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No One Would Do That; The Cost of Denial
My World on May 9, 2005

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jeanne's painting of the cultures brought close together by technology, commodification, and globalization.
Power of Colonization and Exploitation by Those Who Can

Backup of photo from NY Times on May 8, 2005.
Sriyantha Walpola for The New York Times

Some maids being trained in Kegalla, Sri Lanka,
will find brutal work conditions in the Middle East.

Backup of photo from NY Times on May 8, 2005.
Sriyantha Walpola for The New York Times

Thangarasa Jeyanthi, 20,
said she was beaten daily while working as a housemaid in Lebanon.
She returned with burn marks, cuts and bruises and was put in a government shelter.

California State University, Dominguez Hills
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Created: May 7, 2005
Latest Update: May 8, 2005

E-Mail Icon jeannecurran@habermas.org
takata@uwp.edu

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No One Would Do That; The Cost of Denial: My World on May 9, 2005

And those who can include those who benefit by the commodification and corporatization of the third world, which in turn exploits those who cannot.

Abu Ghraib couldn't happen; surely American soldiers would not do such things. Those wealthy enough to hire help immigrating to their country would certainly not hurt them. Denial is easy. Denial preserves my pride in my country. My country wouldn't do that. The people of my country wouldn't do that. Americans do that. Immigrants come in illegally to American and are mistreated and beaten and sexually abused by their employers, just as Amy Waldman's article assures us is happening in the Middle East. Some of our soldiers, just like the soldiers of other nations, have done that and will do it again. This is the price of denial, the price of running in the fast track to the point that we are too tired to accept the pain of awareness. If I don't know, it can't be my fault. Not. I read of injustices around the world everyday in both of my newspapers. The information is there. It is our responsibility to love the human race enough to hear the information and to keep the information alive in discourse around us. Refusing to be aware makes us complicit.

Unlike Botero, I chose not to picture the violence. I wanted to remember to be aware of the exploitation with an image that I could live with on my wall.

'Great Crime' at Abu Ghraib Enrages and Inspires an Artist By Juan Forero. Published: May 8, 2005. Backup.

Thumbnail of one of Botero's paintings in Abu Ghraib exhibit.
Diners Magazine
"A painting in a series by Fernando Botero shows prisoners at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. Mr. Botero said that as an admirer of the United States, he expected better of the American government."

Remembering and awareness do not mean that we will have the time in fast tracked lives to take up every cause, to speak out every time speaking out is needed. But it does mean that we remain open to hearing and seeing, that we not shut ourselves off in a comfortable local community that we proceed to take for the whole world itself. Increasingly, the real world is infringing on these local safe places we have reserved for our own privilege.

love and peace, jeanne

love and peace, jeanne



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