Link to What's New This Week Lecture Notes and Comments: Thursday, September 5, 2002.

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California State University, Dominguez Hills
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Soka University Japan - Transcend Art and Peace
Created: September 6, 2002
Latest Update: September 6, 2002

E-Mail Icon jeannecurran@habermas.org
takata@uwp.edu

Site Teaching Modules Lecture Notes and Comments: Monday, September 9, 2002.
These are raw notes as I recall them.

Site Copyright: Jeanne Curran and Susan R. Takata and Individual Authors, September 2002.
"Fair use" encouraged.

Our Discussions

Holy Toledo, kids! I just put up a model last week for how to give me a good simple definition in your own words as one measure of your learning: A good definition in your own words And now I have to tell you I was wrong. Not because it wasn't a good definition. Not because James just popped it off to me in the second week of classes; that was great! But because, as I was reviewing Social Justice, Criminal Justice, at p. 16, the last sentence, I recognized James' definition. Compare the sentences.

James' sentence:

"social justice is a type of justice that tells how people in society meet the needs of people and treat each subgroup equally"

Last sentence on p.16:

First, a society exhibits social justice when it (a) provides for the needs of the members of society and (b) when it treats its peoples in an equal manner."

James dutifully changed some of the words in the sentence, rephrasing it slightly. BUT he did not identify it as coming from Social Justice, Criminal Justice. Experts, i.e. professors, debate whether it is legitimate to make such minor changes and call it rephrasing. Many say no. Some say you must not follow the exact order of the thoughts as developed, which happened in this example. At the very least, the passage in our text should have been identified.

All of you, review Plagiarism and get these little subtleties straight. Such a mistake can cost you an F in a course or suspension from school. This is serious stuff. Please be informed and be careful. It's always safe to CYA with a citation to your source, giving the text and the page number. jeanne

And James, please send me a new definition that won't get you in trouble.