Link to What's New This Week Index for Concpets included in Fall 2003 Readings and Lectures

Dear Habermas Logo and Link to Site Index A Justice Site



Concepts

Mirror Sites:
CSUDH - Habermas - UWP - Archives

California State University, Dominguez Hills
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Soka University Japan - Transcend Art and Peace
Created: September 5, 2003
Latest Update: September 7, 2003

E-Mail Icon jeannecurran@habermas.org
takata@uwp.edu

Index of Topics on Site Index for Concepts Included in
Fall 2003 Readings and Lectures

General Theory for Class Discussions, All Classes

  • answerability: Briefly, answerability is the recognition and consideration of the fact that every utterance (or act) in which we engage for communication is received by an Other who has the same human power of utterance that we do and is in this sense free to answer us. Bakhtin uses the term in the sense of What shall I say, when there is an Other who may answer me? This implies that we are not free of the consequences of utterances that neglect to consider that question and the Other's possible answers.

    The Aesthetics of Answerability and Dialogical Answerability in Hierarchical Institutions give more complex readings of answerability. You might also want to look for some advanced theory at The Other, Otherness, and Alterity On the Postcolonial Web.

    riskiness of answering: It is risky to answer someone with decision-making power over you when your are not sure that that answerability will be taken as simple communication and a communicative act. It is risky because communication is normatively expected to go from the higher status rank to the lower, not from the lower status rank to the higher. Street Corner Society, William Foote Whyte. "Whyte's study of urban young men in "Cornerville," an Italian neighborhood in Boston, conducted between 1937 and 1940 ..." Classic sociological dissertation from the '30s.

  • discretionary time: Time left over for you to decide how to spend, after the essentials, food, house, clothes, child care, family obligations, work are out of the way. For most of us there's not much of this kind of time today. We are more used to seeing this as "discretionary income," what's left over for you to spend after the essentials, housing, food, clothing, family needs, have been taken care of. Notice that the greater you income, the greater the discretion you will have, for more time and more money will be left over for your discretionary choices.

  • dominant discourse: Dominant discourse is very similar to "les idees dans l'air." It's what you would expect to hear people saying in the grocery market checkout line. It's the discourse that accepts and reflects the position of people in power who make most of the country's decisions in legislatures and courts. But our schools and our institutions generally socialize to reflect and accept the decisions of the decision-makers, including war.

    See Idees dans l'Air or Dominant Discourse Sample Submissions.

  • normative expectations: The French used to refer to normative expectations as "les idees dans l'air." Things that everybody knows. We expect that people will come to work on time, pay for the things they buy, study if they go to school, vote democratic if they believe that government should provide a safety net for everyone. Normative here refers to what the average person would do or expect. Important to remember that there is considerable affect attached to a violation of normative expectations. Imagine the result if you were to wear a bikini to class.

Agencies Class:

  • answerability: Briefly, answerability is the recognition and consideration of the fact that every utterance (or act) in which we engage for communication is received by an Other who has the same human power of utterance that we do and is in this sense free to answer us. Bakhtin uses the term in the sense of What shall I say, when there is an Other who may answer me? This implies that we are not free of the consequences of utterances that neglect to consider that question and the Other's possible answers.

Knowingness Class:

Statistics Class:

  • nominal data: Nominal data are data that can be named only, with no hierarchical indication in the measurement.
      Samples:

    • Democrats, Greens, Independents, Republicans
      Variable: political party
    • Black, White, Brown, Other
      Variable: race
    • Catholics, Muslims, Protestants, Buddhists, Hindus, Others
      Variable: religious preference

  • ordinal data: Ordinal data are data that can be ranked, with no certain distance between the rankings, but at least one is higher or greater than the other.
      Samples:

    • Strongly Agree, Agree, Neutral, Disagree, Strongly Disagree
      Variable: Agreement with some statement
    • Below $20,000, $20,001 - $50,000, Above $50,000
      Variable: Family Income
    • High, Medium, Low
      Variable: Negative affect attached to testing

    • interval data: Interval data are data that you can count in actual numbers. The intervals are equal, so that the interval between 4 and 5 is the same as the interval between 19 and 20.

      Graduate Theory Class

      • communicative act: An act for which the ultimate aim is understanding of the argumentation that should lead to consensus and to solution of the problems being discussed. In other words the communicative act is not an attempt to convince someone to side with you, but to arrive collectively and rationally at the best solution. (Habermas)



Site Copyright: Jeanne Curran and Susan R. Takata and Individual Authors, September 2003.
"Fair use" encouraged.