Link to Sponsoring Departments Rewards as Harmful When Learning Is Transferred

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Rewards as Harmful

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California State University, Dominguez Hills
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Created: February 10, 2006
Latest Update: February 11, 2006

E-Mail Icon jeannecurran@habermas.org
takata@uwp.edu

Index of Topics on Site Rewards as Harmful
When Learning Is Transferred to Pleasure in Getting the Reward
from Pleasure in the Process of Learning

Festinger's cognitive dissonance theory would suggest that giving cars to kids for attending school is not gonna cut it. And for Perfect Attendance, Johnny Gets... a Car By Pam Belluck, New York Times, Sunday, February 5, 2006, p. A 1. Backup.

Compare this to Alfie Kohn's articles. Use his search mechanism and search for rewards. That ought to pick up several of his pieces. jeanne

References

  • Old Alfie Kohn index on Dear Habermas Check it out.

  • Advanced reference: Mindfulness and Interpersonal Communication By Judee K. Burgoon Journal of Social Issues, Spring 2000.

    "The noncommonsensical nature of Festingerís minimal justification hypothesis generated a great deal of hostility in social science circles. Theorists who interpreted all behavior as the result of incentives seemed affronted at the notion that rewards might hurt a cause rather than help it. The controversy stimulated a mass of studies from advocates and detractors of the surprising prediction. It all began with the famous $1/$20 experiment." From From the Third Edition of A First Look at Communication Theory by Em Griffin, ” 1997, McGraw-Hill, Inc. Link from



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