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AIDS in Africa

Index to AIDS in Africa Thesis

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California State University, Dominguez Hills
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Soka University Japan, Transcend Art and Peace
Created: January 31, 2002
Latest Update: February 2, 2002

E-Mail jeannecurran@habermas.org

Introduction

By Jolie Gibbs

Copyright: Jeanne Curran, Susan R. Takata, and Jolie Gibbs: February 2002.
and Individual Authors. "Fair Use" encouraged.

On Saturday, February 2, 2002, Jolie Gibbs wrote:

Hi Jeanne, I reviewed your comments on my thesis project. thanks for the feed back.

A few questions you asked me:

  1. What is my main focus?

    My main focus is to put together a learning project about women with AIDS in Africa from the experience of someone who lives in Zambia (Father Mobe) and support his opinions with written and web based info. I forgot to incorporate Father Mobe in my abstract and I do need to rewrite and clarify, good thing this is a rough draft.

  2. Why did I pick such a big project?

    I feel it is very important to understand the cultural and social differences which may predispose African Women to AIDS, I have always had a love affair with Africa for some reason and I think this is a personal problem that has turned into a public issue for Africa.

On Saturday, February 2, 2002, jeanne responded:

Good answers, Jolie.

1. What is my main focus- my main focus is to put together a learning project about women with AIDS in Africa from the experience of someone who lives in Zambia (Father Mobe) and support his opinions with written and web based info. I forgot to incorporate Father Mobe in my abstract and I do need to rewrite and clarify, good thing this is a rough draft.
OK, but don't bother about the abstract, because the project will change a little as it grows.

Let's just start an introduction, with something like:

This thesis project develops "a learning project about women with AIDS in Africa from the experience of someone who lives in Zambia (Father Mobe)." The project will "support his opinions with written and web based info." Father Mobe is . . . .

See, there's a first paragraph!

2. Why did I pick such a big project? I feel it is very important to understand the cultural and social differences which may predispose Afican Women to AIDS. I have always had a love affair with Africa for some reason and I think this is a personal problem that has turned into a public issue for Africa.

How about a second paragraph like:

"Why did I pick such a big project? I feel it is very important to understand the cultural and social differences which may predispose African Women to AIDS. I have always had a love affair with Africa for some reason." AIDS is "a personal problem that has turned into a public issue for Africa." This thesis project offers me an opportunity to explore how personal tragedy has crossed into the public sphere, and how we in the US can translate our empathy into some kind of ameliorative action.

A learning project that combines the perspectives of a local resident, like Father Mobe, who has chosen a path of making life better for his people, supported by the theoretical and data-based background available to us through academic research, should prove a useful tool to those who wish to understand. My hope is that it will also provide a useful tool for teaching.

How about something like that? Have I actively reflected what you're saying to me? Try making this into a couple of introductory paragraphs, editing to your own ideas, since I'm just trying to sketch them out from what you're telling me.



What do I do next? Well, I'd suggest you write up Father Mobe's story. I'd like to hear your perspective on that because I have only my own memory of his story. From that, we'll be able to sort out a literature review.

See, we'll edit as we go. Step by step. It's easier this way.

lnp, jeanne