Link to Sponsoring Departments On One Foot: A Middle East Guide for the Preplexed

Dear Habermas Logo and Link to Site Index A Justice Site



The Palestine-Israel Debacle

MIRROR SITES: CSUDH - Habermas - UWP
ISSUES AND CONCEPTS: Susan's Archive at UWP
Academic Resources - Daily Site Additions
Lectures - Notes - Texts - Self Tests - Discussions
Visual Sociology - Graduate Exam Study
POST TO: Tutoring - Learning Records - Transform-dom
SEARCH: Topics Index - Site Index - Issue Archives
Google Web Search - Google Site Search

California State University, Dominguez Hills
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Created: March 9, 2006
Latest Update: March 9, 2006

E-Mail Icon jeannecurran@habermas.org
takata@uwp.edu

Index of Topics on Site title

While on another search for something we needed, I came across this book, which is available online and free for your reading. It's short, easy to browse through, and seems to have a good index and bibliography.

On One Foot: A Middle-East Guide for the perplexed. This looks like a good quick reference on the Israeli perspective of the Palestine Israel Debacle. jeanne

If you are looking for an explanation you can cram into discretionary time, try this. I'll try to set up some questions, as we encounter this issue on transform_dom. jeanne

Discussion Questions

  1. Does On One Foot offer the truth about Palestine and Israel?

    Consider what you mean by "truth." On One Foot offers the Israeli perspective. Remember that perspective matters. I'll try to balance this with a similar kind of quick review on the Palestinian perspective if I can find one for you. Suggestions welcome.

  2. What should you bear in mind about emotional learning if you give one of the "on one foot" answers in haste to a friend?

    Consider that emotions are very high on this issue, that we have very little access to overviews that give non-biased views of the conflict, if there are in fact such things as non-biased perspectives, and that you may offend a friend if you suggest in your attitude or words that your friend doesn't "know" the facts, but you do. Remember that that's not a good basis for an illocutionary discourse.

References:



Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License.
Individual copyrights by other authors may apply.