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Summary of Changes

Graduation Requirements

  • Item #5- Time limit to complete HUX program changed from 7 years to 5 years.

New Course

  • HUX 595 Special Topics in the Humanities (3)

Humanities
External Degree

College of Extended and International Education

Master of Arts

Faculty

Patricia Cherin, Program Coordinator

     The following is a partial listing of instructors who work most often with the program. (Although most are full-time faculty in on-campus departments, we also utilize the talents of part-time and emeritus faculty.) Their years of experience and expertise teaching both on campus and through the humanities special sessions degree program make them an invaluable source of knowledge.

R. Iset Anuakan (History), Debra Best (Literature) Kimberly Bohman-Kalaja (Literature), David Bradfield (Music), Anita Chang (Music), David Churchman (Behavioral Sciences), Marie Connors (Literature), William Cumiford (Philosophy), Miguel Dominguez (Modern Languages), Myrna C. Donahoe (Interdisciplinary Studies), Kirsten Ellsworth (Art), Bryan Feuer (Humanities), Kate Gale (Literature), Patricia B. Gamon (Art), Jonathon Grasse (Music), Daniel Greenspan (Philosophy), Judson Grenier (History), William Hagan (Philosophy), Arthur Harshman (Art), Gilah Y. Hirsch (Art), Howard Holter (History), Fumiko Hosokawa (Sociology), James Jeffers (History and Interdisciplinary Studies), Kathryn Kendzora (Literature), Kenneth Lee (Philosophy), Ben Mijuskovic (Philosophy), Christopher Monty (History), Joanna Nachef (Music), Helen Oesterheld (Literature), Linda Pomerantz (History), Abe C. Ravitz (Literature), Porfirio Sanchez (Modern Languages), Jacqueline Shannon (Music), Lyle E. Smith (Literature), Frances J. Steiner (Music), Frank A. Stricker (History), John Swain, (Theatre Arts), S. Glen White (Art), Joanne J. Zitelli (Literature)

Nichole Ballard, Student Services Professional

Lisa Ayres, Program Associate

Program Office: SAC 2-2126, (310) 243-3743 FAX: (310) 516-4399

Program Description

The Master of Arts in Humanities offers a broad interdisciplinary exposure to all of the areas of the humanities - history, literature, philosophy, music and art - and the establishment of an integrative perspective among them, with emphasis on their interrelating effects and influences. Students are provided with the opportunity to specialize in a particular discipline of the humanities, or in specific thematic areas which could be traced across all of the humanistic disciplines. The degree is offered entirely on an external degree basis; this means that there is no residency requirement and that students can complete all of the course work without coming on campus. This kind of master's program is best for students who are unable to regularly attend classes on campus and/or those who prefer an individualized approach to advanced education and can study independently. Courses are offered in fall, spring and summer trimesters of 14 weeks each.

Preparation

A B.A. or B.S. degree from a regionally accredited college or university with a grade point average of 3.0 is required for acceptance into the M.A. program.  Conditional admission with a grade point average of 2.5 can be considered under exceptional circumstances.

Features

The Humanities External Master's Degree program offers a fully accredited degree with no classroom attendance. The master's degree is earned by completing courses predesigned and packaged by CSU Dominguez Hills humanities professors and by students designing and completing their own faculty-guided independent studies. The program now includes a computer-based course instruction option for some courses. Since the Humanities External Degree program is self-supporting, there is a per semester unit tuition fee charged regardless of residence.

The Humanities External Degree program has been in existence since 1974 and has had students residing in all 50 states as well as many foreign countries. We have truly been performing the function of the university "without walls."

Master of Arts in Humanities (30 units)

Admission Requirements

1.  B.A. or B.S. degree from a regionally accredited college or university, not necessarily in the humanities.

2.  A 3.00 grade point average or better in the last 60 semester (90 quarter) units of upper division course work attempted, excluding lower division work completed after obtaining the bachelor's degree.

Admission Procedures

1.  Apply through CSU Mentor and pay the $55.00 non-refundable application fee online through our website:  www.csudh.edu/hux/.

2.  Send to the HUX program office the required essay and two unopened official transcripts from each college or university previously attended.  If transcripts are not sent along with the essay, they may be sent separately directly from other institutions to the Humanities External Degree Program.

  Mailing address:
Humanities External Degree - Application Materials
California State University, Dominguez Hills
1000 E. Victoria Street - SAC 2-2126                               
Carson, CA 90747

3.  During the first two trimesters after admission, students will be required to pass the Graduate Writing Examination (GWE) with a score of eight or better. This exam may be repeated once.

Graduation Requirements

1.  A minimum of 30 semester units, completing either Curriculum A or Curriculum B.

2.  Not less than 21 semester units completed in the program. At the discretion of the program coordinator, a maximum of nine semester units of applicable graduate work may be transferred into the program.

3.  An overall grade point average of 3.00 or better.

4.  Passing grade on the Humanities Master of Arts "Advancement to Candidacy" Examination, which is taken after 16 semester units in the program have been completed.

5.  All course work taken in the master's degree program must be completed within the five academic years immediately preceding the date of graduation. Outdated course work completed no more than seven academic years immediately preceding the date of graduation is eligible for validation. Validation of outdated course work may be requested from the University Graduate Studies Office through the HUX Program Coordinator. The request must be accompanied by a Petition for Outdated Coursework Validation for Graduate Program from the program Coordinator that verifies that the student has demonstrated relevant knowledge/skills via an approved method of validation, such as written work or examination.

6.  In addition to the major requirements, students must meet all university requirements for the master's degree. Students should consult the section of the catalog entitled "Graduate Degrees and Postbaccalaureate Studies."

Requirements for Curriculum A (30 units)

Curriculum A is divided into three phases and is designed for the student who desires to pursue an integrative study of the Humanities at the graduate level. It allows for specialization in an interdisciplinary theme rather than in a single discipline, and it seeks to provide a student with a broad exposure to all areas of the Humanities. Courses in Phases I must be taken before Phase II courses.  Both Phases I and II must be completed before beginning work in Phase III. Consult the Course Descriptions for prerequisites.

A.  Phase I: Defining the Humanities Seminars (10 units):

HUX 501. Defining the Humanities: History (2)

HUX 502. Defining the Humanities: Literature (2)

HUX 503. Defining the Humanities: Music (2)

HUX 504. Defining the Humanities: Art (2)

HUX 505. Defining the Humanities: Philosophy (2)

 

B.  Phase II: Studies in the Humanities (15-18 units)

1.  Category 1: Interdisciplinary Courses: Select three courses from the following (9 units):

HUX 530. War and Human Experience (3)

HUX 532. Slavery in History and Literature (3)

HUX 540. Evolution of Human Culture (3)

HUX 541. The Rational Perspective (3)

HUX 542. The Para-Rational Perspective (3)

HUX 543. The Autonomous Individual (3)

HUX 544. The Individual and Society (3)

HUX 545. The Non-Western World (3)

HUX 546. Alienation, Estrangement and Subcultures (3)

HUX 547. World Religious Perspectives (3)

HUX 548. Values and Morality in Twentieth Century Thought (3)

HUX 594. Independent Study: Interdisciplinary Topics (3)

2.  Category 2: Disciplinary Courses: Select two or three courses from the following in different disciplines (6-9 units):

HUX 550. Key Individuals, Art: Frank Lloyd Wright (3)

HUX 551. Key Individuals, Music: Beethoven (3)

HUX 552. Key Individuals, Philosophy: Rousseau (3)

HUX 553. Key Individuals, Literature: Hemingway & Faulkner (3)

HUX 554. Key Individuals, History: Carnegie, Rockefeller, & Ford (3)

HUX 555. Key Individuals, History: Stalin (3)

HUX 556. Nobel Laureates: Studies in Modern World Literature (3)

HUX 557. Key Periods and Movements, Philosophy: Greeks: Philosophy, Tragedy and the Polis (3)

HUX 570. Key Periods and Movements, Art: Contemporary Art (3)

HUX 571. Key Periods and Movements, Music: Baroque (3)

HUX 572. Key Periods and Movements, Philosophy: The Biblical Movement (3)

HUX 573. Key Periods and Movements, Literature: Archetypal Criticism (3)

HUX 574. Key Periods and Movements, History: The Age of Revolution (3)

HUX 575. Key Periods and Movements, Literature: Nineteenth Century American Literature (3)

HUX 576. Key Periods and Movements, Art: Ancient Maya (3)

HUX 578. Key Periods and Movements, Literature: Female Coming of Age in World Literature (3)

HUX 579. The Arab World: 600 A.D. to the Present (3)

HUX 580. Ancient Near East (3)

HUX 581. Key Periods and Movements, Philosophy: Philosophy and Postmodernism (3)

HUX 594. Independent Study: Literature (3)

HUX 594. Independent Study: History (3)

HUX 594. Independent Study: Philosophy (3)

HUX 594. Independent Study: Music (3)

HUX 594. Independent Study: Art (3)

 

C. Phase III: Final Project (5-6 units):

1.  HUX 598. Final Project Proposal (1)

HUX 599. Final Project: Thesis (4-5) or

HUX 599. Final Project: Creative Project (4-5)

 

D. Electives: These units may include courses in the Humanities Encounters series (HUX 521-524), with permission of the program coordinator.

Requirements for Curriculum B (30 units)

Curriculum B is divided into three phases and is designed for the student who wants to study humanities with specialization in one of five disciplines: art, history, literature, philosophy or music. Courses in Phases I must be taken before Phase II courses.  Both Phases I and II must be completed before beginning work in Phase III. Consult the course description for prerequisites.

Creative Study

Students wishing to pursue a creative curriculum in which the final project includes a creative work (art, literature, or music) in addition to the scholarly discussion should contact the Academic Coordinator early in the program. Samples of creative work will be required for review by appropriate HUX faculty. If approved for a creative curriculum, the student will take at least one course in art, literature or music, and up to three independent studies for creative work in the same discipline.

A.  Phase I: Defining the Humanities Seminars: Select three courses from the following (6 units):

HUX 501. Defining the Humanities: History (2)

HUX 502. Defining the Humanities: Literature (2)

HUX 503. Defining the Humanities: Music (2)

HUX 504. Defining the Humanities: Art (2)

HUX 505. Defining the Humanities: Philosophy (2)

 

B.  Phase II: Studies in the Humanities with a Single Discipline
Emphasis (18-21 units)

1.  Category 1: Study in a Single Discipline: Select 4 courses from the following in the same discipline (12 units):

HUX 550. Key Individuals, Art: Frank Lloyd Wright (3)

HUX 551. Key Individuals, Music: Beethoven (3)

HUX 552. Key Individuals, Philosophy: Rousseau (3)

HUX 553. Key Individuals, Literature: Hemingway & Faulkner (3)

HUX 554. Key Individuals, History: Carnegie, Rockefeller & Ford (3)

HUX 555. Key Individuals, History: Stalin (3)

HUX 556. Nobel Laureates: Studies in Modern World Literature (3)

HUX 557. Key Periods and Movements, Philosophy: Greeks: Philosophy, Tragedy and the Polis (3)

HUX 570. Key Periods and Movements, Art: Contemporary Art (3)

HUX 571. Key Periods and Movements, Music: Baroque (3)

HUX 572. Key Periods and Movements, Philosophy: The Biblical Movement (3)

HUX 573. Key Periods and Movements, Literature: Archetypal Criticism (3)

HUX 574. Key Periods and Movements, History: The Age of Revolution (3)

HUX 575. Key Periods and Movements, Literature: Nineteenth Century American Literature (3)

HUX 576. Key Periods and Movements, Art: Ancient Maya (3)

HUX 578. Key Periods and Movements, Literature: Female Coming of Age in World Literature (3)

HUX 579. The Arab World: 600 A.D. to the Present (3)

HUX 580. Ancient Near East (3)

HUX 581. Key Periods and Movements, Philosophy: Philosophy and Postmodernism (3)

HUX 594. Independent Study: Literature (3)

HUX 594. Independent Study: History (3)

HUX 594. Independent Study: Philosophy (3)

HUX 594. Independent Study: Music (3)

HUX 594. Independent Study: Art (3)

2.  Category 2: Study in Related Disciplines: Select two or three courses from the following in at least two disciplines different from the major discipline (6-9 units):

HUX 530. War and Human Experience (3)

HUX 532. Slavery in History and Literature (3)

HUX 540. Evolution of Human Culture (3)

HUX 541. The Rational Perspective (3)

HUX 542. The Para-Rational Perspective (3)

HUX 543. The Autonomous Individual (3)

HUX 544. The Individual and Society (3)

HUX 545. Non-Western World (3)

HUX 546. Alienation, Estrangement and Subcultures (3)

HUX 547. World Religious Perspectives (3)

HUX 548. Values and Morality in 20th Century Thought (3)

HUX 550. Key Individuals, Art: Frank Lloyd Wright (3)

HUX 551. Key Individuals, Music: Beethoven (3)

HUX 552. Key Individuals, Philosophy: Rousseau (3)

HUX 553. Key Individuals, Literature: Hemingway & Faulkner (3)

HUX 554. Key Individuals, History: Carnegie, Rockefeller & Ford (3)

HUX 555. Key Individuals, History: Stalin (3)

HUX 556. Nobel Laureates: Studies in Modern World Literature (3)

HUX 557 Key Periods and Movements, Philosophy: Greeks: Philosophy, Tragedy and the Polis (3).

HUX 570. Key Periods and Movements, Art: Contemporary Art (3)

HUX 571. Key Periods and Movements, Music: Baroque (3)

HUX 572. Key Periods and Movements, Philosophy: The Biblical Movement (3)

HUX 573. Key Periods and Movements, Literature: Archetypal Criticism (3)

HUX 574. Key Periods and Movements, History: The Age of Revolution (3)

HUX 575. Key Periods and Movements, Literature: Nineteenth Century American Literature (3)

HUX 576. Key Periods and Movements, Art: Ancient Maya (3)

HUX 578. Key Periods and Movements, Literature: Female Coming of Age in World Literature (3)

HUX 579. The Arab World: 600 A.D. to the Present (3)

HUX 581. Key Periods and Movements, Philosophy: Philosophy and Postmodernism (3)

HUX 594. Independent Study: Literature (3)

HUX 594. Independent Study: History (3)

HUX 594. Independent Study: Philosophy (3)

HUX 594. Independent Study: Music (3)

HUX 594. Independent Study: Art (3)

HUX 594. Independent Study: Interdisciplinary Topics (3)

 

C. Phase III: Final Project (5-6 units)

1.  HUX 598. Final Project Proposal (1)

HUX 599. Final Project: Thesis (4-5)

HUX 599. Final Project: Creative Project (4-5)

 

D. Electives: These units may include courses in the Humanities Encounters series (HUX 521-524), with permission of the program coordinator.

Course Offerings

The credit value for each course in semester units is indicated for each term by a number in parentheses following the title. For more information on the specific terms in which these courses may be offered, please visit the MA in Humanities External Degree website at www.csudh.edu/hux.

Upper Division

HUX 345         The Non-Western World: China and Japan (3).

Interdisciplinary study of the non-western world by focusing on some of the art, philosophy and music of China and Japan .

HUX 346         Alienation, Estrangement, and Subcultures (3).

Survey of the elements and historical implications of alienation. Examination of Hispanic and African American cultures.

HUX 347         Images of Humanity: World Religious Perspectives (3).

Survey of ancient and modern religious systems focusing upon general characteristics of religious belief.

Graduate

Graduate standing or consent of the graduate program coordinator is prerequisite to enrollment in graduate (500 level) courses.

Introductory Courses

HUX 501         Defining the Humanities: History (2).

Advanced study of the nature of history through examination of the historiographic method.

HUX 502         Defining the Humanities: Literature (2).

Advanced study of the nature of literature by examination of images of self in selected poems and novels.

HUX 503         Defining the Humanities: Music (2).

Advanced study of music, focusing on concepts of meaning and form in music at a philosophical rather than theoretical level. The ability to read music not required.

HUX 504         Defining the Humanities: Art (2).

Advanced study of key concepts in art by focusing on aesthetics and art theory.

HUX 505         Defining the Humanities: Philosophy (2).

Advanced study of key concepts of Philosophy by focusing on contemporary issues and conflicts and their analogues in traditional philosophical readings.

Elective Courses

HUX 521         Humanities Encounter: The Living Theatre (3).

How to recognize, appreciate and evaluate a variety of dramatic experiences. Requires extensive notebook of descriptions and analyses of five different types of theatrical performances. Three additional theatrical encounter descriptions and analyses required.

HUX 522         Humanities Encounter: Concert Music (3).

Attendance and analysis of several concerts representing the general categories of symphonic, vocal and chamber music. Critical reviews required for each of four musical encounters. Reviews of two additional musical encounters required.

HUX 523         Humanities Encounter: Historical Sites (3).

Exploring the historical roots of one's own community. Requires papers (including photographs) involving descriptions and analyses of three different historical sites. Papers on two additional sites required.

HUX 524         Humanities Encounter: Film (3).

Watching and analyzing several films with special focus on the techniques and content of the medium. Requires extensive notebook of descriptions and analyses of five different film experiences. Three additional film experience descriptions and analyses required.

Interdisciplinary Courses

HUX 530         War and Human Experience (3).

 Prerequisite: HUX 501 is recommended.

An examination, through readings in history and literature, of the nature of war and its effect on individuals, families, groups and communities. The course will draw on a wide range of examples, including conflicts in the ancient world, modern Europe and the United States .

HUX 532         Slavery in History and Literature (3).

 Prerequisite: HUX 501.

Examines the institution of slavery from an interdisciplinary humanistic perspective utilizing a comparative approach. Surveys slavery from ancient times to the present in all parts of the world, with focus upon American slavery.

HUX 540         Evolution of Human Culture: Western Civilization (3).

An examination of the nature of change and cultural unfolding, using the development of the city as a key concept, and looking into three representative types of cities: ancient, medieval and modern.

HUX 541         The Rational Perspective (3).

The meaning of rationality from the perspectives of philosophy, history, literature, music, and art. Special emphasis on the possible differences between scientific and humanistic rationality.

HUX 542         The Para-rational Perspective (3).

Interdisciplinary exploration of non-rational alternatives in modern culture, focusing on the nonlogical, the visionary, and the religious/mystical.

HUX 543         The Autonomous Individual (3).

Interdisciplinary study of the nature of the creative act, including the following: the artist's vision of self; the defenses of personalism; notions of aesthetics and of symbolic thought.

HUX 544         The Individual and Society (3).

Exploration of the position of the individual in the classic and modern models of social and political organization; conservatism, liberalism, socialism, anarchism; study of the Utopian tradition; and study of aesthetic theories that connect the artist with society.

HUX 545         The Non-Western World (3).

Interdisciplinary examination of the non-western world by focusing on cultural characteristics of China and Japan .

HUX 546         Alienation, Estrangement and Subcultures (3).

A survey of the elements and historical implications of alienation and examination of subcultures as they exist in America . Readings from social Philosophy as well as from Chicano and African American studies.

HUX 547         World Religious Perspectives (3).

A survey of ancient and modern religious systems, focusing upon an exploration of the general characteristics of religious beliefs.

HUX 548         Values and Morality in Twentieth Century Thought (3).

An examination of values and morality in modern culture against a backdrop of seemingly amoral scientific and technological progress.

Disciplinary: Individuals

HUX 550         Key Individuals, Art: Frank Lloyd Wright (3).

Intensive study of the buildings and architectural influence of Frank Lloyd Wright.

HUX 551         Key Individuals, Music: Beethoven (3).

An examination of the life and music of Ludwig Van Beethoven; the ability to read music not required.

HUX 552         Key Individuals, Philosophy: Rousseau (3).

An examination of the life, thought, and influence of Rousseau, focusing on several recurrent themes: Self-other, rational-nonrational, classic-romantic, dependence-independence, democracy-totalitarianism.

HUX 553         Key Individuals, Literature: Hemingway and Faulkner (3).

An examination of the major works and influence of two modern American authors, Ernest Hemingway and William Faulkner.

HUX 554         Key Individuals, History: Carnegie, Rockefeller and Ford (3).

Rise of American Industrial capitalism, viewed through the activities of three business giants, and the course of American economic history to the present, with special emphasis on World War I and the Great Depression.

HUX 555         Key Individuals, History: Stalin (3).

Prerequisite: HUX 501 is recommended.

Stalin was arguably the most powerful and effective leader in history, whose influence will be felt for ages to come. Examines Stalin the person through a biography; his effect upon the people, through a novel; and his place in history as interpreted today.

HUX 556         Nobel Laureates: Studies in Modern World Literature (3).

Examination of representative major works by recent Nobel Laureates whose art epitomizes diverse cultural, literary, and social viewpoints. Authors include Mann, Pirandello, Camus, Kawabata, Solzhenitsyn, Neruda and Bellow.

Disciplinary: Periods and Movements

HUX 557         Key Periods and Movements, Philosophy: Greeks: Philosophy,
Tragedy and the Polis (3).

Prerequisite: HUX 505.

An examination of the emergence of philosophy out of the "mythical" thinking that precedes and continues within it. How classical Greek philosophy contrasted with Greek tragic poetry.

HUX 570         Key Periods and Movements, Art: Contemporary (3).

Exploration of the complex cultural development known as modern art by investigation of six major artistic movements: Cubism, Expressionism, Dada/Surrealism, Pop Art, Conceptual Art and Technological Art.

HUX 571         Key Periods and Movements, Music: Baroque (3).

Examination of Baroque music and the period in Western Europe (1600-1750) during which it evolved. The ability to read music not required.

HUX 572         Key Periods and Movements, Philosophy: The Biblical Movement (3).

Examination of modern scholarship on the Bible and its impact on Christianity; analysis of 3 types of Bible interpretation: Fundamentalism, liberalism and humanism.

HUX 573         Key Periods and Movements, Literature: Archetypal Criticism (3).

Exploration of a twentieth century movement in literature, archetypal criticism, which focuses on recurrent patterns in literature and their analogues in folktale, dream, ritual, and myth.

HUX 574         Key Periods and Movements, History: The Age of Revolution (3).

Study of the dynamics of economic change and political revolution with a comparison between the period 1776-1815 in Europe and North America and the period since World War II in Latin America.

HUX 575         Key Periods and Movements, Literature: Nineteenth Century
American Literature (3).

Prerequisite: HUX 502 is recommended.

Studies in the American literary tradition focusing on classic fiction by Hawthorne, Twain, Howells, James and Chopin, writers who established the mainstream of our creative aesthetic. Their novels, exploring evil, guilt, and sin, chronicle America 's spiritual uncertainties and social turbulence.

HUX 576         Key Periods and Movements, Art: Ancient Maya (3).

Prerequisites: HUX 501 and HUX 504 are recommended.

An examination of the art and architecture of the Mayan civilization in Mesoamerica in the context of its history, mythology, and archaeology.

HUX 578         Key Periods and Movements, Literature: Female Coming of Age
in World Literature (3).

Prerequisite: HUX 502 is recommended.

 An examination of 20th century world literature by female authors writing on the theme of "coming of age." Through fiction, poetry and autobiography from diverse world cultures including France, China, South Africa, Vietnam and the U.S. , a study of the influence of ethnic background and cultural traditions on the coming of age experience. Examines modern definitions of women and their survival and growth strategies. Critical analysis in a comparative literature and cultures framework with feminist perspectives.

HUX 579         The Arab World: 600 AD to Present (3).

Prerequisite: HUX 501 is recommended.

Political and cultural history of the Arab World from the 7th century to the present. Consideration of historiographic problems such as the "Great Man," cycles, and the influence of ideas on events.

HUX 580         Ancient Near East (3).

Prerequisite: HUX 501 and two additional history courses. HUX 579 is recommended.

Ancient Egyptian and Sumerian political and cultural history and their impact on later civilizations. Analysis of historical questions through study of artifacts, documents, inscriptions, and monuments.

HUX 581         Key Periods and Movements, Philosophy: Philosophy and Postmodernism (3).

Prerequisite: HUX 505.

Studies in contrasting meanings of postmodernism as it applies to philosophy. The place of philosophy in culture; the reciprocal influences of philosophy, architecture, literature and art upon each other.

HUX 594         Independent Study (3).

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and program coordinator, via signed contract.

Individually designed faculty-guided study of a topic in Literature, History, Philosophy, Music, Art, and Interdisciplinary topics. Repeatable for credit. A maximum of 9 units may be taken as Independent Study. No more than 6 units of Independent Study may be taken in one term.

HUX 595         Special Topics in the Humanities (3).

Prerequisites: Completion of Phase I requirements recommended.

Concentrated study of a specialized area in the Humanities on a selected topic of particular interest to faculty and students.

HUX 598         Final Project Proposal (1).

Prerequisites: Completion of Phases I and II; consent of instructor and program coordinator via signed contract.

Required of all HUX M.A. students. Must be passed with grade of A-B before registering for Final Project (HUX 599).

HUX 599         Final Project (4-6).

Prerequisites: Completion of Phases I and II; consent of instructor and program coordinator via signed contract.

An individually planned project based on course work taken in the program and involving basic research in a single discipline or an interdisciplinary topic. Supervised Thesis (599A) or Creative Project (599B).

HUX 600         Graduate Continuation Course (0).

Graduate students who have completed their course work but not their thesis or project, or who have other requirements remaining for the completion of their degree, must maintain continuous attendance by enrolling in this course.