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California State University, Dominguez Hills
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Created: June 17, 2004
Reviewed:
Latest Update: July 27, 2004

E-Mail Icon jeannecurran@habermas.org
takata@uwp.edu

Index of Topics on Site Project Suggestions for Shared Reading Sessions
This file is designed to aid you in selecting readings to discuss, as our classes will consist mostly of discussion. You will learn more if you refer to these templates before the discussion. And they provide examples for readings and topics that you choose on your own. Off the wall comments that indicate that you have done little or no reading on the topic are not a good way to show off your learning. For example, if our discussion is on "forgiveness," a comment such as "I think people should forgive each other." doesn't add much to what we call a "deep learning" discussion. But a comment on the problems presented by "easy forgiveness" and a a reference to Bonhoffer would add quite a lot to a "deep learning" discussion.

Don't forget that asking questions is a good way to contribute. Our discussions are a good place to clarify concepts, make sense of what wasn't clear in the lectures or in the texts. Again, if you ask lots of questions that indicate that you haven't prepared for the discussion, like "Who's was Bonhoffer?" that's not a good way of encouraging others to help you with your learning. Our work is collaborative by choice. People will help you. But not if you don't help yourself, at least a little.

Availability:

red check = Scheduled for presentation with one presenter.
red check red check = Has been scheduled by a second presenter. Good choice for beginners in the Naked Space project.
gold star = Includes template, and available to presenters.

Difficulty levels:

  • Full range, according to what you focus on in sharing
  • Beginning, could manage without special prerequisite learning
  • Intermediate, necessitates familiarity with several key concepts
  • Advanced, will require some grasp of advanced concepts

Manageable Topics:



Site Copyright: Jeanne Curran and Susan R. Takata and Individual Authors, June 2004.
"Fair use" encouraged.