Link to What's New This Week Susan Takata's Hub Page

Dear Habermas Logo and Link to Site Index A Justice Site



Susan Takata

Classes:
Corrections
Race, Crime and Law
Law and Social Change
Previous Weeks- Spring 2003
HOME


Main Hub Sites:
Habermas Site - CSUDH Site - UWP Site

Prof. Takata.
Department of Criminal Justice
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Latest Update: March 2, 2003

UWP Local Hub Site
Dear Habermas


    Newsflash!

    Exam 1 (optional) is scheduled for Wednesday, March 5th - for all classes


    "War is not the answer, for only love can conquer hate."
    Marvin Gaye (quote found by Jennifer Harris)

    "Justice cannot be for one side, but must be for both."
    Eleanor Roosevelt (quote found by susan )

    "The importance of morality is that people behave themselves even if nobody is watching. There are not enough cops and laws to replace personal morality as a means to produce a civilized society. Indeed, the police and criminal justice system are the last desperate line of defense for a civilized society."
    Dr. Walt Williams(quote found by Wayne Berry)

    "Our greatest glory is not in never failing, but in rising up every time we fail.."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (quote found by Tony Ciardo)




  • This local hub site will serve as a forum for messages about:


    All UWP Classes, Announcements

    • Wednesday, March 5th - Exam 1
    • Friday, March 14th - Last Day to Drop Class
    • Friday, March 28th, 12 noon - 2nd Grid Form/ROL due

    • Criminal Justice Association News

      Check the Criminal Justice Department web page for future club announcement.

    All UWP Classes, Spring 2003 Report of Learning (ROL)



    Readings & Forms for All UWP Classes:
    All UWP Classes, site visits and field trips:

      Racine County Citizens Criminal Justice Advisory Task Force meeting - Thursday, March 6th, 1:30-4:30 pm (Auditorium, Ives Grove Office Complex, 14200 Washington Avenue, Sturtevant) - email me if you are interested in attending.

      new Racine County Citizens Criminal Justice Advisory Task Force meeting - Thursday, March 27th, 1:30-4:30 pm (Auditorium, Ives Grove Office Complex, 14200 Washington Avenue, Sturtevant) - email me if you are interested in attending.



    Corrections (CRMJ/SOCA 363)

    • Course Syllabus

    • Class Discussion Questions

      • Courts & Corrections (due Monday, March 3) Note: Relate your answers to the documentary, "Hard Time" to be shown in class. . 1) How have offender rights been developed by the courts? What is the interrelationship between "theory, policy, practice" when it comes to courts and corrections? 2) Do prisoners give up their rights and privileges as punishment for crime(s) committed? How do we balance between the protection of the prisoner's rights and the community's need to punish? 3) What did you like best about Life without Parole ? What did you like least about this book? Why. 4) How does Hassine's conclusion relate to "courts and corrections?" Do you agree with his conclusion? Why.

      • new The Rehabilitation Debate (due Monday, March 10th). Note: Related your answers to the documentary, "Prison Gangs and Racism" to be shown in class. 1) Who is the typical inmate in supermax prisons? 2) Why does the supermax prison provide the best metaphor for moral bankruptcy when it comes to crime and corrections? 3) Based on the readings and other materials, does rehabilitation work? Why. 4) What are the arguments on both sides of the rehabilitation debate? Which side do you take? Why?

    • Special Announcement

      --- Wednesday, March 5th - Exam 1
      --- Friday, March 14th - Last Day to Drop Class
      --- Friday, March 28th, 12 noon - 2nd Grid/ROL due

    • Exam 1 Study Questions

      For those opting to take Exam 1, your essay will be written on a Guided Essay Form . The exam will be on Wednesday, March 5th.

      1. (As promised) in examining the "History of Corrections in America" handout, what would the correctional model that best depicts the period from the 1990s to date? Why. Incorporate examples from the readings into your argument.

      2. The four goals of criminal sanctions are retribution, deterrence, incapacitation and rehabilitation. Discuss each of these goals. Which goal is the most dominant today? Why. Provide examples from the readings and other class materials.

      3. Based on the readings and other class materials, compare and contrast"who goes to prison" with "who belongs in prison." What does this tell us about the interrelationship between "theory, policy, practice?" Why.

      4. How does "doing time" as explained in the Haas & Alpert book compare with the experiences of Hassine? Why. Relate this to "theory, policy, practice?" Why. Be sure to provide examples from both books.

      5. Based on Life Without Parole , do you think "the punishment fit the crime" for Hassine? Relate your answer to the interrelationshp between "theory, policy, practice?" Why.



    • Recommended Readings

      --- Donald Clemmer. The Prison Community The Society of Captives
      --- Leo Carroll. Hacks, Blacks and Cons.
      --- John Irwin. Prisons in Turmoil.
      --- L. Goodstein & D.L. MacKenzie The American Prison: Issues in research and policy .
      --- American Friends Service Committee. Struggle for Justice.
      --- David Fogel. . . . We Are Living Proof . . .
      --- Graeme Newman. The Punishment Response.
      --- James Q. Wilson. Thinking about Crime.
      --- Elliott Currie. Confronting Crime.

      --- Jeffrey Reiman. The Rich Get Richer and the Poor Get Prison.
      --- James Austin & John Irwin. It's About Time: America's Imprisonment Binge.


    • Interesting Links

      Death Penalty Index

      Maricopa County Sheriff's Office Jail Cam Link. Link found by Mary Frances Chachula.
      Wisconsin Department of Corrections
      Virtual Prison Tour



    Race, Crime and Law (CRMJ/SOCA 365)

    • Course Syllabus

    • Class Discussion Questions

      Justice on the Streets? (due Friday, March 7th) 1) What is meant by a contextual approach to examining policing, race and ethnicity? 2) How is policing in Native American communities different than policing in the rest of the United States? 3) When does the police use of deadly force become "excessive" or "unjustified"? Give a definition of excessive force. 4) Define the concept of affirmative action. Do you support or oppose affirmative action in the employment of police officers? Do you think affirmative action is more important in policing than in other areas of life? Explain.

      new Justice on the Bench? (due Friday, March 14th). 1) In Chapter 5, "Race and the Composition of Juries: Setting the Ground Rules," what are the three main issues discussed by Kennedy? 2) . . . Some have suggested that the names of majority race jurors be removed from the jury list (thus ensuring a larger proportion of racial minorities); others have suggested that a certain number of seats on each jury be set aside for racial minorities. How would you justify these reforms to a state legislature? How would an opponent of these reforms respond? Overall, are these good ideas or bad ideas? Why. [the complete question can be found in Walker, page 176].

    • Special Announcements

      --- Monday, March 3rd, 2-3:15pm - "The End of a Nightstick: Confronting Police Brutality in Chicago" to be shown in my Law and Social Change class (in Moln D139).
      --- Wednesday, March 5th - Exam 1
      --- new Friday, March 7th, 10-10:50 a.m. - "Prison Gangs and Racism" to be shown in my Corrections class (in Moln 222).
      --- Friday, March 14th - Last Day to Drop Class
      --- Friday, March 28th, 12 noon - 2nd Grid/ROL due
      --- Creative Measure Idea - Participate in the Hout Study on Backstage Race/Ethnic Relations Journal - see me for more details.



    • Exam 1 Study Questions

      For those opting to take Exam 1, your essay will be written on a Guided Essay Form . The exam will be on Wednesday, March 5th .

      1. In the early chapters of Randall Kennedy's Race, Crime and the Law , why does he note that unequal protection and unequal enforcement are major concerns? How would Fellman and Walker respond to Kennedy's observation? Why.

      2. "When I despair, I remember that all through history, the way of truth and love has always won. There have been murderers and tyrants, and for a time they can seem invincible. But in the end they always fall. Think of it, always." -- Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (1869-1948). What would the reactions of Fellman and Kennedy be to Gandhi's quote? Why. Provide examples from the readings.

      3. On page 227 in Fellman, why did he include this quote from Thompson, "... We do not live in reality; we live in our paradigms, our habituated perceptions, our illusions; the illusions we share through culture we call reality, but the true historical reality of our condition is invisible to us..." Explain this quote in terms of the concept of race. Provide examples from the readings to illustrae your point.

      4. On page 23 in Fellman, he quotes the Buddha: "Victory creates hatred, defeat creates suffering. Those who are wise strive for neither victory or defeat." Relate Fellman's concepts of adversarialism and mutuality to "race, crime, and law". Include in your discussion Walker and Kennedy.

      5. According to the readings so far this semester, what is the relationship between globalism and race and ethnic relations here in the United States? Why.



    • Links to Lecture Notes and Other Things

      Death Penalty Index

      Gordon Fellman related materials on the Dear Habermas site.

    • Recommended Readings

      --- Jerome Skolnick. Justice Without Trial.
      --- Katheryn Russell. The Color of Crime.
      --- Kenneth Meeks. Driving While Black.
      --- Harriet Ziskin. The Blind Eagle.
      --- William Wilbanks The Myth of a Racist Criminal Justice System.
      --- Jerome Miller. Search and Destroy: African American Males in the Criminal Justice System.

      --- Jurgen Habermas. Between Facts and Norms.
      --- Martha Minow. Making All the Difference: Exclusion, Inclusion and American Law. Check out this link Martha Minow on the Dear Habermas site.


    • Links to the Sociology of Law Handbook readings
      -- Introduction
      -- Chapter 1, part 1
      -- Chapter 1, part 2
      -- Chapter 2

    Law and Social Change (CRMJ/SOCA 352)

    • Course Syllabus

    • Class Discussion Questions

    • new Prophetic Criticism and African Americans (due Monday, March 10th). 1) What is prophetic criticism? (Arrigo, p. 89, Q.1). 2) What role do individuals assume in creating and sustaining prophetic justice? (Arrigo, p. 89, Q.7). 3) In the previous edition, Mann & Zatz state: "... It is striking that all of the authors in this section share a common ideological thread: the unwarranted stigmatization of African Americans, especially African American males, through the use of assumptions about urban violence (although a majority of the inner-city African Americans are nonviolent) and drug involvement (although the majority of African Americans do not use drugs)," (p. 74). Why do these "unwarranted stigmatizations" persist? 4) Based on Chapters 3 & 8 in Mann & Zatz, what is the solution to alleviating racist stereotyping? Why.

    • new Anarchist Criminology and African Americans, pt. 2 (due Wednesday, March 12th ) Note: You will need to view "The End of the Nightstick," to be shown on March 3rd in order to answer these questions. 1) Identify and explain at least two police practices that are directed specifically at the African American community. 2) Relate "The End of the Nightstick" to anarchist criminology. Provide examples to better illustrate your point. 3) Anarchist justice incorporates the notion that we should protect and promote diversity and difference among people - that "anything goes". Within the model of anarchist justice, though, where are the limits to his notion that "anything goes?" Where would you set the limits? Why. (Arrigo, p. 106, Q. 4)



    • Special Announcement
      --- Wednesday, March 5th - Exam 1
      --- Friday, March 14th -- Last Day to Drop Class
      --- Friday, March 28th, 12 noon - 2nd Grid/ROL due

      --- Creative Measure Idea - Participate in the Hout Study on Backstage Race/Ethnic Relations Journal - see me for more details.



    • Exam 1 Study Questions

      For those opting to take Exam 1, your essay will be written on a Guided Essay Form . The exam is scheduled for Wednesday, March 5th.

      --- 1. Of all the theories covered so far -- Marxist criminology, socialist feminism, critical race theory or peacemaking criminology -- which theory makes the most sense in terms of "law and social change"? Relate your response to "theory, policy, practice." Why. Be sure to provide examples from the readings and other class materials.
      --- 2. According to Arrigo, what is the relationship between social justice and criminal justice? In your evaluation of this relationship, which theory -- Marxist criminology, socialist feminism, critical race theory or peacemaking criminology -- do you agree with the most? Why.
      -- 3. What do Mann and Zatz mean when they say that race is a "social construction"? Do you agree or disagree with Mann and Zatz? Why. Finally, how does this relate to the "tension" between facts and norms, according to Habermas? Provide examples from the readings and other materials in order to strengthen your argument.
      -- 4. Of all the theories covered so far -- Marxist criminology, socialist feminism, critical race theory or peacemaking criminology, which theory is most applicable to the American Indian experience? Why. Be sure to provide examples from the readings and other class materials.
      -- 5. Applying Habermas' notion of the "tension between facts and norms," what might be some examples from the American Indian past, present and future? Why. In your opinion, what is the most pressing "tension" and what are some possible remedies? Why.



    • Recommended Reading

      --- Derrick Bell. Faces at the Bottom of the Well.
      --- Derrick Bell. Race, Racism and American Law.
      --- Randall Kennedy. Race, Crime and the Law .
      --- Marc Mauer. Race to Incarcerate
      --- David Cole. No Equal Justice: Race and Class in the American Justice System.
      --- Jerome Miller. Search and Destroy: African-American Males in the Criminal Justice System.
      --- The Autobiography of Malcolm X.
      --- Robert Blauner. Still the Big New: Racial Oppression in America.

      --- Jurgen Habermas. Between Facts and Norms.
      --- Martha Minow. Making All the Difference: Exclusion, Inclusion and American Law. Check out this link Martha Minow on the Dear Habermas site.

    • Links to the Sociology of Law Handbook readings

      -- Introduction
      -- Chapter 1, part 1
      -- Chapter 1, part 2
      -- Chapter 2


    • Important Class Related Links

      Death Penalty Index

      W.I. Thomas "Definition of the Situation


    Past Weekly Hubpages - Spring 2003


    Past Lecture Commentaries - Spring 2003


    All UWP Classes, Fall 2002 Report of Learning (ROL)