Dear Habermas Logo and Backlink to Site Index A Jeanne Site

Reports of Learning, Sociology 595, Spring 1999
Criminal Justice and Social Change

California State University, Dominguez Hills
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Latest update: June 15, 1999
E-mail Faculty on the Site.



"Grades", by Last 4 Numbers of Student ID



These short statements of my perception of your learning are what grew from my review of all the records and our experiences in class. In a cooperative learning world, in which our objective is to help each other gain critical insights, what should matter, instead of "grades" is such a report. Learning that I can tell you I have seen, either directly or through some of your work, and that you can confiirm. That is learning accountability.

As we gain skill at this, a paragraph of recommendation should be your goal for the end of each course, each semester. If you were to realize that this is how I will end the course, and you were to want the best possible recommendation of your learning, we could interactively check our respective records all semester, and the recommendations could be detailed and helpful to all who want to know about your learning.

Visit Letters of Recommendation for clues on how to do this.

It was a pleasure teaching you. I hope that some of you will visit me, or e-mail me and begin to let me know how these recommendations could better reflect your learning. I apologize that there is no order to the numbers; that is because you were listed alphabetically on my roll sheet. jeanne


Much of this class was devoted to the understanding of the student's role in the creation and publication of process texts. The Dear Habermas site was started with testable hypotheses: (1) that students would participate in publication if it were accessible in manageable portions, and (2) that students wished to delve that deeply into the subject matter of the discipline. But Curran and Takata realized that they were moving from preconceptualized notions, albeit ones based on the long years of experimentation with moot court. This seminar became the testing ground for student input, which had begun to flow in the Fall of 1998, but which became considerably more defined throughout this semester. Thus the seminar consisted to a large extent in a grounded theory investigation of inviting students to jon in academic discourse. To that end, projects served as immediate data for understanding and seeking new avenues of investigation, and so are not all completed, as they might have been in an earlier semester. Students received credit for their understanding of the project as process texts began to develop.


1244


2274


6375


6947


8610


6188


2993


2793


8909


2069


6768


4041


0110


4470


1245


0660


2917


0225


4341


1403


1386


6633


7058


6157


0548


2751


5531


6205


4109


1866


1065


8833


9548


6503


7925


4313