, necessary for future teachers of instrumental performance times to be arranged.

MUS 448 Percussion ­­­Instruments (1).

Prerequisite:  MUS 110 or consent of instructor.

Introduction to the principles and literature of percussion instruments with emphasis on skills necessary for future teachers of instrumental ensembles.  Repeatable course.  Two hours of activity per week.  Instrument fee may be required.

MUS 470 Chamber Music (1).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Study of music through small instrumental ensemble rehearsal and performance.  Type of group may vary by section and semester.  See Class Schedule for title.  Public performances expected.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 471 Chamber Singers (1).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Study of music through small vocal ensemble rehearsal and performance.  Public performances expected.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 472 Jubilee Choir (1).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Study and performance of choral music of Afro-American culture.  Public performances expected.  Repeatable course. 
Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 473 Jazz Ensemble (1).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Techniques of improvisation and a study and performance of instrumental jazz repertoire.  Public performances expected.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged. 

MUS 476 Orchestra (1).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

A study of music through rehearsal and performance of music for symphony orchestra.  Public performances expected.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 477 Chorus (1).

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

A study of music through rehearsal and performance of music for chorus.  Public performances expected.  Repeatable course.  Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 479 Music Theater Workshop (1). 

Prerequisites:  Audition and consent of instructor.

Study of roles and representative excerpts from opera, operetta, and musical comedy and the basic musical, dramatic and language technique of the musical theater. Performance of excerpts and complete musical theatrical works. Repeatable course.  Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 480  Individual Lessons (1).

Prerequisites: Audition and  consent of department chair and instructor.

Individual instruction in the student’s major performance  medium.  Development of technique and repertoire.  Audition and consent of department and instructor required.  Individual lesson times are arranged with the studio teacher.  Some lessons may be off-campus. Public performance and jury evaluation expected.  Lessons are listed in the class schedule by voice or instrument.  Lessons are available in voice, piano, harpsichord, organ, accordion, flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, saxophone, trumpet, horn, trombone, tuba, percussion, violin, viola, cello, string bass, harp, classical guitar, lute, commercial guitar, and electric bass. Primarily for performance majors.  Instrument fee may be required.  Repeatable course. 

MUS  481               Individual Lessons:  Composition and Arranging (1).

Prerequisites:  Consent of department chair and instructor.

Individual instruction and guidance with music composition and arranging projects.  Individual lesson times are arranged with the instructor.  Jury evaluation expected.  Primarily for composition majors.  Repeatable course.  

MUS 483 The Interpretation of Music (1).

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in upper division individual lessons or consent of instructor.

Exploration of a wide variety of topics relating to the interpretation of music from various stylistic periods.  Recorded examples and student performances will be analyzed and compared with particular attention given to historic authenticity and contemporary practices.  Repeatable course.  Two hours of activity per week.

MUS 485 Romantic Music  (3).

Prerequisites: MUS 101 and MUS 110 or consent of instructor.

Music of the Nineteenth Century. Beethoven, Von Weber, Schubert, Schumann, Berlioz, Liszt, Wagner, Brahms, Bruckner, Mahler, Wolf, Strauss, Verdi, Puccini and other composers.  Study of styles of music to uncover the various  musical, aesthetic, and social determinants underlying the musical literature.  Offered every other year.

MUS 486 Twentieth Century Music (3).

Prerequisites:  MUS 101 and MUS 110 or consent of instructor.

Stravinsky, Schoenberg, Bartok, Cowell, Varese, Cage, Glass and other composers representing the various movements in twentieth century music.  Offered every other year.

MUS 493 Recital (1).

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in MUS 480 or MUS 580.

Preparation and performance of a full or half music recital.  Repeatable course. 

MUS 494 Independent Study  (1-3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

In consultation with a Music faculty member, the student investigates a scholarly topic or undertakes a creative project.  Repeatable course. 

MUS  495               Special Studies in Music (1-3).

Special topics vary by section and semester.  See Class Schedule for title and prerequisites.  Repeatable course. 

MUS 496 Music Internship (1-3).

Prerequisite:  Consent of department chair.

Students participate in an off-campus internship with an approved employer.  Provides for an integration of academic study and related work experience. CR/NC grading.  Repeatable course. 

MUS 499 Senior Project (3).

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and department chair.

In consultation with a Music faculty member, student undertakes a major project which may be  one of the following:  original research and thesis on a given music history or theoretical topic, a creative project such as an original composition or a full recital with supporting scholarly program notes.

 

MUS 580 Performance, Performance               Practices and Repertoire (2).

Prerequisites:  Audition and consent of department chair and instructor.

ensembles.  Repeatable course.  Two hours of activity per week.  Instrument fee may be required.

MUS 581 Individual Lessons:  Composition and Arranging (1).

Prerequisites:  Consent of department chair and instructor.

Individual instruction and guidance with music composition and arranging projects.  Individual lesson times are arranged with the instructor.  Jury evaluation expected.  Primarily for composition majors.  Repeatable course. 

MUS 582 Individual Lessons: Conducting (1).

Prerequisites: Consent of department chair and instructor.

Individual instruction and guidance in the technique of conducting instrumental and vocal ensembles.  Individual lesson times are arranged with the instructor.  Public performance and jury evaluation expected.  Primarily for conducting majors.  Repeatable course. 

MUS  593               Recital (1).

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in MUS 580.

Preparation and performance of a full or half music recital.  Repeatable course.  

MUS  594               Independent Study (1-3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of instructor and department chair.

In consultation with a Music faculty member, the student investigates a scholarly topic or undertakes a creative project.  Repeatable course. 

MUS 122 Beginning Guitar Class (1).

Prerequisite:  Previous or concurrent enrollment in MUS 101 and MUS 110 or consent of instructor is recommended.

Beginning instruction in guitar technique, single string melody, and chord positions.  Repeatable course.  Two hours of activity per week.

MUS 175 Band (1).

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

A study of music through rehearsal and performance of concert band music.  Public performances expected.  Repeatable once.  Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 222 Intermediate Guitar Class (1).

Prerequisites:  MUS 101, MUS 110 and MUS 122 or consent of instructor. 

Intermediate instruction in guitar technique, scales, chords and improvised accompaniments.  Repeatable course.  Two hours of activity per week.

MUS 275 Band (1).

Prerequisite:  Consent of instructor.

Rehearsal and performance of concert band music.  Public performances expected.  Repeatable once. Three hours of activity per week plus extra rehearsal and performance times to be arranged.

MUS 305 Music for Dance  (1).

Prerequisite: MUS 110 or consent of instructor.

An introduction to music fundamentals and techniques for dance accompaniment.  Two hours of activity per week.

MUS 322 Advanced Guitar Class (1). 

Prerequisites:  MUS 101, MUS 110 and MUS 222 or consent of instructor.

Advanced instruction in guitar technique.  Development of solo repertoire. Repeatable course.  Two hours of activity per week.

MUS 402 American Music  (3).

Prerequisite: MUS 101 or consent of instructor.

An examination of selected works in American music from colonial times to the present, concentrating on the emergence of several important styles and composers in the Twentieth Century and their relationship to American society.

MUS 408 Advanced Song Writing (3). 

Prerequisite:  MUS 308 or consent of instructor.

Original songs created by students will be performed, discussed, and constructively criticized.  Well-known popular, show, country, rock and R and B songs will be studied as models of melodic, harmonic, rhythmic, structural and poetic composition.  Field trips and guest lecturers from the industry. Publishing and copyright procedures. 

MUS 415  Composition and Arranging: Art Music (3).

Prerequisite:  MUS  311 or consent of instructor.

Composition and arranging of art music utilizing a variety of resources, from traditional instruments and voice to new instruments, electronics and computer.  Repeatable course. 

 

NCR 500  Gratuate Writing Skills (3).

Advanced techniques for organizing, creating a first draft, and revising with emphasis on critical thinking , and expository and persuasive writing in a professional setting in the field of negotiation, conflict resolution an peacebuilding.

NCR 504  Theories of Conflict (3).

Critical analysis of conflict theories and models among individuals, organizations and governments; exploring causes, functions and effects.  Perspectives from anthropology, archaeology, biology, communications, economics, gender studies, geography, history, mathematics, political science, psychology, psychiatry, sociobiol­ogy, and sociology.  Three hours of seminar per week.

NCR 507  Seminar: Research Design and Interpretation  (3).

Consideration of research methods used in the behavioral sciences.  Elements of research design including problem formulation; sampling, data collection, instrument development; problems of reliability and validity; selection, calculation, and interpretation of appropriate descriptive and inferential statistics.  Three hours of seminar per week.

NCR 508 Communication and Conflict (3).

Prerequisite: NCR 504                            

Emphasizes human communication in context of conflict. Addresses challenges to effective communication caused by interpersonal, intrapersonal, intergroup or intragroup conflict, and role of communication in resolving such conflicts. Concentrates on methods of communication most effective in dealing with differences.

NCR 522  Seminar: Negotiation Tactics  (3).

Prerequisites: NCR 504

Tactics used in negotiations among individuals, institutions, and societies. Planning and conducting personal, corporate, labor, hostage, and diplomatic negotiations.  Cross-cultural, ethical, and historical dimensions. Three hours of seminar per week.

NCR 525  Mediation (3).

Prerequisites: NCR 504, NCR 507, NCR 508, and NCR 522

Theory and skills including requirements for certification under the California Dispute Resolution Programs Act, especially agreement procedures, case development, consensus building, issue framing and prioritizing, orientations toward conflict, and record keeping. Three hours of seminar per week.

NCR 527  Arbitration (3).

Prerequisites: NCR 504, NCR 507, NCR 508, and NCR 522.

Compulsory and noncompulsory arbitration of grievances in public, private, corporate, labor, and international disputes. Case studies explore the arbitration role in unique settings. Three hours of seminar per week.

NCR 529  Internship: Conflict Resolution (3).

Prerequisites: NCR 504, NCR 507, NCR 508, and NCR 522 and either NCR 252, NCR 527, NCR 544 and consent of program director

Students will work as interns in agencies in conflict resolution and consult weekly with a faculty supervisor.  Total of 120 hours of agency experience.

NCR 530 Online Dispute Resolution (ODR) (3).

Prerequisites:  NCR 504, NCR 507, NCR 508, NCR 522, and either NCR 525, NCR 527, or NCR 544

Addresses emerging practice of conflict resolution in cyberspace. ODR utilizes online resources as the “fourth party” collaborating with the traditional third party in resolving conflicts more efficiently and less expensively.

NCR 531  Divorce and Family Mediation (3) FS.

Prerequisites: NCR 504, NCR 507, NCR 508, NCR 522 and either NCR 525, NCR 527, or NCR 544;  MFT students may enroll with permission of the NCR Program Director and MFT Coordinator, without satisfying NCR prerequisites.

Separation problems in traditional and nontraditional relationships such as property division and child custody.  Legal, tax, and financial aspects. The mediation process. Written and oral agreements. Three hours of seminar per week.

NCR 532 Dispute Resolution Clinical Studies (3).

Prerequisites:  NCR 504, NCR 507, NCR 508, NCR 522, and NCR 525

Advances skills and techniques of mediation and provides opportunity for students who have completed NCR 525 to mediate live client cases under faculty supervision. Students must be available to mediate six hours per week during normal business hours.  . S.

Prerequisites: NCR 504, NCR 507, NCR 508, NCR 522, and either NCR 525, NCR 527 or NCR 544.

Case and historical studies in selected industries. Past, present, and pending court decisions or national and state labor laws. Strategic planning for labor organizations. The process of negotiating a labor contract. Grievance and arbitration procedures. Three hours of seminar per week.

NCR 535  Organizational Conflict (3).

Prerequisites: NCR 504, NCR 507, NCR 508, NCR 522, and either NCR 525, NCR 527 or NCR 544.

Origin and types of conflicts which arise within and between complex  organizations. Positive and negative effects of  Organizational conflict. Exploiting, preventing, containing, escalating, and resolving conflict.  Three hours of seminar per week.

NCR 536 Dispute Resolution for Sports  (3).

Prerequisites: NCR 504, NCR 507, NCR 508, NCR 522, and either NCR 525, NCR 527 or NCR 544.

Examines sports law and dispute resolution utilizing particularly the processes of arbitration and mediation.  Focuses on players, owners, agents and unions, as well as other areas of conflict such as free agency and player attitude and disloyalty. Three hours of seminar per week.

NCR 537  International Conflict (3).

Prerequisites: NCR 504, NCR 507, NCR 508, NCR 522, and either NCR 525, NCR 527 or NCR 544.

 Study of selected bi- and multinational conflicts involving complex issues such as peace and trade. Common misconceptions about diplomacy.  Case studies of specific treaties. Crisis management.   The effect of culture on negotiations.  Three hours of seminar per week.

NCR 538  Seminar:  Public Policy  Conflict (3).

Prerequisites: NCR 504, NCR 507, NCR 508, NCR 522, and either NCR 525, NCR 527 or NCR 544.

Negotiated rulemaking, conciliation, and facilitation for resolving complex, multi­party disputes over complex public disputes such as immigration, prison siting, toxic waste disposal and zoning.  Three hours of seminar per week.

NCR 540  Seminar:  Community  Conflict (3).

Prerequisites: NCR 504, NCR 507, NCR 508, NCR 522, and either NCR 525, NCR 527 or NCR 544.

The impact of system dynamics on conflict management on communities from neighborhoods to nations.  Implications of system dynamics for specifying goals and planning interventions to achieve them, from pre-emptive to corrective.  Implications for training and organization.   Three hours of seminar per week. 

NCR 541  Restorative Justice (3).

Prerequisites:  Consent of the NCR Program Director (and CJA Chair concerning enrollment by CJA students with senior standing).

Addresses respective needs of crime victims and offenders which the criminal justice system has ignored.  Retribution is abandoned in favor of a restorative model based on the needs of victims and offenders, achieved through application of conflict resolution processes.  Three hours of seminar per week

NCR 542  Collaborative Law (3).

Prerequisites:  NCR 504, NCR 507, NCR 508,   and NCR 522

Lawyers’ and clients’ cooperative voluntary conflict resolution process.  Emphasizes shared belief that it is in best interest of parties to avoid adversarial proceedings. Commitment to resolving differences with minimal conflict and working together to create shared solutions to the issues.  Three hours of seminar per week.

NCR 543  Reducing School Violence  Through Conflict Resolution  (3).

Prerequisites: NCR 504, NCR 507, NCR 508, NCR 522, and either NCR 525, NCR 527 or NCR 544.

Practical strategies to teach students to be peacemakers to reduce violence in schools. Discusses how schools can create cooperative learning environment where students learn how to negotiate and mediate peer conflicts and teachers use academic controversies to enhance learning.  Three hours of seminar per week.

NCR 544  Alternative Dispute Resolution Processes (3).

Prerequisites:  NCR 504, NCR 507, NCR 508, and NCR 522

Surveys a variety of process choices in dispute resolution.  Recognizing that litigation may not be appropriate in many cases.  Course examines alternatives such as negotiation, mini-trial, mediation, panel evaluation, summary jury trial, private judging, arbitration, and use of special masters.

NCR 545  Intercultural Conflict Resolution (3).

Prerequisites: NCR 504, NCR 507, NCR 508, NCR 522, and either NCR 525, NCR 527 or NCR 544.

Presents overview of intercultural communication negotiation and conflict resolution. Emphasizes understanding of values of intercultural as well as interreligious diversity in our increasingly interdependent world, nation and local communities. Encourages awareness of cultural perspective and socialization. Three hours of seminar.

NCR 591  Seminar:  NCR Capstone Course (3).

Prerequisites:  All required and elective courses.

Course is designed to enable students to demonstrate integration of knowledge of the field and critical and independent thinking.  Discussion of selected aspects of the negotiation, conflict resolution, and peacebuilding filed as they relate to the assigned readings.  CR/NC grading.  Repeatable for six units.

NCR 595  Seminar: Special Topics in Negotiation, Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding (1-3). 

Study of a current topic in Negotiation, Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding.  Repeatable for total of six units.  One to three hours of seminar per week.

NCR 597  Directed Reading in Negotiation, Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding  (3).

Prerequisites: NCR 504, NCR 507, NCR 508, and NCR 522.

In consultation with a faculty member, completion of readings to prepare for the comprehensive examination; or for orientation to a little known topic; or as background for writing a research, thesis, or project proposal.  CR/NC grading.  Repeatable for total of six units. 

NCR 598  Directed Research in Negotiation, Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding (3).

Prerequisites: NCR 504, NCR 507, NCR 508, and NCR 522.

Conduct of pilot studies, development of research instruments, or similar independent research in preparation for the project or thesis, under the supervision of a faculty member in any area of Negotiation, Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding.  CR/NC grading. 

NCR 599  Thesis or Project in Negotiation, Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding  (1-3).

Prerequisites: NCR 504, NCR 507, NCR 508, and NCR 522.

In consultation with a faculty member, writing of a masters thesis or completion of a project in Negotiation, Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding.  Choice of area requires prior consent of advisor.  CR/NC grading.

NCR 600 Graduate Continuation Course (0).

Graduate students who have completed their course work but not their thesis, project, or comprehensive examination, or who have other requirements remaining for the completion of their degree, may maintain continuous attendance by enrolling in this course.  Signature of graduate program director required.

 

BSN 301   Technology for the Information Age  (1).

Prerequisite:  BSN 310 is recommended.

Focuses on the impact of the information age on nursing education, research and practice.  Informatics as a discipline is introduced.  Access to a computer with modem, e-mail including a personal address and www capability is required.

BSN 305   Human Diversity and Health Care (4).

Prerequisite:  BSN 301 and BSN 310.

Uses cross cultural and family theory to explore forms of human diversity, including culture, gender, age, and family form.  Analyzes how human diversity affects health/illness dynamics, and how recognition of ethnocentrism and bias can help improve health care delivery. 

BSN 310   Professional Nursing Horizons (2). 

Prerequisite:  BSN 301 or  may be taken concurrently.

A systematic problem-solving approach which will help nurses assess potential roles and options, establish career goals, and identify resources which can guide them on a path toward fulfilling their own educational and professional goals.  CR/NC grading.

BSN 315   Life Cycle (3). 

Prerequisite:  BSN 301 and BSN 310.

Explores the biological, psychological, cognitive, and social aspects of human development throughout each stage of the life cycle.  Each unit is organized around the growth of the individual within the context of the family structure.

BSN 325   Complementary and Alternative Health Care Modalities (1).

Prerequisite:  BSN 301 and BSN 310 are required; BSN 305 is recommended.

Examines the role of traditional healers in the context of culture.  A n overview of some Eastern and Western approaches to healing is offered.  Students investigate through interviews, field trips, Internet and literature searches a variety of non-conventional therapies.

BSN 335   Biochemistry (4). 

Prerequisite:  BSN 301 and BSN 310.

Explores the principles underlying the chemistry of living systems and how the human organism meets vital needs.  It provides an introduction to the chemistry of bioenergetics, metabolism, biosynthesis, and molecular physiology.

BSN 340   Professional Collaboration in Nursing Practice (3).  

Prerequisite:  BSN 301 and BSN 310.

Examines communication skills critical to the practice of nursing, incorporating theoretical principles and applications.  Includes analysis of helping relationships with clients, as well as collaboration, networking, negotiation, and conflict resolution in interdisciplinary health care settings.

BSN 345   Pathophysiology (4).

Prerequisite:  BSN 301 and BSN 310.

Explores the response of the human body to illness and injury with respect to common disorders of the major physiologic systems.  Clinical correlations are provided to assist the health professional in applying this knowledge toward proposing therapeutic interventions.

BSN 380   Health Assessment (3). 

Prerequisite: BSN 301, BSN 345 is recommended. Co-requisite: BSN 381 is  recommended.

Provides the opportunity to gain basic knowledge and assessment skills required to perform a complete nursing health assessment of pediatric, adult, and geriatric patients.

BSN 381   Health Assessment Skills Seminar (1). 

Prerequisite: BSN 301. Co-requisite: BSN 380 is recommended.

Provides the opportunity for application of basic knowledge and the practice of skills related to performing a complete nursing health assessment of pediatric, adult, and geriatric patients.  Requires 16 hours of practice in a clinical laboratory. CR/NC grading.

BSN 400   Health Promotion and Teaching (3).

Prerequisite:  All BSN 300 level courses are required.

Explores the concepts of health promotion and interrelates them with health teaching process.  A variety of client situations and appropriate teaching strategies are considered.  Learning needs within health care institutions are investigated and program evaluation is addressed.

BSN 405   Statistics (3).

Prerequisites:  Fulfillment of the ELM requirement and intermediate algebra requirement. 

Satisfies the Quantitative Reasoning requirement.  Includes development and application of the following topics:  Descriptive and Inferential Statistics, Mathematics of Finance, Linear Programming and Graph Theory. 

BSN 410   Community Based Nursing I (3). 

Prerequisite:  All BSN 300 level courses are required; BSN 400 and BSN 405 are recommended.

Co-requisite:  BSN 411 is  recommended.

Explores the role of the home health care nurse within the context of the community.  Emphasizes the promotion and restoration of health, prevention of disease, and health teaching when providing care for individuals and families.

BSN 411   Home Health Role Performance (2). 

Prerequisite:  All BSN 300 level courses are required; BSN 400 and BSN 405 ; BSN 410 or concurrent enrollment.

Provides an opportunity for application of the knowledge and the practice of skills of the home health nurse in a community setting.  Requires 48 hours of clinical practice with a preceptor.  Includes a service-learning component.  CR/NC grading.

BSN 416   Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) in Health Care (1).

Prerequisite:  BSN 301 and BSN 310.

Focus on multidisciplinary perspective of health care quality management.  Introduction to case studies and discussions relating to statistical tools, approaches to operations management, organizational behavior, and CQI implementation in health care. CR/NC grading.

BSN 420   Community Based Nursing II (3). 

Prerequisite:  All BSN 300 level courses are required;  BSN 400, BSN 410 and BSN 460 are recommended.

Co-requisite:  BSN 421 is  recommended.

Explores dimensions of community health nursing from a community perspective and focuses on the “community as client” for health promotion, disease prevention, and risk reduction.  Examines epidemiological principles and evidence-based nursing interventions.

BSN 421   Public Health Role Performance (2).

Prerequisite:  All BSN 300 level courses are required; BSN 400 and BSN 405 ; BSN 420 or concurrent enrollment.

Provides an opportunity for application of the knowledge and the  skills of the public health nurse in a community setting.  Requires 48 hours of clinical practice with a preceptor.  CR/NC grading.

BSN 426   Nursing and Telehealth (2).

Prerequisite:  BSN 301 and BSN 310.

Explores the provision of health care by the multidisciplinary team to geographically remote clients through the use of sophisticated multiple technologies.  The role of the nurse in telehealth is examined in terms of professional preparation and practice considerations. CR/NC grading.

BSN 430   Health Care Systems, Policy and Finance (3).

Prerequisite:  All BSN 300 level courses are required;  BSN 400 and BSN 405 are recommended.

Overview of health policy generation, regulation and implementation.  Nursing is viewed as pivotal in promoting public health policy, advocating for nursing and health care reform and critically evaluating key outcomes of health care programs.  Financial models are critically examined.

BSN 436   Principles of Healthcare Budgeting (2).

Prerequisite:  BSN 301 and BSN 310.

Explores the basics of the healthcare budgeting process.  Cost concepts, forecasting, and variance analysis are reviewed.  Emphasis is centered on the operating budget and performance based budgeting.  Rationale for costing out nursing services is discussed.

BSN 440   Professional Nursing Roles (3).

Prerequisite:  All BSN 300 level courses are required;  BSN 400 may be taken concurrently.

The foundations of professional nursing practice from historical, philosophical, ethical, political, and legal perspectives are explored.  Significant issues are analyzed and strategies presented.  Diverse roles and settings for nursing practice are examined.  The relationship between theory, research, and nursing practice is analyzed.

BSN 446   Introduction to Nursing Case Management (2).

Prerequisite:  BSN 301 and BSN 310.

Explores the origins of case management and its relation to managed care.  Strategies and processes are analyzed.  Opportunities to examine real problems that arise in the nursing case manager role will be provided.

BSN 450   Nursing Leadership and Management (3). 

Prerequisite:  All BSN 300 level courses are required;  BSN 440 and BSN 460  are recommended.

Co-requisite:  BSN 430 and BSN 451 are recommended.

Focuses on theoretical principles to provide nurses with the knowledge base to be effective leaders/managers in today’s healthcare environment.  Discusses topics such as strategic planning, power, advocacy, collaboration and resource management.

BSN 451   Leadership and Management Role Performance (3). 

Prerequisite:  All BSN 300 level courses are required;  BSN 450 or concurrent enrollment: BSN 430, 440 and 460  are recommended.

Provides an opportunity for application of the knowledge and skills of the role of the nurse manager/leader in an administrative setting.  Requires 48 hours of clinical practice with a preceptor.  CR/NC grading.

BSN 456   Health and the Global Village (1).

Prerequisite:  BSN 301 and BSN 310.

Investigates international health, focusing on developing countries and the effect of globalization on world health.  The potential of telehealth is considered.  Characteristics of the successful international practitioner are discussed and professional opportunities abroad are explored. CR/NC grading.

BSN 460   Nursing Research Utilization (3). 

Prerequisite:  BSN 301 and BSN 310 are required;  BSN 405 may be taken concurrently.

Examines scientific clinical nursing rationale for research utilization and theory-based practice.  Concepts of research methods, processes, analyze relevant nursing problems for clinical effective practice.

BSN 494   Independent Study (1-3). 

A course of study designed cooperatively by student and instructor, and approved by the Program Director, to accomplish individualized learning objectives that are appropriate to the role of the professional nurse.  (Students should contact their advisor prior to enrolling to determine the appropriateness of this course for degree completion.)

BSN 495  Special Topics/Colloquia (1-3). 

Theses courses offer student groups an opportunity to explore a topic of current interest to the nursing profession with colleagues, faculty and special guest speakers.  CR/NC grading.

 

MSN 501  Nursing Informatics (1). 

Contribution of nursing informatics to advanced roles, including relationships among critical thinking, computer literacy, information literacy, and nursing informatics is examined.  Exercises in data/information management applied to nursing research, theory, and advanced role evaluated.

MSN 504  Advanced Nursing Roles (2).

Prerequisite:  MSN 501 or concurrent enrollment.

This course will facilitate transition into advanced nursing roles.  The requirements for and the regulation of advanced roles, including dealing with role ambiguity and changing role boundaries will be explored.  Participation in the profession and exertion of leadership in the profession and the health care system will be examined.

MSN 510  Theories for Advanced Nursing Roles (3). 

Prerequisite:  MSN 501 or concurrent enrollment.

Focuses on the use of nursing theory in advanced nursing roles in response to health related human phenomena in diverse settings.  The evolution of nursing models and theories is explored including history, philosophy of science, and utilization.

MSN 513  Health Care Policy/Economics (3).

Prerequisite:  MSN 501 concurrent enrollment.

Explores characteristics of the current healthcare environment as it pertains to policy development, health planning, and economic management at the national, state and local levels.  Multidisciplinary decisions regarding equitable distribution of existing resources, policy development, program evaluation, and client/population outcomes will be explored.

MSN 514  Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (3).

Prerequisite:  MSN 501 or concurrent enrollment.

Examines traditional and alternative theoretical and conceptual bases of wellness from the perspective of nursing and health.  Focus is on assessment, diagnosis, intervention and outcome evaluation of wellness and disease prevention needs and issues encountered in advanced nursing roles.

MSN 521  Nurse Educator:  Theory (4). 

Prerequisites:  MSN 501, MSN 504, MSN 510, MSN 513, MSN 514, MSN 530, MSN 535, and MSN 523 or MSN 533.  Concurrent enrollment in MSN 591 is required.

Examines the role of nurse educator in community academic and agency settings.  Curriculum development is analyzed, synthesized, and evaluated.  Emphasis on transforming a curricular framework into instructional design reflecting current learning theory, technology, and healthcare systems.

MSN 522  Nurse Administrator:  Theory (4). 

Prerequisites:  MSN 501, MSN 504, MSN 510, MSN 513, MSN 514, MSN 530, MSN 535.  Concurrent enrollment in MSN 591 is required.

This course examines the evolution and contemporary status of the role of the nursing service administrator  within complex systems. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the management of primary organizational, financial and human resources.  The utilization of information science and technology will be applied to key managerial functions.  Selected conceptual tools will be analyzed for application to leadership roles in nursing care system management.

MSN 523  Family Assessment:  Theory and Practice (3).

Prerequisites:  MSN 501, MSN 504, MSN 510, MSN 513, MSN 514, MSN 530, MSN 535 ; MSN 526, 527 and 528 can be taken concurrently with instructor permission.  Corequisite: MSN 541 for PC Role Option Students.

Focuses on the theoretical underpinnings specific to the biopsychosocial and developmental aspects of the family during the childbearing and childrearing years.  Examines the conceptual basis of advanced practice nursing within the context of family assessment, interventions and strategies.  Places emphasis on the family unit within a culturally diverse environment.

MSN 525  Theoretical Foundations of CNS Parent-Child Nursing (3).

Prerequisites:  MSN 523, MSN 526, MSN 527, MSN 528, and MSN 541. Corerequisite:  MSN 542.

Focuses on the theoretical foundations of healthcare delivery to childbearing and childrearing families within the context of the Clinical Nurse Specialist role.  Emphasizes the conceptual basis of advanced practice in response to health, illness, interventions and evaluation of families.  Gives attention to conditions involving genetics, neuropsychological, social and environmental alterations in a culturally diverse environment.  Delineates CNS practice guidelines specific to the childbearing/childrearing period.

MSN 526  Pharmacology (3).  

Prerequisites:  MSN 501, MSN 504, MSN 510, MSN 513, MSN 514, MSN 530, MSN 535 or permission of Chair.

Examines theoretical basis for pharmacological treatment of common health problems.  Selected classification of drugs will be discussed with emphasis on pharmacokinetic principles, pathophysiological basis for therapeutic use, adverse effects, drug interactions, contraindications for use, patient education and issue of compliance. 

MSN 527  Advanced Health Assessment (3). 

Prerequisites:  MSN 501, MSN 504, MSN 510, MSN 513, MSN 514, MSN 530, MSN 535 or permission of Chair.

Examines theory and practice of advanced health assessment, and application to the advanced practice role.  Emphasizes analysis and synthesis of subjective and objective data to identify health problems and develop management plans.  Health promotion, risk factor identification, and recognition of common abnormalities in advanced practice are explored.

BSN 528   Advanced Pathophysiology (3). 

Prerequisite:  Upper-division undergraduate Pathophysiology course.

Focuses on application of advanced knowledge of the complex physiological functions and pathophysiological processes related to the care of individuals with healthcare problems.  Discusses alterations in function, and adaptive, integrative and regulatory mechanisms at the molecular, cellular, organ and system levels.

MSN 530  Research Utilization in Advanced Nursing Practice (3). 

Prerequisite:  MSN 501 or concurrent enrollment.

Prepares the nurse to critique and apply research findings in nursing practice.  Critical thinking is related to problem identification, assessment of data, and outcome evaluation.  Research methodologies, including qualitative and quantitative approaches, are examined and related to nursing informatics.

MSN 533  Theoretical Aspects of Aging (3).

Prerequisites:  MSN core courses; MSN 526, MSN 527 and MSN 528 may be taken concurrently. Corequisite:  MSN 544.

Focuses on the aging population as a whole; demographics; theories of aging of the individual, in a family unit, in relation to caregivers, and ethnicity.  Addresses the expected changes, normal and abnormal, of the aging process.  Analyzes the many assessment needs of elders.  Explores frameworks and standards of care, and patient outcomes.

MSN 534  Healthcare Needs of Complex Aging Patients (3).

Prerequisites:  MSN 533, MSN 544. Corequisite:  MSN 545.

Focuses on advanced practice care of the complex aging patient in regard to health promotion, disease prevention, mental health issues, and neurological impairments.  Develops a conceptual framework for studying health conditions in the aging population at large, and in a specific target population selected by the student.

MSN 535  Ethics in Advanced Nursing Roles  (2). 

Prerequisite:  MSN 501 or concurrent enrollment.

Examines the theoretical/conceptual bases of ethics from a nursing perspective.  Focus is on the analysis, synthesis, and resolution of ethical issues encountered in advanced nursing roles.  Ethical relationships among nursing theory, research, and practice in healthcare delivery to a diverse population are explored.

MSN 536  Nursing Clinical Case Management Across the Health Care Continuum (3). 

Prerequisite:  MSN 501 or concurrent enrollment; MSN 504 is recommended.

The role of the nurse case manager, benefits of case management, and high risk populations across the healthcare continuum are identified.  A model for case management will be developed, implementation strategies will be discussed, and evaluation procedures will be identified. 

MSN 537  Gerontology for Nurses (3). 

Prerequisite:  MSN 501 and MSN 504.

Focuses on the health care delivery system and public policies that affect older adults.  Theory and current research associated with common clinical problems and therapeutic nursing interventions are examined.  Nursing care of at risk groups is emphasized.

MSN 541  Parent-Child CNS Role Performance I (3).

Prerequisites:  MSN 526, MSN 527 and MSN 528; Corequisite: MSN 523.

Emphasizes beginning mastery of specialized nursing practice.   Focuses on the roles of the Parent-Child CNS.  Affords an opportunity for comprehensive assessments and advanced clinical care with child bearing/rearing families within an interdisciplinary context.  Requires 144 hours of supervised practice with a preceptor.  CR/NC grading.

MSN 542  Parent-Child CNS Role Performance II (4).

Prerequisites: MSN 523 and MSN 541.  Corequisite: MSN 525.

Continues mastery of specialized nursing practice and the application of assessment and intervention principles.  Affords an opportunity for in-depth assessments; addresses patient-centered healthcare issues; and incorporates research findings in parent-child nursing practice.  Requires 196 hours of supervised practice with a preceptor. CR/NC grading.

MSN 543  Parent-Child CNS Role Performance III (3).

Prerequisites: MSN 525 and MSN 542.

Continues in-depth study of healthcare issues in a selected population with attention to cost-effective interventions to improve patient outcomes.  Incorporates promotion of wellness, innovation and evaluation of practice, and interdisciplinary collaboration.  Requires 144 hours of supervised practice with a preceptor. CR/NC grading.

MSN 544  Gerontology:  CNS Role Performance I (3).

Prerequisite: MSN courses, MSN 526, MSN 527, and MSN 528 may be taken concurrently.  Corequisite: MSN 533.

Emphasizes beginning mastery of specialized advanced nursing practice.  Focuses on health needs, health promotion and disease prevention in the care of complex elderly patients.  Provides an opportunity to identify a patient-centered issue for continued research.  Requires 144 clinical hours of supervised practice with a preceptor.  CR/NC grading.

MSN 545  Gerontology CNS Role Performance II (4).

Prerequisites:  MSN 533 and MSN 544.  Corequisite:  MSN 534.

Focuses on using the "best practice" model, and considers its relevance in clinical care and research within a healthcare organization.  Provides a context for integrating community, resources and life space options for a selected group of elders with complex needs.  Requires 196 clinical hours of supervised practice with a preceptor.  CR/NC grading.

MSN 546  Gerontology CNS Role Performance III (3).

Prerequisites:  MSN 534 and MSN 535.

Focuses on advanced nursing practice and integration of the components of the Gerontology CNS role; clinical expertise, education, research, consultation and clinical leadership in a practice setting.  Requires 144 clinical hours of supervised practice with a preceptor.  CR/NC grading.

MSN 551  Nurse Educator:  Role Performance I (2).

Prerequisite:  MSN 521.  Concurrent enrollment in MSN 592 is required.

A previously selected nursing clinical focus provides the basis for implementing the institution or health care setting.  Under the supervision of an instructor and a preceptor, the student will apply and evaluate didactic and clinical teaching concepts and strategies. CR/NC grading.

MSN 552  Nurse Administrator:  Role Performance I (2). 

Prerequisite:  MSN 522.  Concurrent enrollment in MSN 592 is required.

An opportunity for the student to initiate the nurse administrator role in a selected health care setting, focusing on a change project.  Under the supervision of an instructor and a preceptor, the student will formulate, implement and evaluate a change plan based on a conceptual nursing model. CR/NC grading.

MSN 555  Quality Improvement in Health Care (3).  

Prerequisite:  MSN 501.

Explores the historical evolution of quality initiatives in health care and defines current concepts in quality assessment and improvement.  Organizational performance, outcomes assessment, management and effectiveness, and the role of the advanced practice nurse are emphasized.

MSN 556  Primary Care of the Family I (4). 

Prerequisite:  MSN 526, MSN 527 or permission of Chair.  Concurrent enrollment in MSN 591 is required.

Examines theoretical basis for pharmacological treatment of common health problems.  Emphasis will be placed on comprehensive assessment and management of common acute health problems seen in the care of clients across the life span.

MSN 557  Primary Care of the Family I:  Role Performance (4). 

Prerequisites:  MSN 526, MSN 527 or permission of Chair.  Concurrent enrollment in MSN 591 is required.

Provides a preceptored supervised clinical experience with an emphasis on comprehensive assessment and management of common health problems seen in the primary care of clients across the life span.  Emphasis will be placed on the primary care of the individual and family within a culturally diverse environment.  CR/NC  grading.

MSN 561  Nurse Educator:  Role Performance II (2). 

Prerequisite:  MSN 551.  Concurrent enrollment in MSN 592 is required.

Under the supervision of an instructor and preceptor, the student demonstrates advanced clinical knowledge and competency with a selected client population.  Opportunity is provided to apply clinical knowledge and skill to a teaching situation.  CR/NC grading.

MSN 562  Nurse Administrator:  Role Performance II (2). 

Prerequisite:  MSN 552.  Concurrent enrollment in MSN 592 is required.

An opportunity for the student to initiate the nurse administrator role in a selected health care setting, focusing on forces shaping the role of a nurse administrator in departmental and institutional governance. Under the supervision of an  instructor and a preceptor, the student will apply valid and reliable measures of performance evaluation to nurse administrator performance and organizational performance.  CR/NC grading.

MSN 566  Primary Care of the Family II (4).

Prerequisite:  MSN 556, MSN 557 or permission of Chair.  Concurrent enrollment in MSN 592 is required.

Examines theoretical and conceptual basis for advanced practice as a Family Nurse Practitioner.  Emphasis is on comprehensive assessment and management of common chronic health problems. 

MSN 567  Primary Care of the Family II:  Role Performance (4). 

Prerequisites:  MSN 556, MSN 557 or permission of Chair.  Concurrent enrollment in MSN 592 is required.

Provides a preceptored supervised clinical experience emphasizing comprehensive assessment and management of common acute and chronic health problems across the life span.  Emphasis placed on primary care of individual and family in a culturally diverse environment. CR/NC grading.

MSN 571  Nurse Educator:  Performance III (2). 

Prerequisite:  MSN 561.  Concurrent enrollment in MSN 592 is required.

An opportunity for the student to synthesize knowledge and skill from previous graduate theory and clinical course work toward the full realization of the nurse educator role in a selected educational institution or health care setting, including participation in governance.  CR/NC grading.

MSN 572  Nurse Administrator:  Role Performance III (2). 

Prerequisite:  MSN 562.  Concurrent enrollment in MSN 592 is required. 

An opportunity for the student to initiate the nurse administrator role in a selected health care setting, focusing on professional and regulatory requirements. Under the supervision of an instructor and a preceptor, the student will formulate a nursing service plan for integrating quality measures with cost control and case management practice. CR/NC grading.

MSN 576  Primary Care of the Family III (4).  

Prerequisite:  MSN 566, MSN 567 or permission of Chair. 

Examines theoretical and conceptual basis for advanced practice as Family Nurse Practitioner.  Emphasis is on comprehensive assessment and management of increasingly complex acute and chronic health problems across the life span for culturally diverse individuals and families. 

MSN 577  Primary Care of the Family III:  Role Performance (4).  

Prerequisites:  MSN 566, MSN 567 or permission of Chair.