Link to the UWP Birdie Calendar Susan Takata's Hub Page

Dear Habermas Logo and Link to Site Index A Justice Site



Susan Takata

Classes:
Criminology
Corrections
Race, Crime, Law
HOME


Main Hub Sites:
Habermas Site - CSUDH Site - UWP Site

Prof. Takata.
Department of Criminal Justice
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Latest Update: November 8, 2001

UWP Local Hub Site
Dear Habermas
  • This local hub site will serve as a forum for messages about:


    All UWP Classes, Announcements
    • November 12-26, 2001 -- Advising for Spring 2002
    • Wednesday, November 14 - Second Five Week Grid/ROL due. Put the ROL on the back side of the grid form and be sure to include a grade. Your ROL should be 25 words or less. Be realistic in your self-assessment. This ROL covers Weeks 5 through 10 (October 7 - November 10).
    • November 22-23, 2001 -- Thanksgiving Break
    • November 26, 2001 -- First Day of Spring 2002 Preregistration

    • Monday, December 10, 2001 -- Final Absolute Deadline
    • Friday, December 14, 2001 -- Last Day of Fall Semester Classes

    • Criminal Justice Association News

      Check the Criminal Justice Department web page for future club announcement. Next Meeting will be Thursday, November 8th from 12:15-12:45 pm in the Union Cafeteria.

    All UWP Classes, Fall 2001 Report of Learning (ROL)

    • Wednesday, November 14th - Second Five Week Grid/ROL due. Put the ROL on the back side of the grid form. ROL should be 25 words or less and with a grade included. Be realistic in your self-assessment. This ROL covers Weeks 5 through 10 (October 7 - November 10).

    • Keep in mind:

      ** the 5Cs: competency, consistency, cooperation, communication, and creativity.

      ** Bloom and Krathwohl's Taxonomy of Learning: latent learning, recognition, recall, application, analysis, evaluation, and synthesis.

    • Reports of Learning (ROL) must be interactive and interdependent. You are responsible for telling me what you have accomplished, verifying it with your journal, and then emailing me a brief ROL. A ROL must be interactive to be effective. By writing your own ROL and negotiating it with me, means that you must assume responsibility for your learning by giving me detailed evidence of your learning. Link to UWP Grade Form and for an explanation of the grade form link to Choosing Measures for Grading

    • Criminology Fall 2001 Report of Learning Page

    • Corrections Fall 2001 Report of Learning Page

    • Race, Crime & Law Fall 2001 Report of Learning Page


    All UWP Classes, web assigned readings:
    All UWP Classes, field trips

      The following field trip has been scheduled. If you are interested in attending, please email me. Priority is simply "first come, first serve." Do not be a "no show" ! (If you cannot attend, you will need to let me know ASAP so that others can attend).

      Racine Correctional Institution -- Saturday, November 10th, 10a.m. til 12 noon. Maximum: 25 students. Must be at least 18 years old. As of November 8th, this site visit is filled.

    Criminology (CRMJ/SOCA 233)



    • Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 10 a.m. central time on the date noted)

    • Wednesday, November 14th - Second Five Week Grid/ROL due. Put the ROL on the back side of the grid form. ROL should be 25 words or less and with a grade included. Be realistic in your self-assessment. This ROL covers Weeks 5 through 10 (October 7 - November 10).

      Target/Victim (due Friday, November 9th). Note: Incorporate in your answer the documentary, "Heart Broken in Half." 1) According to routine activities theory, what three elements are needed for a crime to occur? Provide an example to illustrate each element. 2) What is the major underlying assumption of the rational choice perspective? 3) Joel Best's article opens with "victimization has become fashionable." Why does he say this? 4) Which of the two theories -- rational choice or routine activities -- best explains "Heart Broken in Half"? Why. What are the implications for "theory, policy, practice"?

      Labeling Theory (due Wednesday, November 14th). Note: Incorporate in your answer, the documentary, "Thug Life in D.C.". 1) What is symbolic interactionism and how did this affect labeling theory? 2) Does criminal behavior have to occur for a person to be labeled "criminal"? Why. 3) What is the difference between primary and secondary deviation? 4) What does Pollock have to say about labeling theory? Do you agree with her critique? Why. 5) Compare and contrast social strain theory (Durkheim, Merton) with labeling theory (Becker, Lemert).

      NEW Marxist Criminology (due Wednesday, November 21st). 1) Across all the readings in Williams and McShane Conflict Theories section, what can you point to as elements that are in common? 2) What are the major similarities and differences between consensus theories and conflict theories. 3) How does the consumer behavior experiment relate to labeling theory and Marxism? Why.

    • NEW Special Announcement

      CRMJ/SOCA 233 Criminology students are welcome to join my other two classes on Friday, November 16, when guests from Ellsworth Correctional Center will be visiting. My Corrections course meets in Moln D101 from 11-11:50 a.m. and my Special Topics: Race, Crime, Law class meets in Moln 109 from 1-1:50 p.m.

    • Recommended Readings

      Howard Becker. Outsiders.

      Jeffery Reiman. The Rich Get Richer, and the Poor Get Prison.


    • Important Class Related Links

      NEW Sticks and Stones

      NEW Lemert's Theory of Secondary Deviance.

      Criminology - Index of Resources and Teaching Essays

      Preventing Crime


    Corrections (CRMJ/SOCA 363)

    • Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 11 a.m. central time on the date noted)

    • Wednesday, November 14 - Second Five Week Grid/ROL due. Put the ROL on the back side of the grid form. ROL should be 25 words or less and with a grade included. Be realistic in your self-assessment. This ROL covers Weeks 5 through 10 (October 7 - November 10).

      Holes - Middle (due Wednesday, November 14th). 1) Compare and contrast the formal structure and informal structure of Camp Green Lake in terms of survival. Also, in terms of "inmate-guard" relations. 2) What is the purpose of digging holes from a correctional perspective? Why. 3) What role does race relations play in this book, so far? How does this compare to Hassine's observations? Why.

      Special Populations (due Monday, November 19th). Note: Be sure to incorporate the documentary, "Voices from Inside" as well as the Ellsworth Correctional Center visitors into your answers. 1) What are some of the unique problems and challenges when dealing with the HIV-positive prisoner? the elderly prisoner? the female prisoner? Why. 2) As a follow-up, what might be some solutions relating to the problems of the HIV-positive prisoner? the elderly prisoner? the female prisoner? Why.

      NEW Holes-End/Juvenile Corrections (due Wednesday, November 28th). 1) After completing Holes, what does this book tell us about juvenile corrections? Why. 2) What is the future direction of juvenile corrections? Do you agree or disagree with this direction? Why.

    • Recommended Readings

      Kathleen O'Shea. Women on the Row: Revelations from Both Sides of the Bars.

      Sandy Cook & Susanne Davies. Harsh Punishment: International Experiences of Women's Imprisonment.

      Lori Girschick. No Safe Haven: Stories of Women in Prison.


    • Interesting Links

      NEW The Problem with Incarcerating Mothers.

      NEW Juvenile Corrections

      Juvenile Justice: Annotations on Holes.

      Maricopa County Sheriff's Office Jail Cam Link. Link found by Mary Frances Chachula.

      Wisconsin Department of Corrections

      Virtual Prison Tour

    • NEW Special Announcement

      On Friday, November 16th, we will have visitors from the Ellsworth Correctional Center as guests in our class.


    Race, Crime & Law (CRMJ/SOCA 490)

    • Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 1 p.m. central time on the date noted)

    • Wednesday, November 14, 2001 - Second Five Week Grid/ROL due. Put the ROL on the back side of the grid form. ROL should be 25 words or less and with a grade included. Be realistic in your self-assessment. This ROL covers Weeks 5 through 10 (October 7 - November 10).

      Color of Death (due Monday, November 19th). 1) From page 225 in Walker's Color of Justice: Echoing Justice Blackmun, they have argued that "the most profound expression of racial discrimination in sentencing occurs in the use of capital punishment." What is your response to this quote? Why. Based on the readings and other materials, do you agree or disagree with this statement? Why. 2) Consider the five remedies for racial discrimination in capital sentencing (See Box 8.5). What do you believe is the appropriate remedy? Why. What would Kennedy support? Why. (Question #5; Walker, p. 255). 3) In the Kennedy book on page 342, Kenneth Culp Davis states: "... The power to be lenient is the power to discriminate." Do you agree or disagree with this statement as it relates to race and the death penalty? Why.

      NEW Corrections and Race (due Monday, November 26th). 1) If the "War on Drugs" refers to a policy, what is the underlying theory, and ultimately, what goes on in practice? Why. 2) What policies can be created from the principles of restorative justice (based on indigenous justice principles)? Are these values more compatible with some types of offenses than others? More appropriate for some types of offenders than others? What would Fellman say? Why. [Question is from Walker, question 4 on page 282]. 3) How does one explain the "overrepresentation" of peoples of color in prisons from the point of view of theory, policy, and practice? What would Fellman and Kennedy say? Why.

    • Links to Lecture Notes and Other Things

      The Death Penalty: A Jury of Peers and Racism

      Race, Crime, Law class web board

      Giving Voice to Race for additional resources and links.

      Check out links to Gordon Fellman related materials on the Dear Habermas site.

    • NEW Special Announcement

      On Friday, November 16th, we will have visitors from the Ellsworth Correctional Center as guests in our class.

    Law & Social Change (CRMJ/SOCA 352) To Be Offered Spring 2002