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Susan Takata

Classes:
Criminology
Corrections
Race, Crime, Law
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Main Hub Sites:
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Prof. Takata.
Department of Criminal Justice
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Latest Update: November 20, 2001

UWP Local Hub Site
Dear Habermas
  • This local hub site will serve as a forum for messages about:


    All UWP Classes, Announcements
    • Monday, November 26, 2001 -- First Day of Spring 2002 Preregistration
    • NEW Wednesday, December 5th -- Final Exam.
    • Monday, December 10, 2001 -- FINAL ABSOLUTE DEADLINE -- All course assignments and materials, including the third rol/grid form, need to be submitted no later than the beginning of class time. No exceptions. SNOWSTORM OR NO SNOWSTORM!
    • Friday, December 14, 2001 -- Last Day of Fall Semester Classes

    • Criminal Justice Association News

      Check the Criminal Justice Department web page for future club announcement.

    All UWP Classes, Fall 2001 Report of Learning (ROL)

    All UWP Classes, web assigned readings: All UWP Classes, field trips:

      Site visits for Fall 2001 have been completed.

    Criminology (CRMJ/SOCA 233)
    • Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 10 a.m. central time on the date noted)

    • Monday, December 10, 2001 -- FINAL ABSOLUTE DEADLINE -- All course assignments and materials, including the third rol/grid form, need to be submitted no later than the beginning of class time. No exceptions. SNOWSTORM OR NO SNOWSTORM!

      Feminist Criminology (due Wednesday, November 28th). Note: Be sure to incorporate into your answers Klein, Adler and Pollock. 1) What do feminist approaches add to criminological theory? 2) Why do you think early theorists ignored female criminality? 3) Klein writes about the "legacy of sexism". What does she mean, and how important do you think this is for today's crime and delinquency theory? 4) How do you think the Women's Movement and the correspnding changes that were occurring in American society affected Adler's ideas on female crime as she wrote Sisters in Crime?

      NEW Violent & White Collar Crime (due Monday, December 3rd). Note: Incorporate in your answers, the documentary, "Crime in the Suites" to be shown in class. 1) Define white collar crime. 2) In Criminal Violence, Criminal Justice , Charles Silberman noted that violence is as American as apple pie. Do you agree or disagree with Silberman? Why. 3) Briefly compare and contrast how the strain theorist, labeling theorist and Marxist would explain the causes and solutions to violent crime. Which perspective do you agree with the most? Why.

      NEW Theory, Police, Practice Revisited (due Friday, December 7th). 1) Of all the criminological theories, criminal justice policies and practices, "what works?" Why. (Relate your answer to crime prevention. See link below). 2) As a follow up, what theory (or theories), policy (or policies), practice (or practices) best applies to the most successful crime prevention strategies or programs? Why.

    • NEW Final Exam Study Questions (scheduled for Wednesday, December 5th)

      1) Throughout the Pollock book, she has provided her review and critique of the various criminological theories. What is her conclusion as to the relationship between theory, policy, practice as it relates to criminal women? Why. Do you agree or disagree with Pollock's conclusion? Why.

      2) What is white collar crime? What is the major cause of white collar crime according to the strain theorist, labeling theorist and Marxist? Which theorist do you agree with? Why.

      3) Which theory best explains today's gang problem? What gang intervention/prevention policies (programs) would this theory propose? Why. And, how effective would such policies and programs be, in practice? Why.

      4) During the second half of this course, which theory most accurately explains today's crime and delinquency problems? Be sure to include in your answer the relationship of your selected theory to policy and practice.

    • Special Announcement

      Friday, December 14, 2001 -- Last Day of Fall Semester Classes

    • Recommended Readings
    • Important Class Related Links

      Criminology - Index of Resources and Teaching Essays

      Preventing Crime


    Corrections (CRMJ/SOCA 363)

    • Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 11 a.m. central time on the date noted)

    • Monday, December 10, 2001 -- FINAL ABSOLUTE DEADLINE -- All course assignments and materials, including the third rol/grid form, need to be submitted no later than the beginning of class time. No exceptions. SNOWSTORM OR NO SNOWSTORM!

      Holes-End/Juvenile Corrections (due Wednesday, November 28th). 1) After completing Holes, what does this book tell us about juvenile corrections? Why. 2) What is the future direction of juvenile corrections? Do you agree or disagree with this direction? Why.

      NEW Future of Corrections (due Friday, December 7th) 1) In comparing theory and policy (Haas & Alpert readings) with practice (Hassine and Sachar), what are the points of departure? Where do ideas merge? Why. 2) How do you think offenders will be punished/corrected in the future? Why. 3) In the future, what should be the dominant goal of criminal sanctions? Why. 4) What recommendations would you make with regard to the way career criminals are handled? Why. Provide examples from the readings.

    • NEW Final Exam Study Questions (scheduled for Wednesday, December 5th)

      1) Compare and contrast the correctional experience of Hassine in Life Without Parole with that of Stanley in Holes. What can we learn from both experiences as they relate to "theory, policy, and practice?" Why.

      2) Charles Logan notes: "We ask them to correct the incorrigible, rehabilitate the wretched, deter the determined, restrain the dangerous and punish the wicked." What does Logan mean? How does this compare to Hassine's assessment of corrections? And finally, how does this relate to "theory, policy, and practice?" Why.

      3) What is the most serious problem in corrections today? Why. How does this selected problem and its solution relate to "theory, policy and practice?" Why. Be sure to incorporate the readings into your essay.

      4) Compare and contrast jails and prisons. And then, compare and contrast probation and parole. Discuss one of these aspects of corrections as it relates to "theory, policy, practice."

    • Recommended Readings

      Kathleen O'Shea. Women on the Row: Revelations from Both Sides of the Bars.

    • Interesting Links

      Juvenile Corrections

      Juvenile Justice: Annotations on Holes.

      Maricopa County Sheriff's Office Jail Cam Link. Link found by Mary Frances Chachula.

      Wisconsin Department of Corrections

      Virtual Prison Tour

    • Special Announcement

      Friday, December 14, 2001 -- Last Day of Fall Semester Classes



    Race, Crime & Law (CRMJ/SOCA 490)

    • Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 1 p.m. central time on the date noted)

    • Monday, December 10, 2001 -- FINAL ABSOLUTE DEADLINE -- All course assignments and materials, including the third rol/grid form, need to be submitted no later than the beginning of class time. No exceptions. SNOWSTORM OR NO SNOWSTORM!

      Corrections and Race (due Monday, November 26th). 1) If the "War on Drugs" refers to a policy, what is the underlying theory, and ultimately, what goes on in practice? Why. 2) What policies can be created from the principles of restorative justice (based on indigenous justice principles)? Are these values more compatible with some types of offenses than others? More appropriate for some types of offenders than others? What would Fellman say? Why. [Question is from Walker, question 4 on page 282]. 3) How does one explain the "overrepresentation" of peoples of color in prisons from the point of view of theory, policy, and practice? What would Fellman and Kennedy say? Why.

      NEW The Future (due Friday, November 30th). 1) On page 286, Walker states: "There is no escaping the fact that race, crime, and justice are inextricably linked in the minds of most Americans." What does he mean by this statement? Compare and contrast how Fellman and Kennedy would respond to Walker's statement. Which author do you agree with the most? Why. 2) How do Fellman, Kennedy and Walker explain the future direction and prospects for race, crime, and law? Which author do you agree with? Why.

    • NEW Final Exam Study Questions (scheduled for Wednesday, December 5th)

      1) Focusing on race, crime, and the law, how would Fellman, Kennedy and Walker explain the interrelationship between "theory, policy, practice" ? Which author do you agree with the most? Why.

      2) On pages 134-135, Kennedy states: " At present, jails and prisons are among the most influential institutions of socialization in African-American communities. The extent to which authorities will allow these institutions to remain dangerous, destructive, lawless hells is the extent to which authorities strengthen the belief held by an appreciable number of black Americans that the 'white man's' system of criminal justice remains their enemy." What does Kennedy mean by this? How would Fellman and Walker respond to Kennedy's quote? Why. Which author's interpretation do you agree with? Why.

      3) Select one of the following racial and ethnic issues in the criminal justice system: police-citizen encounters, jury composition, sentencing, the death penalty or corrections. Discuss the major racial problems in this area of the criminal justice system. Explain how it relates the "theory, policy, practice." Why.

      4) Which -- Fellman, Kennedy or Walker -- best addresses the solutions to the race, crime, law problems and issues? Why.

    • Links to Lecture Notes and Other Things

      The Death Penalty: A Jury of Peers and Racism

      Race, Crime, Law class web board

      Check out links to Gordon Fellman related materials on the Dear Habermas site.

    • Special Announcement

      Friday, December 14, 2001 -- Last Day of Fall Semester Classes

    Law & Social Change (CRMJ/SOCA 352) To Be Offered Spring 2002