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Methods and Sampling

California State University, Dominguez Hills
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Latest update: May 22, 1999
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Some Problems with Captive Populations for Obtaining Samples
Calls to the Field (Informed Respondents)



Some Problems with Captive Populations for Obtaining Samples

Brief Summary by jeanne
May 22, 1999



Calls to the Field for Obtaining Samples

Brief Summary by jeanne
May 22, 1999

One procedure for obtaining samples that do not involve the coercion of a captive group (and the consequent uncertainties that entails for measurement) is that of using "informed respondents." Informed respondents are those who have some relationship to the research problem and who are consequently more likely to be informed on the related issues. If you are studying crime, corrections officers, police, social workers, teachers, juvenile justice workers are all likely to have had experience with crime in the course of their professional work. One way to get information is to issue a "Call to the Field." this can be done through a Web site, through local agencies, through local newsletters, through national newsletters, etc. Participation is voluntary in most cases, but such alternatives provide you with a forum: a place to announce that you need information and help in gathering it. Most professionals are glad to help in such endeavors. Increasingly the Web provides such a forum.

As an example, look at the National Criminal Justice Association "Call to the Field". You'll need to scroll down almost to the bottom of the page to find the call for help in gathering information on Assisting Victims of Campus Crime. Not only does the Web site offer you a forum from which to request help in gathering data. Its forms provide the means to do so.