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California State University, Dominguez Hills
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Created: May 16, 2004
Latest Update: May 17, 2004

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takata@uwp.edu

Index of Topics on Site The Rhinoceros
Sometimes we wonder why it is so important to save esoteric species that are endangered with extinction. The rhinoceros provides a good example. Look at the joy and whimsy Niki de Saint Phalle finds in this strange and delightful animal. And share the curiosity and intrigue of Durer's sixteenth century drawing from descriptions he had heard of the animal. The National Gallery of Art includes a rhino in its choice of collage images. And today, Uganda struggles to save the rhinoceros from extinction so that our children's children will be able to share these wonders. We need to preserve the earth and its creatures for future generations.

  • Niki de Saint Phalle's Rhino

    The Herbert Palmer Gallery in Los Angeles prepared a small booklet of Niki de Saint Phalle's last images. In my desperate attempt to clean up my house after the furor that preceded our Naked Space Exhibit, I came across this little booklet, and was struck by the last of the images included, a lithogrpah, Rhino, 1999.

    Herbert Palmer Gallery:

    Niki de Saint Phalle's Rhino lithograph, 1999.
    Niki de Saint Phalle, Rhino, 1999
    Lithograph, Versailles Ed. 1/5, 12 x 18", 30.5 x 45.7 cm

    For more of Niki de Saint Phalle's work, go to her Niki de Saint Phalle's Official Site. But for now, I wanted to show you another Rhino, famous in art history:

  • Albrecht Durer's Rhino

    version from Rob's Travel Photos on Fortune City
    Albrecht Durer's Rhino
    "An old drawing by Durer from 1515 that looks like a cross between an Asian rhino and a Samurai warrior! I would guess that he never actually saw a real rhino."

    Albrecht Durer's Rhino . . . Backup:

    Princeton Art History class photo.

    "Without obtaining examples, the new alliance between humanist investigation of words and naturalistic illustration broke down. Here is a rhinoceros by Albrecht Durer which attempts to represent the animal from a description of its armor. Notice how it resembles a knight's armor." From a Princeton Art History Site.

  • The Rhino in the Collage Machine at the National Gallery of Art

    There's a rhino in the national gallery's collage maker, and we had two pieces in the Naked Space Exhibit from that.

    rhino made with Collage Machine at the National Gallery of Art
    jeanne's collage from the Collage Machine at the National Gallery of Art
    Can you find the rhino, the camel, the palm tree???

    collage of rhino picture above
    Don't forget you can collage your collage.

  • Save the Rhino

    Rhino Fund Uganda . . . .

    Logo from save the rhino site.
    Save the Rhino Site

    Introduction

    Rhino Fund Uganda, in collaboration with the governmental institutions responsible for wildlife, is establishing a sanctuary for the breeding of white and black rhinoceros. Apart from breeding, education of the public and children of Uganda is an important goal, necessary to help protect the rhino’s safe existence in future generations.

    An educational program will be run in the sanctuary’s visitor centre. The same program will be taken to schools in the area, to create awareness about the plight of the rhino in Uganda and the importance of rhino conservation, and to involve surrounding communities in the project.

    From the Save the Rhino Site

Rhinos on Cave Walls About an inch and a half down the file.

Eugéne Ionesco by Dagny Scott. Rhinoceros by Eugene Ionesco. Backup.


"But, Mommy, 'truth' is only an expression of the dominant paradigm!"
From Gods of Ramen Website

. . .

Banked Learning for the Liberal Arts

Names you should recognize:

  • Niki de Saint Phalle
  • Albrecht Durer
  • The National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.



Site Copyright: Jeanne Curran and Susan R. Takata and Individual Authors, May 2004.
"Fair use" encouraged.