Link to What's New This Week Susan Takata's Hub Page

Dear Habermas Logo and Link to Site Index A Justice Site



Susan Takata

Classes:
Corrections
Race, Crime and Law
Law and Social Change
Previous Weeks- Spring 2003
HOME


Main Hub Sites:
Habermas Site - CSUDH Site - UWP Site

Prof. Takata.
Department of Criminal Justice
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Latest Update: February 9, 2003

UWP Local Hub Site
Dear Habermas


    Newsflash!





    "Education is very important. School, however, is another matter."
    unknown (quote found by Katy Hansen)

    "Lose your wealth and you've lost nothing. Lose your health and you've lost something.
    Lose your character and you've lost everything."
    Ben Lapadula (quote found by Ryan Fornal)



  • This local hub site will serve as a forum for messages about:


    All UWP Classes, Announcements

    • Wednesday, February 19th - First Grid Form/ROL due for Law and Social Change class.
    • Friday, February 21st - First Grid Form/ROL due for Corrections and Race, Crime & Law classes.
    • new Wednesday, March 5th - Exam 1
    • Friday, March 14th - Last Day to Drop Class

    • Criminal Justice Association News

      Check the Criminal Justice Department web page for future club announcement.

    All UWP Classes, Spring 2003 Report of Learning (ROL)



    Readings & Forms for All UWP Classes:
    All UWP Classes, site visits and field trips:

      new Racine County Citizens Criminal Justice Advisory Task Force meeting - Thursday, February 20th, 1:30-4 pm (Auditorium, Ives Grove Office Complex, 14200 Washington Avenue, Sturtevant) - email me if you are interested in attending.

      new Racine County Citizens Criminal Justice Advisory Task Force meeting - Thursday, March 6th, 1:30-4 pm (Auditorium, Ives Grove Office Complex, 14200 Washington Avenue, Sturtevant) - email me if you are interested in attending.



    Corrections (CRMJ/SOCA 363)

    • Course Syllabus

    • Class Discussion Questions

      • Who Goes to Prison? (due Wednesday, February 12th ) 1) Who goes to prison? Why. 2) Is the selection process discriminatory? Why or why not. 3) Who "belongs" in prison? Why.

      • Hassine part 1 (due Friday, February 14th) 1) What are your reactions (i.e., thoughts, impressions) of the first eight chapters of Life Without Parole? What surprised you the most? Why? 2) In terms of theory, policy, practice, what do Hassine's experiences and observations tell us about today's prison?

      • Hassine Interviews (due Monday, February 17th) 1) In Part 2 Interviews, what is the most pressing problem in today's prison? Why. 2) If the prison experiment has failed miserably, then why do we keep building more prisons? Relate your answer to "theory, policy, practice."

      • Prison Violence (due Wednesday, February 19th) 1) Some people believe that the history of corrections shows a continuous movement toward more humane treatment in prisons as society, in general, has progressed. What would Hassine say? Why. What is your view? Why. 2) Compare and contrast Hassine's book with the Haas and Alpert readings on prison violence. Which came first -- the violent person creating the violent prison or prisons as a violent environment creating the violent person (or creating a more violent person)? Why.

      • new

    • Special Announcement

      --- Friday, February 21st - First Grid Form/ROL due.

      --- new Wednesday, March 5th - Exam 1

      --- Friday, March 14th - Last Day to Drop Class

    • Exam 1 Study Questions

      For those opting to take Exam 1, your essay will be written on a Guided Essay Form . The exam was scheduled for Wednesday, March 5th. [Note: Study questions to be up next week]

      1.

    • Recommended Readings

      --- Alfie Kohn. Beyond Discipline.
      --- James Austin & John Irwin. It's About Time: America's Imprisonment Binge
      --- Georg Rusche and Otto Kirchheimer. Punishment and Social Structure.
      --- Michel Foucault. Discipline and Punish.
      --- David Rothman. Discovery of the Asylum.

    • Interesting Links

      Maricopa County Sheriff's Office Jail Cam Link. Link found by Mary Frances Chachula.
      Wisconsin Department of Corrections
      Virtual Prison Tour



    Race, Crime and Law (CRMJ/SOCA 365)

    • Course Syllabus

    • Class Discussion Questions

      What is race? (due Friday, February 14th) 1) Summarize the arguments between the biologic/genetic vs. the socio-political concept of race. Which perspective do you agree with the most? Why. 2) Does race matter? Why or why not. 3) The descriptive information in UCR arrest data depicts an overrepresentation of African American offenders for most violent and property crimes. What are the possible explanations for such disparity? [question from page 55 in The Color of Justice].

      Fellman, pt. 3 (due Wednesday, February 19th) 1) What are "adversary rituals of coercion"? Provide at least three different examples of adversary rituals of coercion. 2) Given current events, what does Fellman tell us about the future of war? Do you agree or disagree with Fellman? Why. 3) What does Rambo symbolize according to Fellman? Who is the Rambo of today? Why.

      new

    • Special Announcements

      --- new Creative Measure Idea - Participate in the Hout Study on Backstage Race/Ethnic Relations Journal - see me for more details.

      --- Friday, February 21st - First Grid Form/ROL due

      --- new Wednesday, March 5th - Exam 1 --- Friday, March 14th - Last Day to Drop Class

    • Exam 1 Study Questions

      For those opting to take Exam 1, your essay will be written on a Guided Essay Form . The exam will be on Wednesday, March 5th . [note: study questions to be up next week]

      1.

    • Links to Lecture Notes and Other Things

      Gordon Fellman related materials on the Dear Habermas site.

      "Who's Habermas? Why Habermas?"

      Continuation of Bell Curve Genetic Arguments

      new War with Iraq

    • Recommended Readings

      --- Richard Goldsby. Race and Races.
      --- Paul Ehrlich. The Race Bomb.
      --- Cornel West. Race Matters.
      --- Robert Blauner. Still the Big News: Racial Oppression in America.
      --- William Julius Wilson. The Declining Significance of Race.

      --- Jurgen Habermas. Between Facts and Norms.
      --- Martha Minow. Making All the Difference: Exclusion, Inclusion and American Law. Check out this link Martha Minow on the Dear Habermas site.


    • Links to the Sociology of Law Handbook readings
      -- Introduction
      -- Chapter 1, part 1
      -- Chapter 1, part 2
      -- Chapter 2

    Law and Social Change (CRMJ/SOCA 352)

    • Course Syllabus

    • Class Discussion Questions

      Marxist Criminology/Socialist Feminism (due Wednesday, February 12th) 1) According to Marxist criminologists, what is social justice? Is there a connection between criminal justice and social justice? (from Arrigo, p. 27, Q.1). 2) Imagine some of the things you have witnessed in your life that violate your sense of social justice. Discuss these with your classmates in an open forum. (from Arrigo, p. 28, Q.9). 3) How do socialist feminists explain the criminality of women? (from Arrigo, p. 47, Q.4). 4) What insights about social justice does a socialist feminist perspective offer? (Arrigo, p. 47, Q.6).

      American Indians and Critical Race Theory (due Wednesday, February 19th) 1) Think about your own view of what you have been taught about Indians. Did this reading prompt you to consider any views you have held about Indians? If so, how? (M&Z, p. 27, Q.2). 2) What are some factors that led to a change in attitude toward Indians? Was the change lasting or substantial? Explain. (M&Z, p. 27, Q.5). 3) How were stereotypes incorporated inot the media's coverage of law suits and legislation? (M&Z, p. 70, Q.3) . 4) Briefly list the strengths and weaknesses of critical race theory as they relate to this week's readings on American Indians? 5) Select one issue in criminal justice dealing with the American Indian and state how critical race analysis would be useful. Why?

      new

    • Special Announcement

      --- new Creative Measure Idea - Participate in the Hout Study on Backstage Race/Ethnic Relations Journal - see me for more details.

      --- Wednesday, February 19th - First Grid Form/ROL due .

      --- new Wednesday, March 5th - Exam 1

      --- March 14th -- Last Day to Drop Class

    • Exam 1 Study Questions

      For those opting to take Exam 1, your essay will be written on a Guided Essay Form . The exam is scheduled for Wednesday, March 5th. [note: study questions will be up next week]

      1.


    • Recommended Reading

      --- Leonard Peltier. Prison Writings.
      --- Dee Brown. Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee.
      --- Mary Crow Dog. Lakota Woman.
      --- Nancy Lurie. Mountain Wolf Woman.

      --- Jurgen Habermas. Between Facts and Norms.
      --- Martha Minow. Making All the Difference: Exclusion, Inclusion and American Law. Check out this link Martha Minow on the Dear Habermas site.

    • Links to the Sociology of Law Handbook readings

      -- Introduction
      -- Chapter 1, part 1
      -- Chapter 1, part 2
      -- Chapter 2


    • Important Class Related Links

      "Who's Habermas? Why Habermas?"

      "They Ain't Us: Identity as an Anti-Norm"

      W.I. Thomas "Definition of the Situation

      Critical Race Theory


    Past Weekly Hubpages - Spring 2003


    Past Lecture Commentaries - Spring 2003


    All UWP Classes, Fall 2002 Report of Learning (ROL)