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Business Administration

College of Business Administration and Public Policy

Bachelor of Science

Accounting Concentration

Entrepreneurship Concentration

Finance Concentration

General Business Concentration

Global Logistics and Supply Chain
   Management Concentration

Information Systems Concentration

Information Systems Security Concentration

International Business Concentration

Management and Human Resources Concentration

Marketing Concentration

Sports, Entertainment and Hospitality Concentration

Minors

Business Administration

Information Systems

Management

Marketing

Certificates

Accounting

Information Systems

Marketing

Master of Business Administration

Finance Concentration

General Business Concentration

Human Resources Management Concentration

Information Technology Management Concentration

International Business Concentration

Logistics Management Concentration

Management Concentration

Marketing Concentration

MBA Certificates

Logistics Management

Marketing

Faculty

Department of Accounting and Finance

Burhan Yavas, Department Chair

Prakash L. Dheeriya, Li-Lin (Sunny) Liu, Richard B. Malamud, Reza Mazhin, Tayyeb Shabbir, Ricardo Ulivi, Xinmei (Lucy) Xie, Burhan Yavas, Bingsheng Yi

Department Office: SBS A-306, (310) 243-3557 or (310) 243-3551

Department of Information
Systems and Operations Management

Myron Sheu, Department Chair

Jim Barbour, Edward K. Chu, Mohammad Eyadat, Dorothy M. Fisher, Raoul J. Freeman, Celene Navarette-Aguilar, Hamid Pourmohammadi, Fahimeh Rezayat, Vera Teller, Wang-chan Wong

Department Office: SBS A-306, (310) 243-3557 or (310) 243-3551

Department of Management and Marketing

Meng Zhao, Department Chair

Kirti Celly, Natasa Christodoulidou, Juan Holguin, David Hoopes, Stephen R. Jenner, Ernest Jewell, Jim Katzenstein, Ernest Klinger, Thomas J. Norman, Cynthia Ozeki, Melissa St. James, Bing Xu, Xia Zhao

Department Office: SBS A-306, (310) 243-3557 or (310) 243-3551

Master of Business Administration Program

Kenneth Poertner, Director

Program Office: SBS B-313, (310) 243-3465

Emeriti Faculty

Melvin P. Auerbach (Accounting & Finance), Donald J. Barnett (Accounting & Finance), Martin Blyn (Accounting & Finance), Potkin Basseer(Accounting & Finance), Barbara R. Chrispin (Management), George N. Clawson (Management), Carolyn Harris (Business Communication), Jack Kitson (Marketing), C.W. Lee (Management), Carol V. Lopilato (Accounting & Finance), Anthony Mastor (Accounting & Finance), Joseph F. McCloskey (Finance and Quantitative), Herbert J Milgrim (Accounting & Finance), R. Bryant Mills (Management), George Morris (Marketing), Mazin M Nashif (Accounting & Finance), Richard Nehrbass (Management), Larry Press (Information Systems), Harold A. Rothbart (Industrial Management), Stanley R. Schoen (Accounting & Law), Robert H. Schueler (Business Administration), Franklin Strier (Business Law), Kosaku Yoshida (Accounting & Finance), Cyril E. Zoerner, Jr. (Marketing)

College of Business Administration and Public Policy Mission Statement

The Mission of the CSUDH College of Business Administration and Public Policy is to provide a quality education to a diverse student population preparing them for career advancement and service in their community.

Features

CSU Dominguez Hills, through its College of Business Administration and Public Policy, is nationally accredited by the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs, 7007 College Blvd., Ste. 420, Overland Park, KS, 66211, to offer the following business degrees:

  • Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with concentrations in Accounting, Entrepreneurship, Finance, General Business, Global Logistics and Supply Chain Management, Information Systems, Information Systems Security, International Business, Management and Human Resources, Marketing, and Sports Entertainment and Hospitality.
  • The Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree with concentrations in Finance, General Business, Human Resources Management, Information Technology Management, International Business, Logistics Management, Management and Marketing.

Undergraduate

The undergraduate program in Business Administration, which leads to a bachelor of science degree, is designed to accomplish two objectives. The first of these is to prepare students for lifelong professional careers in commerce, finance and industry, as well as for management careers in the public and not-for-profit sectors. A second objective is to provide students with the knowledge and skills needed to obtain professional, entry level positions in one functional area of the business enterprise, or in some particular field of business.

The College of Business Administration and Public Policy offers Minors in Business Administration, Information Systems, Marketing and Management. The Minor in Business Administration is designed for students majoring in other fields who wish to acquire a basic knowledge of business for the purpose of career preparation. The Minor in Information Systems offers students the opportunity to acquire skills and knowledge in the application of computers for business decision-making. The Minor in Marketing offers students the opportunity to acquire skills and knowledge in the application of marketing concepts for business decision-making. The Minor in Management offers students the opportunity to acquire skills and knowledge in the application of management concepts for business decision-making.

The faculty represent a particularly strong combination of academic and professional credentials. Their doctoral degrees come from the finest universities in the world. Their expertise reflects specialization in different fields of business administration as well as practical experience in business and industry. The full-time faculty is augmented by highly qualified part-time faculty drawn from the business community surrounding the University. These faculty offer students a dimension of knowledge derived from actual experience, in addition to strong academic credentials.

Student Organizations include the Accounting Society, the Association of Information Technology Professionals, the Finance Association, the Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM), the International Business Student Association, the American Marketing Association, and the Association for Production and Inventory Control (APICS). Students interested in participating in one of these organizations should consult the appropriate Department Chair.

Student Honor Society. The College of Business Administration and Public Policy sponsors the Epsilon Mu Chapter of Delta Mu Delta, the national honor society for students in business administration. Founded in 1914, the main purpose of Delta Mu Delta is to promote higher scholarship in training for business and to recognize and reward scholastic attainment in business subjects. The Epsilon Mu chapter was chartered in 1989. The chapter inducts eligible undergraduate and graduate students each Fall semester. To be eligible for membership, students must have obtained a grade point average that ranks them in the top ten percent of their class.

Graduate

The Master of Business Administration (MBA) Program is designed to meet the professional needs of recent college graduates who plan careers in business, as well as of persons already employed who desire to extend their understanding of business and to increase their potential for career advancement. The program is offered for full-time students, and on a part-time basis for fully employed persons.

In addition to course work covering the Business core areas, MBA core curriculum, and concentrations in finance, general business, human resources management, information technology management, international business, logistics management, management, and marketing will be offered each term as a 595 course with departmental prefix.

Concentrations in the MBA Program are intended to improve the capacity for effective decision-making, to facilitate professional growth and development for increasing managerial responsibility and to broaden knowledge and understanding of management.

Academic Advisement

Undergraduate

The College of Business Administration and Public Policy Advisement and Student Service Center for undergraduate Majors and Minors provides authoritative information concerning student advisement, including concentration, graduation requirements, transfer of credit, and special circumstances and conditions. Students are urged to come to the Center prior to their first enrollment as business and public administration majors or minors, as well as following semesters.

Transfer students must bring a set of their college transcripts to the Center prior to enrolling as business or public administration majors or minors. Students wishing to receive credit in the major or minor for courses taken at other institutions must be verified by an advisor and approved by the respective chair of the department or the Associate Dean of the College.

Transfer credit forms may be obtained from the Center.

The Center maintains computer records of progress toward completion of degree requirements for all Majors and Minors. These records are used for counseling purposes and to check completion of course prerequisites. Each semester before registration, all students are encouraged to come to the Center for advisement and course approvals. Students should visit the Center for course approvals when adding courses during the add/drop period.

Regular office hours are held 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Friday. Telephone information is available at (310) 243-3561. The Advisement and Student Service Center can be reached at (310) 243-3561.

Concentration and Career Advising are provided by faculty and can be initiated by students to accommodate individual needs. Names of faculty and their areas of professional expertise are available in the Center and in departmental offices. Students in the various concentrations should seek advice from an appropriate department chair regarding concentration course work. Students may obtain advice from faculty about tailoring their academic programs toward career goals, about graduate schools and programs, and about career opportunities. Students are urged to consult with faculty on these matters.

Graduate

MBA students seeking academic advisement need to contact the MBA Program Office located in SBS A-313, (310) 243-1071. The MBA office is open from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Monday through Thursday and 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Friday.

Preparation

Preparation for high school students should include a solid academic program, with four years of English and mathematics, and the typical college preparatory courses in the social and natural sciences. Transfer students should have completed, if possible, lower division general education requirements, including the appropriate courses in English and mathematics. The following business courses are recommended: accounting (financial and managerial), business law, information systems for business, and economics (micro and macro).

Business and Public Administration majors and minors must bring a copy of their updated transcripts and the Certificate of Admission and Evaluation from Admissions to the Advisement and Student Service Center upon admission to the University.

Career Possibilities

Undergraduate

Employment opportunities for students with a Major in Business Administration exist within many areas. In the private sector, students will find employment in a wide variety of business and professional organizations including public accounting firms, banks, savings and loans, and other financial institutions, commercial and high technology industries, and in a multitude of firms engaged in transportation, communications and the increasingly important foreign trade sector. Furthermore, business majors are actively recruited by many not-for-profit and public organizations for their skills in accounting and financial management, marketing, computer and data processing, human resource administration and general management. Those who want to engage in entrepreneurial activity and operate their own business also will benefit from a major in business administration. In addition, an undergraduate degree in business administration is excellent preparation for graduate study in business, law and other academic areas offering a professional focus.

Graduate

MBA graduates are in high demand, primarily in the private sector, for positions in finance, accounting, information systems, management, marketing and other business areas. Major Southern California corporations offer both entry-level and advanced opportunities to graduates depending on previous education and professional experience. Recent graduates of the MBA Program are currently employed in widely diverse positions at attractive salary levels. Some graduates, interested in professional careers in teaching and research, have matriculated to doctoral programs in business at prestigious universities.

Graduation With Honors for Undergraduate Students

An undergraduate student may be a candidate for graduation with Honors in Business Administration provided he or she meets the following criteria:

1.  A minimum of 36 units in Business Administration in residence at CSU Dominguez Hills. At least 12 of these units must be in the concentration and three units must be from MGT 490;

2.  A minimum grade point average of at least 3.5 in all courses used to satisfy the upper division requirements in the major;

3.  Recommendation by the faculty of the department or program in which the honors are to be awarded.

 

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration

Total Course Requirements for the Bachelor’s Degree

See the “Requirements for the Bachelor’s Degree” in the University Catalog for complete details on general degree requirements. A minimum of 40 units, including those required for the major, must be upper division.

Elective Requirements

Completion of elective courses (beyond the requirements listed below) to reach a total of a minimum of 120 units.

General Education Requirements (55-62 units)

See the “General Education” requirements in the University Catalog and the Class Schedule for the most current information on General Education requirements and course offerings.

United States History, Constitution and American Ideals Requirement (6 units)

See the “United States History, Constitution, and American Ideals” requirements in the University Catalog.

Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement

See the “Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement” in the University Catalog.

Minor Requirements

Single field major, no minor required.

Major Requirements (69-72 units)

Students must select a concentration. The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required of all candidates for this degree.

Because most Business Administration course work completed over ten years ago is outdated, students must consult with an advisor in the Student Advisement and Service Center to ascertain whether courses taken ten or more years ago will need to be repeated. The Associate Dean in the College of Business Administration and Public Policy may waive the requirement to repeat outdated course work if there is evidence that student knowledge is current. Such evidence may consist of recent successful completion of more advanced course work in the specific discipline or satisfactory completion of designated national examinations.

Admission Requirements

Admission to the Business Administration major requires completion of all lower division Business Administration core courses with minimum grades of “C”. All new majors are classified as “pre-business majors” until the requirements are met. Upper division advanced and concentration courses are available only to “Business Administration” majors. Students should consult with an advisor in the Business Advisement Center for more information.

A.  Prerequisites and Residency Unit Requirements

1.  MAT 009 or equivalent with a grade of “C” or better is prerequisite to ACC 230 and CIS 270.

2.  All business majors are required to complete at least 36 units of the major in residence, including at least 12 of these units in the concentration and three units from MGT 490.

 

B.  Business Curriculum (45 units)

1.  Lower Division Required Core Courses (18 units):

ACC 230. Financial Accounting (3)

ACC 231. Managerial Accounting (3)

CIS 270. Information Systems and Technology Fundamentals (3)

ECO 210. Economic Theory 1A (Microeconomics) (3)

ECO 211. Economic Theory 1B (Macroeconomics) (3)

LAW 240. Legal Environment of Business (3)

 NOTES:           

       1. All lower division courses required for the Business Administration major must be completed with a grade of “C” or better.

       2. Students must complete all lower division core courses and satisfy the University’s lower division English composition requirements (ENG 110 and ENG 111) and the General Education mathematics requirement prior to enrolling in upper division business courses. Students who do not successfully complete the lower division prerequisites will not be permitted to enroll in upper division courses.

       3. Students in Business Administration should take statistics as the
General Education Quantitative Reasoning requirement, otherwise OMG 221 will need to be taken as a prerequisite to OMG 321.

 

2.  Upper Division Required Core Courses (18 units):

BUS 300. Business Communications (3)

CIS 370. Information Systems Theory and Practice (3)

FIN 360. Business Finance (3)

MGT 310. Management Theory (3)

MKT 350. Principles of Marketing (3)

OMG 321. Business Statistics (3)

NOTE: BUS 300 must be taken during or prior to the semester when the student first registers for any other Business Administration upper division course.

3.  Upper Division Advanced Core Courses (9 units):

BUS 445. International Business (3)

MGT 490. Strategic Management Seminar (3)*

OMG 322. Operations Management (3)

NOTE: MGT 490 is a capstone course and should be taken during the last semester before graduation with 400-level core courses and concentration courses (or General Education courses). Students must meet the specific course prerequisites for MGT 490.

Each Business Administration major must select one of the concentrations listed below:

Accounting Concentration (24 units)

A.  Required Courses - All Tracks (12 units):

ACC 330. Intermediate Accounting I (3)

ACC 331. Intermediate Accounting II (3

ACC 333. Income Taxation I (3)

ACC 337. Cost Accounting (3)

 

B.  Electives - Select an additional 12 units from upper division Business Administration courses, of which at least 9 units must be from the following upper division courses.

ACC 336. Introduction to Internal Auditing (3)

ACC 339. Accounting and Control in Multinational Companies (3)

ACC 430. Advanced Accounting (3)

ACC 431. Governmental and Non-Profit Accounting (3)

ACC 433. Income Taxation II (3)

ACC 435. Auditing (3)

LAW 340. Law of Business Organizations (3)

NOTE: Students should consider professional certification exams (CPA, CMA, CIA, CFM) after completing additional preparation and extensive review.

Entrepreneurship Concentration (24 units)

A.  Required Courses (9 units):

FIN 485. Entrepreneurial Finance (3)

MGT 412. Small Business Management (3)

MKT 454. Marketing Research (3)

 

B.  Select four courses from the following (12 units):

ACC 337. Cost Accounting (3)

FIN 480. Economics of the Firm (3)

LAW 340. Law of Business Organizations (3)

HRM 313. Human Resource Management (3)

MGT 416. Leadership (3)

OMG 430. Supply Chain Management (3)

 

C. Select one course from the following or from section B (3 units):

FIN 382. Financial Analysis I (3)

FIN 483. Financial Analysis II (3)

MKT 450. Internet Marketing (3)

MKT 352. Advertising and Promotion Management (3)

Finance Concentration (24 units)

A.  Required Courses (9 units):

FIN 382. Financial Analysis I (3)

FIN 468. Seminar in Investment Analysis (3)

FIN 483. Financial Analysis II (3)

 

B.  Select five courses from the following (15 units):

ACC 337. Cost Accounting (3)

FIN 375. Personal Financial Planning (3)

FIN 425. Security Analysis (3)

FIN 467. Real Estate Finance and Investment (3)

FIN 480. Economics of the Firm (3)

FIN 481. Financial Institutions Management (3)

FIN 484. Business Forecasting (3)

FIN 488. Multinational Financial Transactions (3)

FIN 494. Independent Study in Finance (3)

FIN 496. Internship in Finance (3)

OMG 423. Introduction to Operations Research (3)

General Business Concentration (24 units)

A.  Required Courses (6 units):

MGT 312. Organizational Behavior (3)

MGT 412. Small Business Management (3)

 

B.  Select six courses from the following (18 units):

ACC 333. Income Taxation (3)

ACC 337. Cost Accounting (3)

ACC 433. Income Taxation II (3)

CIS 275. Introduction to Network-Based Applications (3)

CIS 372. Analysis and Logical Design (3)

FIN 468. Seminar in Investment Analysis (3)

FIN 484. Business Forecasting (3)

HRM 313. Human Resource Management (3)

LAW 340. Law of Business Organizations (3)

MKT 355. Consumer Behavior (3)

MKT 454. Marketing Research (3)

OMG 430. Supply Chain Management (3)

Global Logistics and Supply Chain Management Concentration (24 units)

A. Required Courses - All Tracks (12 units):

OMG 220. Introduction to Transportation Management (3)

OMG 225. Introduction to Logistics Management (3)

OMG 230. Introduction to Supply Chain Management (3)

CIS 372. Analysis and Logical Design (3)

 

B.  Students interested in the Global Logistics and Supply Chain Management Concentration must select one of the tracks listed.

1. International Logistics Track - select four courses from the following (12 units):

OMG 420. Global Transportation Management (3)

OMG 425. Logistics Management (3)

OMG 427. Quality Management (3)

OMG 430. Supply Chain Management (3)

ACC 339. Accounting and Control in Multinational Companies (3)

MKT 358. International Marketing (3)

MGT 418. Seminar in Comparative Management Systems (3)

FIN 488. Multinational Financial Transactions (3)

CIS 476. Advanced Concepts for Business Systems (3)

CIS 496. Internship in Computer Information Systems (3)

2.  Systems Track - select four courses from the following (12 units)

CIS 272. Business Programming I (3)

CIS 275. Introduction to Network-Based Applications (3)

CIS 473. Database Systems (3)

CIS 475. Data Communications (3)

CIS 476. Advanced Concepts for Business Systems (3)

CIS 496. Internship for Information Systemsand Supply Chain Management (3)

Information Systems Concentration (27 units)

A.  Required Courses (18 units):

CIS 272. Business Programming I (3)

CIS 275. Introduction to Network-Based Applications (3)

CIS 372. Analysis and Logical Design (3)

CIS 473. Database Systems (3)

CIS 474. Systems Development (3)

CIS 475. Data Communications (3)

 

B.  Electives: Select three courses from the following (9 units):

CIS 371. Business Programming II (3)

CIS 378. Information Security Theories and Practice (3)

CIS 471. Advanced, Network-based Applications in Business (3)

CIS 476. Advanced Concepts for Business Systems (3)

CIS 477. Advanced Data Communications (3)

CIS 478. Firewall and Computer Network Security (3)

CIS 480. Advanced Database Systems (3)

CIS 482. Databases and Web Security (3)

CIS 488. Management of Information Security (3)

CIS 496. Internship in Computer Information Systems (3)

Information Systems Security Concentration (27 units)

A.  Required Courses (21 units):

CIS 272. Business Programming I (3)

CIS 275. Introduction to Network-Based Applications (3)

CIS 372. Analysis and Logical Design (3)

CIS 378. Information Security Theory and Practice (3)

CIS 473. Database Systems (3)

CIS 475. Data Communications (3)

CIS 478. Firewall and Computer Network Security (3)

 

B.  Electives: Select two courses from the following (6 units):

CIS 482. Databases and Web Security (3)

CIS 488. Management of Information Security (3)

CIS 496. Internship in Computer Information Systems (3)

International Business Concentration (24 units)

A.  Track 1: General Emphasis

1.  Required Courses (15 units):

POL 100. General Studies Political Science: World Perspectives (3)

ACC 339. Accounting and Control in Multinational Companies (3)

FIN 488. Multinational Financial Transactions (3)

MGT 418. Seminar in Comparative Management Systems (3)

MKT 358. International Marketing (3)

2.  Select three courses from the following (9 units):

ANT 335. Comparative Cultures (3)

ECO 340. International Trade Theory (3)

ECO 341. International Finance (3)

POL 335. International Politics (3)

POL 336. Theories of International Relations (3)

 

B.  Track 2: Latin American Emphasis (24 units)

1.  Required Courses (12 units):

ACC 339. Accounting and Control in Multinational Companies (3)

FIN 488. Multinational Financial Transactions (3)

MGT 418. Seminar in Comparative Management Systems (3)

MKT 358. International Marketing (3)

2.  Competency in Spanish (3 units):

SPA 302. Business Spanish (3)

3.  Select three courses from the following (9 units):

ANT 333. Ancient Peoples of Mexico and Guatemala (3)

HIS 366. Latin America: Colonial Period (3)

HIS 367. Latin America: National Period (3)

POL 343. Political Behavior in Latin America (3)

POL 344. Latin America: The Revolutionary Tradition (3)

NOTE: Competency in a foreign language is important for students pursuing this concentration and is, therefore, highly recommended. Foreign language courses may be used to fulfill General Education requirements.

Management and Human Resources Concentration (24 units)

Students interested in the Management and Human Resources Concentration must select one of the tracks listed below.

A. Management Track - (24 units)

1.  Required Courses (18 units):

HRM 313. Human Resource Management (3)

MGT 312. Organizational Behavior (3)

MGT 412. Small Business Management (3)

MGT 416. Leadership (3)

MGT 418. Seminar in Comparative Management Systems (3)

MGT 495. Special Topics in Management (3)

2. Electives (6 units):

     Students will select two additional courses from the Business Administration program with the advisement of the Department Chair. These may include, but are not limited to the following:

MGT 494. Independent Study in Management (3)

MGT 495. Special Topics in Management (3)

MGT 496. Management Internship (3)

 

B.  Human Resources Track (24 units)

1.  Required Courses (12 units):

HRM 313. Human Resource Management (3)

HRM 321. Designing Compensation Plans and Incentive Plans (3)

HRM 425. Seminar in Strategic Human Resource Management (3)

MGT 312. Organizational Behavior (3)

2.  Electives - Select four courses from the following (12 units):

HRM 316. Labor and Industrial Relations (3)

LAW 342. Employment Law (3)

MGT 416. Leadership (3)

MGT 418. Seminar in Comparative Management Systems (3)

MGT 494. Independent Study in Management (3)

MGT 495. Special Topics in Management (3)

MGT 496. Management Internship (3)

Marketing Concentration (24 units)

Each student interested in the Marketing Concentration must select one of the tracks listed below.

A.  Track 1: Marketing Management Emphasis

1.  Required Courses (9 units):

MKT 355. Consumer Behavior (3)

MKT 454. Marketing Research (3)

MKT 459. Seminar in Marketing Management (3)

2.  Select five courses from the following (15 units):

MKT 351. Sales Management and Sales Techniques (3)

MKT 352. Advertising and Promotion Management (3)

MKT 353. Retail Marketing Management (3)

MKT 358. International Marketing (3)

MKT 450. Internet Marketing (3)

MKT 451. Trade Show and Event Marketing (3)

MKT 452. Sports and Entertainment Marketing (3)

MKT 495. Special Topics in Marketing (3)

OMG 430. Supply Chain Management (3)

 

B.  Track 2: Advertising Emphasis

1.  Required Courses (15 units):

MKT 352. Advertising and Promotion Management (3)

MKT 355. Consumer Behavior (3)

MKT 454. Marketing Research (3)

MKT 459. Seminar in Marketing Management (3)

COM 344. Advertising Media Analysis (3)

2. Select three courses from the following (9 units):

MKT 450. Internet Marketing (3)

MKT 452. Sports and Entertainment Marketing (3)

MKT 495. Special Topics in Marketing (3)

COM 365. Introduction to Public Relations (3)

COM 342. Advertising Copywriting (3)

NOTE: MKT 495 may be taken twice with different topics.

Sports, Entertainment and Hospitality Management Concentration (24 units)

A. Required Courses (12 units):

MKT 452. Sports and Entertainment Marketing (3)

SEH 310. Sports, Entertainment and Hospitality Management (3)

SEH 348. Principles of Travel and Tourism (3)

SEH 448. Hotel and Resort Management (3)

 

B.  Select four courses from the following (12 units):

MGT 416. Leadership (3)

MKT 451. Trade Show and Event Marketing (3)

PSY 480. Sports Psychology (3)

REC 355. Management of Recreation and Leisure Services (3)

SEH 330. Managing Sports Facilities (3)

SEH 495. Special Topics in Hospitality Management (3)

SEH 496. Internship (3)

Minor in Business Administration (27 units)

The Minor in Business Administration is designed for students majoring in other fields who wish to acquire a basic knowledge of business. All lower division courses required for the Business Administration minor must be completed with a grade of “C” or better prior to enrollment in upper division courses. Permission of an advisor is required to enroll in upper division courses.

A.  Lower Division Required Courses (12 units):

ECO 210. Economic Theory 1A (Microeconomics) (3)

ECO 211. Economic Theory 1B (Macroeconomics) (3)

ACC 230. Financial Accounting (3)

CIS 270. Information Systems and Technology Fundamentals (3)

 

B.  Upper Division Requirements (15 units)

1.  Required Courses (12 units):

CIS 370. Information Systems Theory and Practice (3)

FIN 360. Business Finance (3)

MGT 310. Management Theory (3)

MKT 350. Principles of Marketing (3)

2.  Elective (3 units): Select one additional upper division course in Business Administration with the assistance of the School of Business and Public Administration coordinator of undergraduate advisement.

Minor in Information Systems (15-17 units)

The Minor in Information Systems offers students the opportunity to acquire skills and knowledge on the application side of computer systems. It thus provides an excellent complement to training in theoretical aspects of computer systems. A total of six or seven lower division units and 9 upper division units comprise the minor.

A.  Lower Division Requirements (6 - 8 units)

1.  Select one course from the following (3-4 units):

CIS 270. Information Systems and Technology Fundamentals (3)

CSC 111. Introduction to Computers and Basic Programming (3)

CSC 121. Introduction to Computer Science & Programming I (4)

2.  Select one course from the following (3-4 units):

CIS 272. Business Programming I (3)

CSC 123. Introduction to Computer Science & Programming II (4)

 

B.  Upper Division Required Courses (9 units)

1. Required course (3 units):

CIS 370. Information Systems Theory and Practice (3)

2. Two courses selected from: (6 units):

CIS 372. Analysis and Logical Design (3)

CIS 474. Systems Development (3)

CIS 471. Advanced, Network-Based Applications in Business (3)

CIS 473. Database Systems (3)

CIS 475. Data Communications (3)

CIS 476. Advanced Concepts for Business Systems (3) [I]

CIS 496. Internship in Computer Information Systems (3)

Minor in Management (15 units)

The Minor in Management is designed for students majoring in other fields who wish to acquire knowledge and skill in basic management applicable to all organizations. A total of 15 units in upper division Management courses is required. A grade point average of 2.0 must be achieved in the minor. All students interested in the Minor in Management should seek advising from the Chair of the Department of Management. Permission of CBAPP Student Advisement and Service Center is required to enroll in upper division management courses.

A.  Required Courses (12 units):

HRM 313. Human Resource Management (3)

HRM 316. Labor and Industrial Relations (3)

MGT 310. Management Theory (3)

MGT 312. Organizational Behavior (3)

 

B.  Elective: Select one course from the following: (3 units)

MGT 416. Leadership (3)

MGT 418. Seminar in Comparative Management Systems (3)

Minor in Marketing (12 units)

The Minor in Marketing is designed for students majoring in other fields who wish to acquire marketing knowledge and competence. A total of 12 units in upper division marketing courses are required. It is suggested that students take ECO 210, Economic Theory 1A (Microeconomics) prior to enrolling in MKT 350. A grade point average of 2.0 must be achieved in the minor.

A.  Required Course (3 units):

MKT 350. Principles of Marketing (3)

 

B.  Electives (9 units): Three elective courses to be chosen from the following:

MKT 351. Sales Management and Sales Techniques (3)

MKT 352. Advertising and Promotion Management (3)

MKT 353. Retail Marketing Management (3)

MKT 355. Consumer Behavior (3)

MKT 358. International Marketing (3)

MKT 450. Internet Marketing (3)

MKT 452. Sports and Entertainment Marketing (3)

MKT 454. Marketing Research (3)

MKT 495. Special Topics in Marketing (3)

NOTE: MKT 495 may be taken twice with different topics.

Certificate in Accounting (24-54 units)

The Accounting Certificate program is designed to meet the needs of individuals who already hold a bachelors degree in another area, either in business with a concentration in another field or outside of business, and who now wish to acquire accounting competence. The certificate may be earned by regularly matriculated students who complete the following CSUDH courses, or show evidence of having done so elsewhere, with a grade point average of no less than 2.5. At least four of the eight accounting curriculum courses must be taken at CSU Dominguez Hills.

A.  Accounting Certificate Prerequisites (30 units)

     The following courses are the required prerequisites for students without a Bachelor’s degree in Business:

1.  Lower Division Prerequisites (15 units):

ACC 230. Financial Accounting (3)

ACC 231. Managerial Accounting (3)

CIS 270. Information Systems and Technology Fundamentals (3)

ECO 210. Economic Theory 1A (Microeconomics) (3)

LAW 240. Legal Environment of Business (3)

2.  Upper Division Prerequisites (15 units):

CIS 370. Information Systems Theory and Practice (3)

FIN 360. Business Finance (3)

MGT 310. Management Theory (3)

MKT 350. Principles of Marketing (3)

OMG 321. Introduction to Business Statistics (3)

 

B.  Required Courses (12 units):

ACC 330. Intermediate Accounting I (3)

ACC 331. Intermediate Accounting II (3

ACC 333. Income Taxation I (3)

ACC 337. Cost Accounting (3)

 

C. Electives:  Select an additional 12 units from upper division Business Administration courses, of which at least 9 units must be from the following upper division courses.

ACC 336. Introduction to Internal Auditing (3)

ACC 339. Accounting and Control in Multinational Companies (3)

ACC 430. Advanced Accounting (3)

ACC 431. Governmental and Non-Profit Accounting (3)

ACC 433. Income Taxation II (3)

ACC 435. Auditing (3)

LAW 340. Law of Business Organizations (3)

NOTE: Students should consider professional certification exams (CPA, CMA, CIA, CFM) after completing additional preparation and extensive review.

Certificate in Information Systems (15-21 units)

The Information Systems Certificate program is designed to meet the needs of individuals who already hold a bachelor’s degree in another area, either in business with a concentration in another field or outside of business, and who now wish to acquire information systems competence. The certificate may be earned by regularly matriculating students who complete the listed CSUDH courses, or show evidence of having done so elsewhere, where an overall GPA of no less than 2.5. At least four of the Information Systems Curriculum courses must be taken at CSUDH, and the certificate will be granted upon completion of requirements.

A.  Required Courses (6 units):

CIS 270. Information Systems and Technology Fundamentals (3)

CIS 370. Information Systems Theory and Practice (3)

 

B.  Electives: Students must select one of the following Options: (15 units):

Option 1: Systems Design and Management

1.  Required Courses (9 units):

CIS 372. Analysis and Logical Design (3)

CIS 473. Database Systems (3)

CIS 474. Systems Development (3)

2.  And two other courses from those listed below (6 units):

CIS 272. Business Programming I (3)

CIS 275. Introduction to Network-Based Applications (3)

CIS 276. Personal Productivity with Information Systems Technology (3)

CIS 370. Information Systems Theory and Practice (3)

CIS 371. Business Programming II (3)

CIS 471. Advanced, Network-Based Applications (3)

CIS 475. Data Communications (3)

Option 2: Network Application

1. Required Courses (9 units):

CIS 275. Introduction to Network-based Applications (3)

CIS 471. Advanced, Network-Based Applications (3)

CIS 475. Data Communications (3)

2. And two other courses from those listed below (6 units):

CIS 272. Business Programming I (3)

CIS 276. Personal Productivity with Information Systems Technology (3)

CIS 370. Information Systems Theory and Practice (3)

CIS 371. Business Programming II (3)

CIS 372. Analysis and Logical Design (3)

CIS 474. System Development (3)

Certificate in Marketing (18-30 units)

The Marketing Certificate program is designed to meet the needs of individuals who already hold a bachelor’s degree in another area, either in business with a concentration in another field or outside
of business, and who now wish to acquire marketing knowledge and competence. The certificate may be earned by regularly matriculated students who complete the following CSUDH courses, or show evidence of having done so elsewhere, with a grade point average
of no less than 2.5. At least four of the six marketing curriculum courses must be taken at CSU Dominguez Hills.

A.  Marketing Certificate Prerequisites (12 units)

     The following are the courses required for students without a Bachelor’s degree in Business:

1.  Lower Division Prerequisites (6 units):

CIS 270. Information Systems and Technology Fundamentals (3)

ECO 210. Economic Theory IA (Microeconomics) (3)

NOTE: Students who can demonstrate competence in computer application software usage, specifically word processing and spreadsheet software, will not be required to take CIS 270.

2.  Upper Division Prerequisites (6 units):

MKT 350. Principles of Marketing (3)

OMG 321. Introduction to Business Statistics (3)

 

B.  Marketing Certificate Requirements (18 units)

     The following are the required courses for ALL students interested in the Certificate in Marketing, including those with a business degree in a non-marketing area:

1.  Required Courses (9 units):

MKT 355. Consumer Behavior (3)

MKT 454. Marketing Research (3)

MKT 459. Seminar in Marketing Management (3)

2.  Select three course from the following (9 units):

MKT 351. Sales Management and Sales Techniques (3)

MKT 352. Advertising and Promotion Management (3)

MKT 353. Retail Marketing Management (3)

MKT 358. International Marketing (3)

MKT 450. Internet Marketing (3)

MKT 452. Sports and Entertainment Marketing (3)

MKT 495. Special Topics in Marketing (3)

OMG 430. Supply Chain Management (3)

NOTE: MKT 495 may be taken twice with different topics.

 

Master of Business Administration Admission Requirements

All applicants must submit a completed application for admission for Graduate Standing through the csumentor.edu

The evaluated summary forms of applicants meeting University admission requirements are then forwarded to the MBA program office.  Students may be admitted to the MBA program if they meet all requirements listed below:

  1. A bachelor’s degree from a fully accredited college or university;              
  2. Good standing at the last institution attended;
  3. A minimum score of 570 paper-based total, (230 computerized)(internet based 88) on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) (required only of international students from non-English speaking countries); or a IELTS score of at least 6.5;
  4. A grade point average overall of 3.0; or a minimum 2.75 grade point average (GPA) in the last 60 units (90 quarter units) earned for a baccalaureate degree;  after completion of baccalaureate degree; only upper division is counted in the last 60 units calculated;
  5. A minimum score of 450 on the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) and minimum scores at or above the 25th percentile on both the verbal and the quantitative segments.   GMAT scores should be sent directly to the MBA program office.

      Note: Normally, the GMAT is administered the last 27 days of each month at testing centers throughout the U.S. and selected foreign countries.  Examination dates should be scheduled far enough in advance so that GMAT scores can be submitted to the MBA Office prior to the admissions deadline for the semester.

  6. Apply through the CSUmentor.edu

 For application and information about the GMAT and test dates, contact Educational Testing Service in Princeton, N.J., 1-800-GMAT-NOW or visit their web site;  www.gmac.com

MBA Admission Deadlines

Domestic students seeking admission should submit a complete application and transcripts of previous college work to the Admissions Office. See CSUmentor.edu for application deadlines. Please note deadlines for the campus program and online program differ.

International student applications, including TOEFL score and transcripts, are due in the Admissions Office and the MBA Office by April 1 if the application is for the Fall semester.

Applications received after these deadlines will be considered on a space-available basis only.

MBA Advisement

All MBA students receive academic advising and assistance from the MBA Director and International Student Advisor.  New students should schedule an appointment with the MBA Office prior to registration to establish an administrative file and a plan of study.  Call (310) 243-3465 for an appointment.

Enrollment in 500-Level Courses

Applicants must be admitted to the MBA program as “Graduate Classified” students before they may enroll in 500-level MBA courses. Graduate classified students from other departments may, with approval of the MBA Program Coordinator, enroll in MBA courses if those courses are an approved part of that department’s graduation requirements.

Transfer Credit Requests

Students who have completed business courses at an accredited college or university may request a waiver of Business Core prerequisites by petition to the MBA office at least three weeks prior to the first semester of attendance. Courses must have been completed with a grade of “C” or better.

Students transferring from other MBA programs may request transfer credit for equivalent MBA courses. Transfer credit for MBA course work is limited to nine semester units and will be granted only for equivalent courses taken at an accredited university or college and for which the student received a grade of “B” or better.

All MBA course work, and Business Core prerequisites, if taken as part of the MBA program, must be completed within five years to meet University and College of Business Administration and Public Policy graduation requirements.

Additional MBA Program Requirements

A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better in all courses taken to satisfy the requirements for the degree is required. A student will be placed on probation if, in any semester, he or she has failed to earn a grade point average of at least 3.0 or higher for the work taken through that semester. During the subsequent probationary semester the student must achieve a grade point average sufficiently high to bring the cumulative grade point average to 3.0 or better. Failure to do so will result in dismissal from the program.

Any student receiving a “C” grade or lower during any semester must meet with the MBA Director prior to registering for the next semester to discuss the student’s progress. Any course in which a grade lower than a “C” (2.0) is earned must be repeated for a grade of “C” or better and the two grades averaged. Graduate students, unlike undergraduates, may not repeat a course and drop the lowest grade (Repeat and Cancel).

All graduate students are required to satisfy the University’s Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (GWAR). MBA students must satisfy this requirement during the first semester of residence by one of four methods:

  1. Take the Graduation Writing Examination (GWE) administered by the campus Testing Office.
    A score of 8 out of 12 will satisfy this requirement.
  2. Take ENG 350 and receive a letter grade of “B” or better.
  3. Submit a waiver request to the campus writing coordinator if a writing requirement at another university has already satisfied the requirement.
  4. Obtain a score of 4.0 or higher on the Analytical Writing Analysis part of Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT).

MBA students must submit written verification of completion of the GWAR to the MBA Office prior to the beginning of the second semester of enrollment. Students not submitting written verification prior to the start of classes for the second semester in residence will be restricted to enrollment in Business Core or undergraduate equivalent courses only. Students attempting to enroll in Graduate Seminars for a second semester without completion of the GWAR are subject to administrative disenrollment.

Applicants and admitted students should consult the MBA Program Bulletin for additional information on deadlines and program requirements. The MBA Program Bulletin is available from the MBA Office.

Degree Requirements (30-60 units)

A. Prerequisites BUSINESS CORE AREAS (9-30 units)

     Required only of those students who have not already taken business classes from an accredited college or university and have been taken within the last 10 years; or by completing online “bridge leveling” courses.

         Students who are required to complete Business Core prerequisites must do so prior to enrolling in core courses. There are no exceptions to this policy. Catalog prerequisites will be enforced.

The following courses are on-campus courses:

ACC 230. Financial Accounting (3)

LAW 240. Business Law (3)           

CIS 370. Information Systems Theory and Practice (3)

ECO 210. Macro Economics (3)

ECO 211. Micro Economics (3)

FIN 360. Business Finance (3)

MGT 310. Management Theory (3)

MKT 350. Principles of Marketing (3)

OMG 321. Introduction to Business Statistics (3)

OMG 423. Operations Research (3)

The following courses are “bridge or leveling courses (available online only):

BUS 495. Financial Accounting/Business Finance (2)

BUS 495. Operations Research/Business Statistics (2)

BUS 495. Management Theory/Legal Environment (2)

BUS 495. Marketing Principles/Economies of the Firm (2)

BUS 495. Information Systems (1)

 

B.  Graduate Courses (18-21 units)

1.  Required Courses (12 units):

FIN 500. Advanced Topics in Finance (3)

MGT 500. Human Behavior in Organizations (3)

MKT 500. Marketing Management (3)

MGT 590. Strategic Management (3)*
another class will be substituted for this class in MKT and CIS concentration.

        * Must be taken during the last semester in residence

2.  Select three courses from the following (9 units):

ACC 502. Advanced Topics in Accounting (3)

CIS 502. Advanced Topics in Information Systems (3)

FIN 502. Advanced Topics in International Business (3)

OMG 502. Advanced Topics in Operations Management (3)

NOTE: International Business Concentration students must include FIN 502 and two of the other courses listed above.

 

C. Each student must select one concentration from the following (9-12 units):

Finance Concentration (12 units)

FIN 503. Advanced Topics In Multinational Finance (3)

FIN 504. Financial Valuation Analysis (3)

FIN 505. Advanced Management of Financial Institutions (3)

FIN 506. Investments And Portfolio Management (3)

FIN 507. Derivatives And Futures Markets (3)

FIN 595. Special Topics In Finance (3)

General Business Concentration (9 units)

Students may choose one, two, or three electives to be offered as 595: Special Topics, and/or any other graduate business courses not used to satisfy other requirements for the degree. This also includes MKT 595 and MGT 595, FIN 595, OMG 595, CIS 595, ACC 595, Bus 595, Law 595 (3) or any elective not being used in another concentration.

Human Resource Management Concentration (12 units)

1.  Required Courses (9 units):

HRM 520. Essentials of Human Resource Management (3)

HRM 521. Compensation and Benefits (3)

HRM 525. Strategic Human Resource Management (3)

2.  Select one from the following (3 units):

MGT 503. Advanced Topics in International Management (3)

MGT 512. Seminar in Entrepreneurship (3)

MGT 516. Leadership (3)

MGT 595. Special Topics in Management (3)

Information Technology Management Concentration (15 units)

1.  Required courses (3 units):

CIS 580. Information Technology Management Capstone Project (3)*

        * Class replaces MGT 590.

 

     2. Select four from the following (12 units):

CIS 503. Information Technology In International Business (3)

CIS 520. Data Communication For Management (3)

CIS 530. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) (3)

CIS 540. Data Warehousing and Data Mining (3)

CIS 550. Project Management (3)

CIS 560. Information Security for Management (3)

CIS 575. SAP Supply Chain (3)

CIS 595. Selected Topics in Computer Information Systems (3)

International Business Concentration (9 units)

FIN 503. Advanced Topics in Multinational Finance (3)

MGT 503. Advanced Topics in International Management (3)

MKT 503. International Marketing: Cases and Current Issues (3)

Logistics Management Concentration (15 units)

CIS 530. Enterprise Resource Planning (3)

CIS 575. SAP Supply Chain (3)

OMG 510. Logistics Application (3)

OMG 520. Logistics Case Studies (3)

OMG 580. Logistics Management Capstone (3)

Management Concentration (12 units)

1.  Required Courses (6 units):

MGT 516. Leadership (3)

HRM 520. Essentials Of Human Resource Management (3)

2.  Select two from the following (6 units):

MGT 512. Seminar In Entrepreneurship (3)

HRM 521. Compensation And Benefits (3)

MGT 595. Special Topics (3)

MGT 503. Advanced Topics In International Management (3)

HRM 525. Strategic Human Resources Management (3)

MGT 530. Strategic Communication (3)

Marketing Concentration (15 units)

1.  Required Course (6 units):

MKT 501. Marketing Information Management (3)

MKT 580. Strategic Marketing (3) (replaces MGT 590 in core)

2.  Select three courses from the following (9 units):

MKT 503. International Marketing: Cases and Current Issues (3)

MKT 510. Seminar in Business-to-Business Marketing (3)

MKT 512. Seminar in Services Marketing (3)

MKT 530. Negotiations and Persuasive Presentation (3)

MKT 531. Sales Management (3)

MKT 545. Seminar in New Product Development (3)

MKT 550. Internet Marketing (3)

MKT 560. Brand Management (3)

Post-MBA Certificate in Logistics Management (12 units)

Requirements

A.  A Master's Degree from an accredited university.

B.  Approval by the Graduate Director.

C. The certificate may be earned by regularly matriculated students who complete the following CSUDH courses:

OMG 510. Logistics Application (3)

OMG 520. Logistics Case Studies (3)

CIS 530. Enterprise Resource Planning (3)

CIS 575. SAP Supply Chain (3)

Post-MBA Certificate in Marketing (15 units)

The Marketing Certificate program is designed to meet the needs of individuals who already hold a master’s degree in another area, with a concentration in another field who now wish to acquire marketing knowledge and competence.

Admission Requirements

A.  A Master’s degree from an accredited university.

B.  Approval by the MBA Coordinator.

C. The certificate may be earned by regularly matriculated students who complete the following CSUDH courses:

1.  Required courses (9 units).

MKT 500. Marketing Management (3)

MKT 501. Marketing Information Management (3)

MKT 580. Strategic Marketing (3)

1.  Two electives selected from the following courses (6 units)

MKT 510. Seminar in Business-to-Business Marketing (3)

MKT 512. Seminar in Services Marketing (3)

MKT 530. Negotiations and Persuasive Presentation (3)

MKT 531. Sales Management (3)

MKT 545. Seminar in New Product Development (3)

MKT 550. Internet Marketing (3)

MKT 555. Seminar in Consumer Behavior (3)

MKT 595. Advanced Marketing Topics (3)

Course Offerings

The credit value for each course in semester units is indicated for each term by a number in parentheses following the title. For course availability, please see the list of tentative course offerings in the current Class Schedule.

 

Accounting

Lower Division

ACC 230          Financial Accounting (3).

Prerequisite: MAT 9 or equivalent.

A survey of financial statements under existing generally accepted accounting principles. Emphasis is on underlying concepts, principles, and mechanics to make the statements meaningful to users.

ACC 231          Managerial Accounting (3).

Prerequisite: ACC 230.

Accounting for planning and control. Topics include objectives, terminology, concepts, product costing, cost patterns, cost-volume-profit analysis, contribution margin, profit planning, standard costs, flexible budgets, decentralized operations, relevant costs and uses of accounting data for managerial decision making.

Upper Division

ACC 330          Intermediate Accounting I (3).

Prerequisite: ACC 230.

Professional level accounting, conceptual framework, balance sheet, income statement, compound interest, cash, receivables, inventories, fixed and intangible assets, depreciation, current and contingent liabilities.

ACC 331          Intermediate Accounting II (3).

Prerequisite: ACC 330.

Professional level accounting, bonds and long-term notes, short-term and long-term investments, capital stock, retained earnings, income recognition, income taxes, post-employment benefits, leases, statement of cash flows, earnings per share, changes and errors, financial analysis.

ACC 333          Income Taxation I (3).

Prerequisite: ACC 230.

Federal income tax law as related to individuals and sole proprietorships.

ACC 336          Introduction to Internal Auditing (3).

Prerequisite: ACC 231 and CIS 270.

Survey of contemporary internal auditing with emphasis on financial, compliance, and operational auditing. Coverage will include audit planning, specific audit techniques, auditing in a computerized environment, emerging issues and report writing. Course includes case studies and computer applications.

ACC 337          Cost Accounting (3).

Prerequisite: ACC 231.

The nature, objectives, and procedure of cost accounting and control; job costing and process costing; joint product costing; standard costs; theories of cost allocation and absorption; uses of cost accounting data for management decision making.

ACC 339          Accounting and Control in Multinational Companies (3).

Prerequisite: ACC 231.

Study of comparative accounting systems, international accounting standards, currency translation and foreign exchange, transfer pricing, reporting, taxation, auditing and control problems.

ACC 430          Advanced Accounting (3).

Prerequisite: ACC 331.

Concepts and principles of partnerships, business combinations, accounting for multinational enterprises, and introduction to governmental and nonprofit accounting.

ACC 431          Governmental and Non-Profit Accounting (3).

Prerequisite: ACC 230.

Nature of fund accounting systems used by governments and nonprofit entities. Topics include principles underlying fund accounting, budgeting procedures, discussion of types of funds used. Course requirements include computerized term project.

ACC 433          Income Taxation II (3).

Prerequisite: ACC 333.

Federal income tax law as related to partnerships, corporations, estates and trusts; estate and gift taxes.

ACC 435          Auditing (3).

Prerequisites: ACC 330 and OMG 321.

The audit environment, reports, professional ethics, objectives, evidence and documentation, planning, analytical review, materiality and risk, internal control, attribute and variable sampling, EDP systems, transactions cycles, balance sheet and income statement accounts, compilations, reviews, and other special purpose reports.

Graduate

Graduate classified standing in the MBA program or consent of the MBA program coordinator is prerequisite to enrollment in graduate (500 level) courses.

 

ACC 502          Advanced Topics in Accounting (3).

Prerequisite: ACC 230 or equivalent.

Application of functional accounting in contemporary business. Decision making through the integrated use of financial accounting (reporting to outside interests) and managerial accounting (accounting information for internal decision making) including relevant income tax consequences. Case analysis oral/written presentation and computer usage required.

ACC 595          Selected Topics in Accounting (3).

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and ACC 502.

Intensive study of a specialized area of Accounting on a selected topic of particular interest to faculty and students. Three hours of seminar per week. Specific topic listed in class schedule. Repeatable course.

Business

Upper Division

BUS 300         Business Communications (3).

Prerequisite: ENG 111 is required. Satisfaction of the junior level competency in writing requirement (GWE score of 7 or better OR a certification writing course such as ENG 350) is strongly recommended.

Introduces the Business Administration student to effective business communication tools and techniques. Includes all standard forms of contemporary business communication, both written and oral. Students will have weekly written and/or oral assignments with appropriate feedback. A-C/NC grading.

BUS 445         International Business (3).

Prerequisites: FIN 360, MGT 310 and MKT 350.

An introduction to international business with an emphasis on the additional risks, uncertainties and difficulties of business conducted across national boundaries; examines the financial, management, legal accounting and marketing areas.

BUS 494         Independent Study in Business (3).

Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and of the business administration advisement coordinator.

Independent research or other study under the direction of a full-time faculty member of the Business Administration Program. CR/NC grading. Repeatable course.

BUS 495         Special Topics in Business (1-3).

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

Advanced seminar on a topic of current interest to the discipline of business administration. Repeatable course. Three hours of seminar per week.

BUS 496         Business Administration Internship (3).

Prerequisites: Upper division status and consent of Internship Coordinator.

Under direction of the Internship Coordinator, students work in a business organization applying skills and knowledge learned in the classroom. CR/NC grading. Repeatable course.

Graduate

Graduate classified standing in the MBA program or consent of the graduate program coordinator is prerequisite to enrollment in graduate (500 level) courses.

 

BUS 594         Independent Study in Business (3).

Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and MBA program coordinator.

Independent research or special projects under the direction of a full-time faculty member of the master of business administration program. CR/NC grading. NOTE: Cannot substitute for a required course or elective.

BUS 595         Selected Topics in Business (1-3).

Prerequisite: Completion of core courses.

A variable topics course in a functional area of business administration or of special interest to business management. New topics will be offered each term. Repeatable course. Three hours of seminar per week.

BUS 600         Graduate Continuation Course (0).

Prerequisite: Consent of graduate program coordinator required.

Graduate students who have completed their course work but not their thesis project or comprehensive examinations or who have other requirements remaining for the completion of their degree may maintain continuous attendance by enrolling in this course.

Information Systems

Lower Division

CIS 270         Information Systems and Technology Fundamentals (3).

Provides an introduction to information technology, systems concepts, and application software. Covers system components and relationships, cost/value and quality of information, and package software solutions. Includes basic skills related to operating systems, word processing, spreadsheet software, and the Internet.

CIS 272         Business Programming I (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 270 or CSC 111 or CSC 121 may be taken concurrently.

Provides an understanding of algorithm development, programming, computer concepts and the design and application of data and file structure. Topics include file processing, data analysis, form design, and report generation.

CIS 275         Introduction to Network-Based Applications (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 270 or CSC 111 or CSC 121 or be taken concurrently.

Introduction to Internet Protocol networks, WWW authoring and design, HTML, multimedia data types, social, and organizational implications of networks.

CIS 276         Personal Productivity with Information Systems Technology (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 270

Enables student to improve their skills as knowledge workers through effective and efficient use of productivity software. Covers advanced features of word processing, spreadsheet, presentation, database, and groupware, including applications development.

Upper Division

CIS 370         Information Systems Theory and Practice (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 270 or CSC 111 or CSC 121.

Provides an introduction to organizational systems, planning, and decision process, and how information is used for decision support in organization. Covers the concepts of information systems for competitive advantage, data as a resource, quality control and reengineering, management and development of systems, and end-user computing.

CIS 371         Business Programming II (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 272.

Analysis, design, and development of business applications using object-oriented programming languages. Topics include GUI interface, application optimization, client/server applications, ad hoc queries, and dynamic link libraries.

CIS 372         Analysis and Logical Design (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 370 may be taken concurrently.

Business computing systems, with emphasis on system analysis; tools and techniques of systems study; problem definition, data requirements and analytical approaches.

CIS 378         Information Security Theories and Practice (3).

Prerequisites: CIS 272 or CIS 275, and CIS 370.

Covers security policies, models, and mechanisms for privacy, integrity, and availability. The business impact of security is also discussed along with countermeasures and best practices used to prevent or mitigate the effects of attacks and malicious code. Various IT security threats and foundation of an overall information security program needed to combat these threats are described.

CIS 471         Advanced, Network-Based Applications (3).

Prerequisites: CIS 275.

Covers network-based applications in commerce and cooperative work. Internet publishing and commerce, Internet Protocol servers, database connectivity, computer support of cooperative work.

CIS 473         Database Systems (3).

Prerequisites: CIS 272 and CIS 370; CIS 272 may be taken concurrently.

Concepts of data structures and data base processing; major approaches to design and implementation of data base applications; discussion of commercial systems.

CIS 474         Systems Development (3).

Prerequisite:  CIS 372 may be taken concurrently.

Business computing systems, with emphasis on systems design; prediction and evaluation of system performance; management information systems and related systems; use of telecommunications in systems design.

CIS 475         Data Communications (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 370.

History and trends of hardware/software for telecommunications; asynchronous and synchronous protocols; codes; case studies of current commercial applications; distributed processing; carriers, services and regulatory agencies; standards; error management; reliability; design and tuning of networks; security.

CIS 476         Advanced Concepts for Business Systems (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 370.

Special topics from modern computing developments. Special emphasis will be given to topics not included in other course offerings (e.g., decision support systems, videotex, etc.). Repeatable course.

CIS 477         Advanced Data Communications (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 370 and CIS 475.

Covers advanced topics required to design, implement, and maintain networks, including the advanced aspects of protocol models, IP addressing, routing, subnetting, and the configuration and operation of network devices.

CIS 478         Firewall and Computer Network Security (3).

Prerequisites: CIS 275 or CIS 475.

Provides an introduction to firewalls and other network security components and elements that can work together to create an in-depth defensive perimeter around a LAN. These include packet filtering, authentication, proxy servers, encryption, bastion, virtual private networks, log file maintenance, and intrusion detection systems. Practical topics in network security include policy and mechanism, malicious code; intrusion detection, prevention, response; cryptographic protocols for privacy and integrity are also covered.

CIS 480         Advanced Database Systems (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 473.

Advanced database concepts such as object-relational database management systems, client/server and n-tier database environments, data warehousing, an Intranet- and Internet-based database systems. Projects include integrated commercial database applications using forms, reports, graphics, and web pages.

CIS 482         Databases and Web Security (3).

Prerequisites: CIS 473 and CIS 478.

This course introduces methods of protecting data:  discretionary and mandatory access controls, secure database design, data integrity, secure architectures, secure transaction processing, information flow controls, inference controls, and auditing.  Security models for relational and object-oriented databases, methods to develop the overall security program necessary to protect data and react to threats as they occur, and  security problems raised by data warehousing and data mining are discussed. Furthermore the course covers Web security including SSL/TLC protocols, HTTPS as it relates to SSL, the most common uses of Instant Messaging application, and the variety of mainstream web tools such as JavaScript, Buffer Overflow, ActiveX, Cookies, Applets, and SMTP that are commonly exploited by attackers on the internet.

CIS 488         Management of Information Security (3).

Prerequisites: CIS 482 or may be taken concurrently.

This course provides a management overview of information security and a thorough treatment of the administration of the information security. Issues based on the management functions of Planning, Policy, People, Project Management, Risk Management, and Risk Protection are discussed. The course also discusses practical methods for 1) developing practical risk assessment procedures that link security to business needs, 2) involving business managers in risk assessment, and 3) managing risk on a continuing basis.

CIS 494         Independent Study in Computer Information Systems (3).

Prerequisites: CIS 372, minimum GPA 3.0, and upper division standing.

Independent research or special project under the direction of a full-time faculty member in the Computer Information Systems Department. CR/NC grading.

CIS 496         Internship in Computer Information Systems (3).

Prerequisites: Minimum GPA 3.0.

A project-type course in computer information systems carried out on an independent basis, with the cooperation of an industrial or governmental concern that is active in the CIS field. Professional report describing project is required. CR/NC grading.

Graduate

Graduate classified standing in the MBA program or consent of the graduate program coordinator is prerequisite to enrollment in graduate (500 level) courses.

CIS 502         Advanced Topics in Information Systems (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 270.

Covers issues of concern to managers in areas such as information processing applications and technology, management of the information processing function, impacts of information technology on the firm and on society, global information systems and the information superhighway.

CIS 503         Information Technology in International Business (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 502 may be taken concurrently.

Applying information technology in international business.  Topics include traditional and Web-based EDI (electronic data interchange), ebXML, global telecommunications, collaborative technology, supply chain management, strategic management of international information systems, legal and cultural challenges to implementing international information systems.

CIS 520         Network-based Applications (3)

Prerequisite: CIS 502 may be taken concurrently.

This course focuses on the applications and implications of networks for individuals, organizations and society.  It covers the historical aspects of networks and their applications, the emerging network applications, and the impact of network applications on individuals, organizations and society.

CIS 530          Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 502 may be taken concurrently.

A theoretical and practical study on enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems, including the architecture and differentiation among major commercial ERP software, ERP relationship to various functional business areas, issues of implementing ERP, and the security and confidentiality issues in ERP.

CIS 540          Data Warehousing and Data Mining (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 502 may be taken concurrently.

This course covers topics in (1) data warehousing, e.g. extracting, cleaning, and organizing data from transactional databases, (2) data mining, e.g. extracting patterns and relationships from the data warehouse, and (3) decision making based on the patterns from the data mining process.

CIS 550          Project Management (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 502 may be taken concurrently.

This course addresses how IT projects should be managed.  Topics include human resources management, communications management, scope management, quality management, scheduling/time management, cost and resource management, risk management, contract/procurement management, and project integration.

CIS 560          Information Security for Management (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 502 may be taken concurrently.

Topics on information security include the legislation and standards, law and ethics, planning for security and contingencies, policies and procedures, security management, network vulnerabilities, firewall, viruses and other malicious code, risk management, protection mechanisms and current problems in system security.

CIS 575          SAP Supply Chain (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 530 and OMG 510

This course will teach the student how to use SAP software to structure and implement solutions to various aspects of supply chain operations.  Among the topics to be covered will be demand and supply planning, procurement, manufacturing, warehousing, order fulfillment, and transportation.

CIS 580          IT Management Capstone Project (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 502 and completion of at least 3 electives.

In this course, students tackle real life IT management projects.  Emphases are on applying theoretical frameworks to align enterprise IT and business strategies, and on integrating and applying knowledge and skills that they have acquired from the previous course work.

CIS 594          Independent Study in Computer Information Systems (3).

Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor and MBA program coordinator.

Independent research or other study under the direction of a full-time faculty member of the Computer Information Systems Department. CR/NC grading. Repeatable course.

CIS 595          Selected Topics In Computer Information Systems (3).

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and CIS 502.

Intensive study of a specialized area of Computer Information Systems on a selected topic of particular interest to faculty and students. Three hours of seminar per week. Specific topic listed in class schedule. Repeatable course.

Finance

Upper Division

FIN 360          Business Finance (3).

Prerequisite: ACC 230, ECO 210, and one of the following, MAT 105, MAT, 131, MAT 153, MAT 171, MAT 191, or MAT 193.

A survey of the decision framework for financial management; forecasting and planning, major investment and financing decisions, control and interaction with capital markets.

FIN 375          Personal Financial Planning (3).

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Provides an understanding of personal finance issues relating to budgeting, planning credit, retirement planning, insurance investments, and estate planning. Students will be able to adopt principles studied to their personal lives and make better decisions.

FIN 382          Financial Analysis I (3).

Prerequisite: FIN 360.

Readings and case studies in financial theory and practice relating to financial statement analysis, budgeting, working capital management; computer applications.

FIN 425          Security Analysis (3).

Prerequisite: FIN 360; FIN 468 is recommended.

Students will learn the rational, rigorous analysis that is needed to evaluate securities and to answer the most important question: Are securities fairly valued? Students will also learn how to value securities, diversification and performance evaluation of portfolios.

FIN 467          Real Estate Finance and Investment (3).

Prerequisite: FIN 360.

Practical analysis of financial techniques and investment opportunities and procedures for real property; investigation of costs, returns, profitability, tax implications, depreciation, financial institutions, markets, instruments, agencies of real estate finance, uses of computerized analysis.

FIN 468          Seminar in Investment Analysis (3).

Prerequisite: FIN 360.

Security analysis, valuation and portfolio management; emphasis on investment criteria, sources of information, types of financial investments. Three hours of seminar per week.

FIN 480          Economics of the Firm (3).

Prerequisites: ECO 210, ECO 211 and OMG 321.

Applications of economic theory to management decisions; emphasis on analysis and quantitative techniques appropriate for solving forecasting, production, cost and pricing problems under various market conditions; computer applications when appropriate.

FIN 481          Financial Institutions Management (3).

Prerequisite: FIN 360.

Management of financial institutions, including principles, practices and procedures financing, international capital asset pricing model and ethical concerns. Case analysis, oral/written presentation and computer usage required.

FIN 483          Financial Analysis II (3).

Prerequisite: FIN 382.

Readings and case studies in financial theory and practice relating to investment decisions, mergers and acquisitions, multinational finance, computer applications.

FIN 484          Business Forecasting (3).

Prerequisites: FIN 360 and OMG 321.

Techniques for estimation of sales, investment, working capital, inventories and labor requirements; naive forecasts, moving averages, exponential smoothing, regression techniques, and time series analysis.

FIN 485          Entrepreneurial Finance (3).

Prerequisite: FIN 360.

This course focuses on the unique financing issues as they relate to starting and managing a new business venture or a small business.  The course covers topics such as sources of capital for start-ups, financial planning for growing businesses, venture capital, and Initial Public Offerings.

FIN 488          Multinational Financial Transactions (3).

Prerequisite: FIN 360.

Short term export and import financing, including the fundamentals of foreign exchange, commercial drafts, and letters of credit; international banking procedures, private and public sources, and problems of risk and security.

FIN 494          Independent Study in Finance (3).

Independent study of particular topics in Finance under the direction of a full time member of the Finance Department. CR/NC grading.

FIN 496          Internship in Finance (3).

Under the direction of the Internship Coordinator, students work in a business organization applying the skills and knowledge learned in the classroom. CR/NC grading.

Graduate

Graduate classified standing in the MBA program or consent of the graduate program coordinator is prerequisite to enrollment in graduate (500 level) courses.

FIN 500          Advanced Topics in Finance (3).

Prerequisite: FIN 360.

Analysis of decisions in financial management. Includes financial planning, working capital management, capital budgeting, valuation analysis, portfolio management, capital structure, ethical and multinational concerns. Case analysis, oral/written presentation and computer usage required.

FIN 502          Advanced Topics in International Business (3).

Prerequisite: FIN 360.

Exploration of issues related to all functional areas within a global business environment. Emphasizes the additional opportunities, risks, uncertainties and difficulties of conducting business across national boundaries. Case analysis, oral/written presentation and computer usage required.

FIN 503          Advanced Topics in Multinational Finance (3).

Prerequisite: FIN 502.

Financial decision making in global setting: financial systems, Euro-currency markets, balance of payments, foreign exchange markets, risk measurement, hedging, trade.

FIN 504          Corporate Finance-Valuation Approach (3).

Prerequisite: FIN 500.

Principles of valuation; projecting earnings; discounting future cash flows; the price/earnings method; dividend discount model; market value vs. replacement value; the role of premiums when buying public companies; financing alternatives.

FIN 505          Advanced Management of Financial Institutions (3).

Prerequisite: FIN 500.

An examination of the nature and role of financial institutions in the economy, money markets, and capital markets, the Federal Reserve System and monetary policy, the commercial banking system, thrift institutions, insurance companies, pension funds, investment companies, and other major financial institutions.

FIN 506          Investment and Portfolio Management (3).

Prerequisite: FIN 500.

An overview of the investment environment for the institutional money manager. The market mechanism, market equilibrium, the relationship between risk and return and the valuation of various investment instruments are investigated. Analyzes contemporary theories and techniques of security selection and management available to the institution portfolio manager.

FIN 507          Derivatives and Future Markets (3).

Prerequisite: FIN 500.

Futures markets; mechanics of buying and selling futures; options; pricing of options; hedging; regulation of futures markets; stock index futures; interest rate futures; interest rate and other swaps.

FIN 595          Selected Topics in Finance (3).

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and FIN 500.

Intensive study of a specialized area of Finance on a selected topic of particular interest to faculty and students. Three hours of seminar per week. Specific topic listed in class schedule. Repeatable course.

Human Resources Management

Upper Division

HRM 313         Human Resource Management (3).

Prerequisite: MGT 310.

Current theory and practice of the personnel function in organizations. Includes job analysis, recruiting, selection, training and development, compensation, performance evaluation and contemporary quality of work life issues and job redesign; uses case analysis, lecture and role-playing.

HRM 316         Labor and Industrial Relations (3).

Prerequisite: MGT 310.

The Labor/Management process in private sector organizations; development of employee organizations; collective bargaining; contract administration; labor law, labor economics; role of the NLRB and the FMCS; case analysis and role-playing.

HRM 321         Designing Compensation Systems and Incentive Plans (3).

Prerequisite: HRM 313.

Focuses on best practices in compensation, particularly how to design effective compensation systems. Topics will include legal aspects of compensation and design of base pay systems, incentive plans, and benefit packages.

HRM 425         Seminar in Strategic Human Resources Management (3).

Prerequisite: MGT 310.

Integrates human resource management functions from the strategic perspective, dealing with environments, Human Resources Management (HRM) strategies, HR planning, legal issues, and labor relations in combination with basic HRM functions. Focuses on both theoretical and practical aspects.

Graduate

Graduate classified standing in the MBA program or consent of the graduate program coordinator is prerequisite to enrollment in graduate (500 level) courses.

HRM 520         Essentials of Human Resource Management: Job Analysis,
Staffing, Training and Development (3).

Prerequisites: MGT 500 or concurrent enrollment.

Focuses on best practices in essential areas of human resource management: job analysis, recruiting, selection, training and development. Students learn how to develop effective HR selection practices, as well as training programs and career paths that motivate employees.

HRM 521         Compensation and Benefits (3).

Prerequisites: HRM 520 and MGT 500.

Focuses on best practices in compensation. Students will learn how to design effective compensation plans and policies, as well as laws regarding pay and benefits.

HRM 525         Strategic Human Resource Management (3).

Prerequisites: HRM 520 and HRM 521 (HRM 521 may be taken concurrently).

Focuses on strategic aspects of human resource management, including strategic perspectives on human resources, labor relations, legal issues and global human resource management. Uses both a theoretical approach and real work-setting case application.

Law

Lower Division

LAW 240         Legal Environment of Business (3).

Analysis of the legal process; functions and operations within a federal system; contracts; sales; tort liability as it impacts business; government regulation of business.

Upper Division

LAW 340         Law of Business Organizations (3).

Legal consequences of selection of one form of business organization over another; analysis of the law of corporations, partnerships, and agencies; law of the workplace; corporate ethics and social responsibilities.

LAW 342         Employment Law (3).

Prerequisites: LAW 240 is recommended.

Overview of the laws impacting the workplace; anti-discrimination law; employee safety, health and privacy; the employer-employee contract; labor law; regulatory agencies; retirement compensation; other statutory rights.

Graduate

Graduate classified standing in the MBA program or consent of the graduate program coordinator is prerequisite to enrollment in graduate (500 level) courses.

 

LAW 595         Special Topics in Law (3).

Prerequisites: Graduate Standing.

Intensive study of a specialized area of Law on a selected topic of particular interest to faculty and students. Three hours of seminar per week. Specific topic listed in class schedule. Repeatable course.

Management

Upper Division

MGT 310         Management Theory (3).

Focuses on the management processes of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling; includes discussions of social and ethical issues in business; case studies and written reports.

MGT 312         Organizational Behavior (3).

Prerequisite: MGT 310.

Causes and consequences of individual and group behavior in business, organizational communications, interpersonal relations, and conflict resolution; cases and role-playing.

MGT 412         Small Business Management (3).

Prerequisites: ACC 230, MGT 310 and MKT 350.

Role of small business in America; project- oriented activities include establishing, financing and operating independent businesses; designed to develop entrepreneurial skills and insights into managing a small business.

MGT 416         Leadership (3).

Prerequisite: MGT 312.

An in-depth analysis of theories and practice of leadership. Course is designed to give the student an understanding of the leadership skills, styles, and behavior in a variety of managerial roles.

MGT 418         Seminar in Comparative Management Systems (3).

Prerequisite: MGT 310.

Study of management processes such as planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling under conditions other than those found today in the United States . Countries studied vary from year to year; case analysis and class projects. Three hour of seminar per week.

MGT 430         Strategic Communication (3).

Development of effective strategic communication plans, including identification of key audiences and issues.  Formulation of key messages, tactics, timeline, budget and evaluation.  Exploration of the changing environment for business, reputation, corporate advertising, media, internal communications, government relations, and crisis communication.

MGT 490         Strategic Management Seminar (3).

Prerequisites: Completion of all business core courses; BUS 445 may be taken concurrently (priority will be given to graduating seniors).

An integrating capstone course dealing with problems of business management; uses actual business cases for analysis and decision-making.

MGT 494         Independent Study in Management (3).

Prerequisite: Completion of at least two management concentration courses and approval of the Department Chair.

Independent study of particular topics in Management under the direction of a full-time faculty member of the Business Administration Program. CR/NC grading. Repeatable course.

MGT 495         Special Topics in Management (3).

Prerequisites: MGT 310.

Study of a current topic in Management. Repeatable course. MGT 496 Internship in Management (3)

MGT 496         Internship in Management (3).

Prerequisite: Completion of at least two management concentration courses and approval of the Department Chair.

Under the direction of the Internship Coordinator, students work in a business organization applying skills and knowledge learned in the classroom. CR/NC grading. Repeatable course.

Graduate

Graduate classified standing in the MBA program or consent of the graduate program coordinator is prerequisite to enrollment in graduate (500 level) courses.

 

MGT 500         Human Behavior in Organizations (3).

Prerequisite: MGT 310.

An experiential course designed to teach management skills such as conflict resolution, motivation, leadership, and communication, as well as the functioning of groups. Case analysis and oral/written presentations required.

MGT 503         Advanced Topics in International Management (3).

Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Applies international management practices and managerial behavior to decision making. Topics will include national differences in culture, strategies for communicating, cooperating across cultures, and managing global operations. Case analysis and oral/written presentations required.

MGT 512         Seminar in Entrepreneurship (3).

Prerequisite: MGT 500.

Provides an understanding of the entrepreneur and the entrepreneurial process. Emphasis on new venture planning and establishment of new firms. The distinctive focus is enterprise creation. Case studies and “live” discussions with small business owners and successful entrepreneurs are featured.

MGT 516         Leadership (3).

Prerequisite: MGT 500.

Builds on knowledge of leadership provided in the human behavior course, expands the scope and depth of knowledge of leadership theories, provides practice in basic leadership skills, and develops the student’s self-knowledge of his or her preferred leadership styles.

MGT 590         Strategic Management (3).

Prerequisite: Must be taken during the last semester in residence.

Strategy, leadership from middle to top management perspective. Use of cases, readings, simulations to integrate functional fields of business. Requires team activities, strategy formulation/implementation, serving purpose of comprehensive project. Case analysis, oral/written presentation and computer usage required.

MGT 594         Independent Study in Management (3).

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and completion of MGT 500.

Independent study of particular topics in management under the direction of a full-time faculty member of the Business Administration Program. CR/NC grading. Repeatable course.

MGT 595         Special Topics in Management (3).

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and completion of MGT 500.

Intensive study of a specialized area in management on a selected topic of particular interest to faculty and students. Intended for students with senior or graduate standing. Specific topic listed in class schedule. Repeatable course.

Marketing

Upper Division

MKT 350         Principles of Marketing (3).

Prerequisite: ECO 210 recommended.

Survey of the marketing function, including the marketing environment and target markets; marketing strategy with emphasis on the marketing mix; social and ethical responsibilities of marketing.

MKT 351         Sales Management and Sales Techniques (3).

Prerequisite: MKT 350.

Organizing, motivating and controlling the activities of the sales force. Developing the knowledge and skills of professional selling useful for accomplishing career objectives; cases and role playing required.

MKT 352         Advertising and Promotion Management (3).

Prerequisite: MKT 350.

Management and coordination of advertising, marketing public relations, and sales promotion; case analysis and presentations.

MKT 353         Retail Marketing Management (3).

Prerequisite: MKT 350.

Selecting store location, layout, merchandise goods, assortments, and selling to target market, including sales growth through direct marketing, franchising and acquisition; cases and field research required.

MKT 355         Consumer Behavior (3).

Prerequisite: MKT 350 (may be taken concurrently).

Consumer buying patterns, motivation, and search behavior; consumer decision-making process; interdisciplinary concepts from economics, sociology, psychology, cultural anthropology, and mass communications; case analysis and research projects.

MKT 358         International Marketing (3).

Prerequisite: MKT 350.

Analysis of international marketing problems including economic, social, cultural, technological, political, geographic and competitive forces; cases and projects.

MKT 445         New Product Management (3).

Prerequisite: MKT 350.

Focuses on product/service decisions and development processes. Covers the role of new products in marketing and corporate management, along with product policy concepts - product life cycle and product positioning. Case analysis, oral/written presentation and computer usage required.

MKT 450         Internet Marketing (3).

Prerequisites: MKT 350.

The principal focus of this course will be on understanding the marketing implications on internet marketing. Students will learn how internet marketing differs from traditional marketing and determine the role of marketing functions in internet programs; cases and projects.

MKT 451         Trade Show and Event Marketing (3).

Prerequisite: MKT 350.

How to create and manage trade shows, exhibits, and events successfully. Students will learn how to organize, plan, strategize, execute, and measure trade shows and events. Focuses on how to improve marketing productivity and effectiveness.

MKT 452         Sports and Entertainment Marketing (3).

Prerequisites: MKT 350.

Theory and practice of the strategic marketing processes applied to sports and entertainment enterprises; planning marketing mixes; market selection decisions; distribution strategies; media mergers and acquisitions; cross platform marketing; regulation issues; sponsorships and events; readings and case studies.

MKT 454         Marketing Research (3).

Prerequisites: MKT 350 and OMG 321.

The marketing research process with an emphasis on cost versus value of information for decision-making: problem formulation, research design, sources of research data, measurement techniques and data collection, sampling techniques, data analysis, interpretation, and reporting; term research projects.

MKT 459         Seminar in Marketing Management (3).

Prerequisites: Prior completion of at least four courses from the Marketing concentration;  MKT 355, MKT 454, FIN 360 and OMG 322 are recommended.

Comprehensive analysis of marketing management problems, functions, and the decision-making process; emphasis on the case method as related to problems of product, price, distribution and promotion.

MKT 494         Independent Study in Marketing (3).

Prerequisite: Completion of at least two marketing concentration courses and approval of the Department of Marketing Chair.

Independent study of particular topics in Marketing under the direction of a full-time faculty member of the Marketing Department. CR/NC grading. Repeatable course.

MKT 495         Special Topics in Marketing (3).

Prerequisite: MKT 350.

Study of a current topic in Marketing. Repeatable course.

MKT 496         Internship in Marketing (3).

Prerequisite: Completion of at least two marketing concentration courses and approval of the Department of Marketing Chair.

Under the direction of the Internship Coordinator, students work in a business organization applying skills and knowledge learned in the classroom. CR/NC grading. Repeatable course.

Graduate

Graduate classified standing in the MBA program or consent of the graduate program coordinator is prerequisite to enrollment in graduate (500 level) courses.

MKT 500         Marketing Management (3).

Prerequisite: MKT 350.

Current topics in strategic marketing: strategic planning, market resource allocation, buying behavior, forecasting, product positioning. Social, legal, ethical and global issues in marketing will be explored. Case analysis oral/written presentations and computer usage required.

MKT 501         Marketing Information Management (3).

Prerequisite: MKT 500.

Learn important tools and databases needed by marketers for decision-making. The course explores the applications of marketing information as a competitive tool. Also covers marketing research tools and processes. Case analysis, oral/written presentation and computer usage required.

MKT 503         International Marketing: Cases and Current Issues (3).

Prerequisite: MKT 500.

Current topics in international marketing. Topics include strategic planning, global environmental variables, marketing research in international markets, export and import process and negotiations.

MKT 510         Business-to-Business Marketing (3).

Prerequisite: MKT 501 or concurrent enrollment.

Focuses on the strategies used for marketing products and services to commercial, institutional, and governmental markets. Case analysis, oral/written presentation and computer usage required.

MKT 512         Seminar in Services Marketing (3).

Prerequisite: MKT 501 or concurrent enrollment.

Examines the marketing and managerial implications of the differences between goods and services. Covers many service marketing concepts, including the relationship between the service provider and customer, the real-time process experience of services, customer satisfaction and service quality.

MKT 530         Negotiation and Persuasive Presentation (3).

Prerequisite: MKT 501 or concurrent enrollment.

Introduces students to the best principles used in marketing negotiations. Students will understand characteristics of a good negotiator; critical elements in negotiations, strategies and tactics used for and against. Also includes improving communication through personal presentation.

MKT 531         Sales Management (3).

Prerequisite: MKT 501 or concurrent enrollment.

Discusses the strategic and tactical aspects of sales force management. Appropriate for students interested in careers in sales management or management positions in companies whose revenues and profits depend on a productive sales force.

MKT 545         Seminar in New Product Development (3).

Prerequisite: MKT 501 or concurrent enrollment.

Focuses on product/service decisions and development processes. Covers the role of new products in marketing and corporate management, along with product policy concepts - product life cycle and product positioning. Case analysis, oral/written presentation and computer usage required.

MKT 550         Internet Marketing (3).

Prerequisite: MKT 501 or concurrent enrollment.

Focuses on the marketing functions as they pertain to Internet Marketing, including the Internet marketing environment and target markets; marketing strategy with an emphasis on the marketing mix; social and ethical responsibilities. Case analysis, oral/written presentation and computer usage required.

MKT 555         Seminar in Consumer Behavior (3).

Prerequisite: MKT 501 may be taken concurrently.

Focuses on managerial concerns related to the understanding of consumer buying patterns, motivations, and search behavior; consumer-decision making process; interdisciplinary concepts from economics, sociology, psychology, cultural anthropology, and mass communication.

MKT 560 Brand Management (3).

Prerequisite: MKT 500.

The course explores the field of brand management through the use of case studies of leading marketers and their strategies for effectively building and managing brands.  Topics include brand building, positioning, measuring, and managing brand equity.

MKT 580         Strategic Marketing (3).

Prerequisites: MKT 501 and three marketing electives; one marketing elective may be taken concurrently.

Provides a comprehensive framework for the application of marketing concepts to the development and implementation of marketing strategy. Emphasizes the development of an effective marketing plan. Competitive computer simulation, case analysis, oral/written presentation and computer usage required.

MKT 594         Independent Study in Marketing (3).

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and completion of MKT 500.

Independent study of particular topics in Marketing under the direction of a full-time faculty member of the Business Administration Program. CR/NC grading. Repeatable course.

MKT 595         Special Topics in Marketing (3).

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and completion of MKT 500.

Intensive study of a specialized area in marketing on a selected topic of particular interest to faculty and students. Intended for students with a senior or graduate standing. Specific topic listed in class schedule. Repeatable course.

MKT 596         Internship in Marketing (3).

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and completion of MKT 500.

Under the direction of the Internship Coordinator, students work in a business organization applying skills and knowledge learned in the classroom. CR/NC grading. Repeatable course.

Operations Management

Lower Division

OMG 220        Introduction to Transportation Management (3).

Introduction to the alternative modes, systems, rates, services, and regulations in global transport including ocean, air, and surface carriers and systems.

OMG 221        Introduction to Business Statistics (3).

An introductory course covering fundamentals of modern statistical methods.  Topics include descriptive statistics, probability rules and laws, the binomial and normal distributions, sampling and sampling distributions, estimation, and hypothesis testing.

OMG 225        Introduction to Logistics Management (3).

Introduction to logistics concepts and systems, including inventory and warehouse management, logistics information systems, facility location, and global logistics.

OMG 230        Introduction to Supply Chain Management (3).

This course is an overview of the entire supply chain and its key elements.  It covers basic concepts and terminology used in demand planning, inventory planning, material planning, distribution planning, fulfillment planning, and related components of a supply chain.

Upper Division

OMG 321        Business Statistics (3).

Prerequisite: MAT 131, or OMG 221.

Topics include inferential statistics, analysis of variance, multiple regression, time series forecasting and their application in business decision making process.  Excel and/or a statistical software will be used throughout the course.

OMG 322        Operations Management (3).

Prerequisite: OMG 321.

Analysis of the management function in the production area with emphasis on computer applications and practical problem-solving. Includes international developments.

OMG 420        Global Transportation Management (3).

Prerequisite: OMG 220 and OMG 321.

This course provides advanced study of alternative modes, systems, rates, and regulations in global transport including ocean, air, and surface carriers.  It also includes analysis of problems concerning the distribution of consumer products, including environmental, social, and political issues.

OMG 423        Introduction to Operations Research (3).

Prerequisite: OMG 321.

Use of deterministic, probabilistic, and computer-based methods in support of management decision-making with emphasis on computer applications and practical problems.

OMG 425        Logistics Management (3).

Prerequisite: OMG 225 and OMG 321.

This course covers advanced topics in managing of logistics systems including inventory control, distribution network analysis, facility location analysis, and storage of materials and the warehousing finished goods.

OMG 430        Supply Chain Management (3).

Prerequisites: OMG 230 and OMG 322.

Advanced study of all activities associated with the flow and transformation of goods from the raw material stage (extraction), through to the end user, as well as the associated information flow.

Graduate

Graduate classified standing in the MBA program or consent of the graduate program coordinator is prerequisite to enrollment in graduate (500 level) courses.

 

OMG 502        Advanced Topics in Operations Management (3).

Prerequisite: OMG 321 or equivalent.

Management of operations process including production and service aspects. Topics include capacity and location planning, scheduling, facility layout, project and inventory management quality improvement. Behavioral, multinational ethical issues will be considered. Case analysis, oral/written presentation and computer usage required.

OMG 510        Logistics Application (3).

This course introduces students to various logistics application areas.  Key areas to be covered include:  warehouse management; pipeline management; inventory management; distribution; scheduling; freight consolidation and forwarding; international aspects of logistics; ocean/land carrier logistics; fleet operations; site location; and tariffs.

OMG 520        Logistics Case Studies (3).

This course will expose students to transportation and logistics case studies in logistics such as United Parcel service, Dell, Ford, Cathay Pacific, Royal Caribbean Cruises, etc. Students will be exposed to logistics problems faced by major companies and how they were solved.

OMG 580        Logistics Management Capstone (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 575 and OMG 520.

In this course, students tackle real life Logistics management projects.  Emphases are on applying theoretical frameworks to align enterprise Logistics and business strategies, and on integrating and applying knowledge and skills that they have acquired from the previous course work.

OMG 595        Selected Topics in Quantitative Methods (3).

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and OMG 502.

Intensive study of a specialized area of quantitative methods on a selected topic of particular interest to faculty and students. Three hours of seminar per week. Specific topic listed in class schedule. Repeatable course.

Sports, Entertainment and Hospitality Management

Upper Division

SEH 310          Sports, Entertainment, and Hospitality Management (3).

Overview of the sports, entertainment, and hospitality fields. Examines the current issues, trends, and problems in these fields. Includes an investigation into career opportunities and growth potential for the sports, entertainment, and hospitality industries.

SEH 330          Managing Sports Facilities (3).

Prerequisite: SEH 310.

Provides students with an introduction to the planning and management of sports facilities. Focuses on elements of planning, design, and management, while examining functions related to maintenance, security, operations and evaluation.

SEH 348          Principles of Travel and Tourism (3).

Prerequisite: SEH 310.

Study of historical and modern principles of travel and tourism. Exploration of societal trends, global tourist behavior, and environmental factors influencing the destination mix. Investigation of tourism planning, promotion.

SEH 448          Hotel and Resort Management (3).

Prerequisite: SEH 310.

Investigation of management in the hospitality industry with emphasis on food service, lodging, tourism, and contemporary issues. Examines customer service, international markets, human resources, marketing, and fiscal implications. Field trips required.

SEH 495          Special Topics in Hospitality Management (3).

Prerequisite: SEH 310.

Study of a current topic in the entertainment industry.

Lower Division

SOM 201         Strategies for College and Career Success (3).

Explores empowering students to control and shape their own education and careers. Topics include: setting goals, planning, time management, doing well on exams, taking advantage of University resources, writing papers, understanding professors, career choice, the employer’s perspective, job success.

Infrequently Offered Courses

The following courses are scheduled on a “demand” basis. Students should consult the department office for information about the next schedule offering.

CIS 478                      Data Processing Applications in Business (3).

Prerequisite: CIS 374.

Study of CASE approach into design and implementation of business data processing applications and systems; team design work; uses of the computer in modeling and analyzing business problems.

FIN 427          Financing E-Business (3).

Prerequisite: FIN 360.

An overview of financing options available to E-Business operations. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing financing alternatives specific to E-Business, and issues in raising financing at all stages of operations. Course includes reading assignments, case studies, and Internet applications.

LAW 440         Legal Issues in E-Commerce (3).

Prerequisites: LAW 240.

This course covers the legal aspects of doing business on-line. Topics covered will include: on-line contracts, e-crimes, privacy, intellectual property, e-commerce taxation and e-payment systems.

 

MGT 419         Managing an E-Business (3).

Prerequisite: MGT 310, senior status, completion of E-Commerce core or consent of instructor.

The managerial implications of conducting E-Business. Introduces new business models and strategies used by E-Business and their impacts on organizational culture. Group exercises, case studies, and team projects required.

MGT 491         Business Consulting Practicum (3).

Prerequisites: Senior Status and completion of all business core courses. BUS 445, FIN 480, and OMG 423 may be taken concurrently (priority will given to graduating seniors).

Business capstone courses offered in conjunction with Small Business Administration. Student teams participate in solution of actual business problems; field work required.

MGT 492         E-Commerce Practicum (3).

An integrating practicum course dealing with all aspects of E-Commerce management; cases, lectures, and projects.

MKT 353         Retail Marketing Management (3).

Prerequisite: MKT 350.

Selecting store location, layout, merchandise goods, assortments, and selling to target market, including sales growth through direct marketing, franchising and acquisition; cases and field research required. 

OMG 426        Production Planning and Control (3).

Prerequisite: OMG 322.

Techniques and systems for planning, scheduling, and controlling production.

OMG 427        Quality Management (3).

Prerequisite: OMG 321.

Basic elements of quality management are presented. Quality management related to wide areas of business activities are discussed. This includes not only the quality control of manufactured products but also various kinds of service activities such as quality management of finance, accounting and marketing departments of manufacturing companies as well as hospitals, airlines, trucking companies, governments, schools, accounting firms and law firms.

OMG 428        Purchasing and Procurement (3).

Prerequisite: OMG 322.

Examines activities directed to securing the materials, supplies, equipment and services required for the proper and efficient functioning of a business, including related planning and policy issues.

OMG 429        Service Operations Management (3).

The course emphasis is on the design and operations of service delivery firms as well as service delivery functions within manufacturing firms. It includes topics such as strategic planning and design techniques, principles of delivering quality service, managing capacity and demand, managing information, techniques for improving quality of service operations processes and customer services, and the human dimension in service management.