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Francis Fukuyama

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California State University, Dominguez Hills
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Created: October 12, 2001
Latest Update: September 14, 2002

E-Mail Icon jeannecurran@habermas.org
takata@uwp.edu

Social Capital and Civil Society and Solidarity

Copyright: Jeanne Curran and Susan R. Takata and Individual Authors: October 2001.
"Fair use" encouraged.

  1. The End of History

    World: Voices Of The Millennium -- Fall Of Communism Marked The End Of History

    "American social scientist and philosopher Francis Fukuyama claims that the fall of communism marked "the end of history." Fukuyama argued this thesis ten years ago -- first in a magazine article and then in a remarkable book. He set off an international intellectual furor that hasn't subsided yet. Now, in a new book, he tells how and why he believes that liberal democracy will triumph -- not only over fascism and communism -- but also over its own internal weaknesses. This is the first of two articles examining Fukuyama's controversial and persuasive views.

    "Prague, 27 July 1999 (RFE/RL) -- When Francis Fukuyama declared the end of history, he wasn't using the word "history" in its common sense as "the chronicle of human events." He was using the term with the meaning that 19th Century German philosopher Georg Hegel gave it. To Hegel, history was a process by which mankind was evolving its political principles and ultimate form of government and economic organization."
    Radio Free Europe - Radio Liberty. Second two paragraphs fo the article.

    The End of History Link added March 3, 2002.

    " American social scientist and philosopher Francis Fukuyama claims that the fall of communism marked "the end of history." Fukuyama argued this thesis ten years ago -- first in a magazine article and then in a remarkable book. He set off an international intellectual furor that hasn't subsided yet. Now, in a new book, he tells how and why he believes that liberal democracy will triumph -- not only over fascism and communism -- but also over its own internal weaknesses. This is the first of two articles examining Fukuyama's controversial and persuasive views. Prague, 27 July 1999 (RFE/RL) -- When Francis Fukuyama declared the end of history, he wasn't using the word "history" in its common sense as "the chronicle of human events." He was using the term with the meaning that 19th Century German philosopher Georg Hegel gave it. To Hegel, history was a process by which mankind was evolving its political principles and ultimate form of government and economic organization.

  2. Social Capital
    I like Fukuyama's simple statement: "social capital is an instantiated informal norm that promotes cooperation between two or more individuals." "Instantiated" here might be best defined as giving a concrete example of . . . (instantiate) Find in What Is Social Capital? Internation Monetary Fund Conference. Link checked September 14, 2002.

    See also

    Fukuyama discusses role of social capitalBy Sean Formato. The Johns Hopkins News-Letter. Link checked September 14, 2002.

    Fukuyama suggests that we often confuse the actual relationship with derivative relationships. That is, that we confuse civil society with social capital. Civil society may be composed of relationships that are concrete examples of social capital, but civil society is not social capital in and of itself. (epiphenomenal)

    Fukuyama discusses role of social capital By Sean Formato. The Johns Hopkins News-Letter.
    "While Americans used to participate in groups such as AFL-CIO, the armed forces and local churches, Fukuyama claimed that the social mediums of today, such as support groups and Internet chat rooms, are not as cohesive as those of the past."
    In Fukuyama discusses . . ." Scroll about two inches downthe John Hopkins Newsletter file to find this quote. jeanne

  3. The Clash of Civilizations

    Notice “Social Capital,” in Lawrence Harrison and Samuel P. Huntington, eds., Culture Matters, Basic Books, 2000. Samuel P. Huntington author of The Clash of Civilizations is one of the editors of Culture Matters.

  4. Edward Said, The Clash of Ignorance.

    Edward Said's critique of Huntiongton's Clash of Civilizations.

  5. The Radius of Trust

    J.P. Morgan's Character Lesson on Trust

    "TIES THAT BIND. Scholars have been on a quest over the past decade to better understand and measure the interplay between social relationships and economic performance. The empirical evidence is suggestive rather than definitive. Volker Bornschier, a sociologist at the University of Zurich, looked at the economic performance of 24 rich countries and 9 newly industrialized nations from 1980 to 1998. "Bornschier found that high levels of trust and tolerance had a measurable impact on economic performance, along with several other variables, including technological capital. (You can read Bornschier's study, Trust and Tolerance-Enabling Social Capital Formation for Modern Economic Growth and Societal Change online. The World Bank also devotes a section of its Web site to social capital.) "How can trust be restored? It starts with the recognition that the economy is increasingly dominated by high-octane finance, from hedge-fund gunslingers to venture capitalists to global mutual-fund managers. At the same time, the people's capitalism, the widespread embrace of investing for retirement in the capital markets by the mass of American workers, is here to stay. What binds these two groups together is their need for better information and more corporate transparency to make sensible investing decisions. Openness or transparency is a practical policy for reestablishing trust in a market economy."
    Scroll about two-thirds of the way down the file to find this quote. jeanne



Discussion Topics:

  1. What does Fukuyama mean by the "End of History?"

  2. What is social capital?

    jeanne's comments:

    I like Fukuyama's simple statement: "social capital is an instantiated informal norm that promotes cooperation between two or more individuals." "Instantiated" here might be best defined as giving a concrete example of . . . (instantiate) Find in What Is Social Capital? Internation Monetary Fund Conference. Link checked September 14, 2002.

    See also

    Fukuyama discusses role of social capitalBy Sean Formato. The Johns Hopkins News-Letter. Link checked September 14, 2002.

    Fukuyama suggests that we often confuse the actual relationship with derivative relationships. That is, that we confuse civil society with social capital. Civil society may be composed of relationships that are concrete examples of social capital, but civil society is not social capital in and of itself. (epiphenomenal)

    • What does Fukuyama mean by the concept of the "radius of trust?"