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Susan Takata

Classes:
Corrections
Race, Crime and Law
Law and Social Change
Previous Weeks- Spring 2003
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Prof. Takata.
Department of Criminal Justice
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Latest Update: March 30, 2003

UWP Local Hub Site
Dear Habermas


    Newsflash!

    Exam 2 will be on Wednesday, April 23rd. Study questions have been posted.


    "For myself, I am an optimist -- it does not seem to be much use being anything else."
    Sir Winston Churchill (quote found by susan)

    "We must be the change in the world that we hope to see."
    Gandhi (quote found by Lisa Smith)

    "In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends ."
    Martin Luther King, Jr. (quote found by Amanda Boyd)

    "If I have seen further than others, it is because I have stood on the shoulders of giants."
    Sir Isaac Newton (quote found by Ryan Fornal)

    "War never decided who was right, only who was left."
    anonymous (quote found by Ryan Fornal)



  • This local hub site will serve as a forum for messages about:


    All UWP Classes, Announcements

    • new Wednesday, April 23rd - Exam 2
    • new Friday, May 2nd, 12 noon central time -- 3rd rol due and THE FINAL ABSOLUTE DEADLINE

    • Criminal Justice Association News

      Check the Criminal Justice Department web page for future club announcement.

    All UWP Classes, Spring 2003 Report of Learning (ROL)



    Readings & Forms for All UWP Classes:
    All UWP Classes, site visits and field trips:

      Racine County Citizens Criminal Justice Advisory Task Force meeting - Thursday, April 3rd, 1-4 pm new time! (Auditorium, Ives Grove Office Complex, 14200 Washington Avenue, Sturtevant) - email me if you are interested in attending.

      new Ellsworth Correctional Center - Tuesday, April 8th, 8:30 a.m. Maximum: 25 students. FILLED

      Racine County Citizens Criminal Justice Advisory Task Force meeting - Thursday, April 10th, 1-4 pm new time! (Auditorium, Ives Grove Office Complex, 14200 Washington Avenue, Sturtevant) - email me if you are interested in attending.

      Racine Correctional Institution Site Visit - Thursday, April 17th, 8:30-11:30 a.m. Maximum 20 students. FILLED

      Racine County Citizens Criminal Justice Advisory Task Force meeting - Thursday, April 17th, 1-4 pm new time! (Auditorium, Ives Grove Office Complex, 14200 Washington Avenue, Sturtevant) - email me if you are interested in attending.

      new Racine Youthful Offender Correctional Facility - Tuesday, April 22nd, 8:30 a.m. Maximum: 25 students. Must be at least 18 years old. FILLED



    Corrections (CRMJ/SOCA 363)

    • Course Syllabus

    • Class Discussion Questions

      • Community Corrections (due Monday, March 31st). 1) What are the differences and similarities between probation and parole? 2) What is the purpose of probation? What is the purpose of parole? 3) How does the use of probation effect the correctional system? Why is it used so extensively? 4) How could the investigative and supervisory function of probation be most effectively organized? Given these two organizational tasks, how should a probation officer parcel his/her time and effort? Why. 5) Based on the readings and other class materials, how would you explain parole in terms of "theory, policy, practice?" Why.

      • new Holes-Beginning (due Friday, April 4th). 1) How does the "institutionalization" of Stanley compare to that of Hassine's experience? Why. 2) What are your early impressions of Holes? Why.

    • Special Announcements
      -- Wednesday, April 23rd - Exam 2.
      -- Friday, May 2nd - 3rd grid form due and the ABSOLUTE FINAL DEADLINE


    • Exam 2 Study Questions

      For those opting to take Exam 2, your essay will be written on a Guided Essay Form . Exam 2 is scheduled for Wednesday, April 23rd.

      1. Compare and contrast jails and prisons. And then, compare and contrast probation and parole. Discuss one of these aspects of corrections as it relates to "theory, policy, practice."

      2. Compare and contrast the correctional experience of Hassine in Life Without Parole with that of Stanley in Holes . What can we learn from both experiences as they relate to "theory, policy, practice?" Why.

      3. What is the most serious problem in corrections today? Why. How does this selected problem and its solutions relate to "theory, policy, and practice?" Why. Be sure to incorporate the readings into your essy.

      4. Charles Logan notes: "We ask them to correct the incorrigible, rehabilitate the wretched, deter the determined, restrain the dangerous and punish the wicked." What does Logan mean? How does this compare to Hassine's assessment of corrections? And, finally, how does this relate to "theory, policy and practice?" Why.

      5. Based on the readings and other materials introduced in this course, what is the future of correctional "theories, policies and practices?" Why.

    • Recommended Readings

      --- H. Abadinsky. Probation and Parole: Theory and practice.
      --- J. Augustus. John Augustus: First Probation Officer.
      --- D. J. Champion. Probation and Parole in the United States .
      --- Peggy Burke. Abolishing Parole.
      --- Richard McCleary. Dangerous Men: The Sociology of Parole.
      --- Jonathon Simon. Poor Discipline: Parole and the Social Control of the Underclass, 1890-1990.


      --- Jeffrey Reiman. The Rich Get Richer and the Poor Get Prison.
      --- James Austin & John Irwin. It's About Time: America's Imprisonment Binge.


    • Interesting Links

      Maricopa County Sheriff's Office Jail Cam Link. Link found by Mary Frances Chachula.
      Wisconsin Department of Corrections
      Virtual Prison Tour



    Race, Crime and Law (CRMJ/SOCA 365)

    • Course Syllabus

    • Class Discussion Questions

      Race and Sentencing (due Wednesday, April 2nd). 1) How would you answer the question, "When does race make a difference in sentencing?" Why. How would Randall Kennedy answer this question? Why. What would Fellman say? Why. 2) Some researchers argue that racial stereotypes affect the ways in which decision makers, including criminal justice officials, evaluate the behavior of minorities. What are the stereotypes associated with African Americans? Latinos/as? American Indians? Asian Americans? How might these stereotypes affect judges' sentencing decisions? What would Fellman say? Why. 3) What type of sentencing reforms could be implemented to eliminate racial disparities? What does Randall Kennedy advocate when it comes to this issue? Why. What might Fellman advocate and why?

      new The Color of Death (due Friday, April 11th). Note: Incorporate the documentary, "Witness to Execution" into your answers. 1) From page 225 in Walker's The Color of Justice: Echoing Justice Blackmun, they have argued that "the most profound expression of racial discrimination in sentencing occurs in the use of capital punishment." What is your response to this quote? Why. Based on the readings and other materials, do you agree or disagree with this statement? Why. What would Kennedy and Fellman's reactions be? Why. 2) Consider the five remedies for racial discrimination in capital sentencing (see Box 8.5). What do you believe is the appropriate remedy? Why. What would Kennedy support? Why. What would Fellman support? Why. (Question 5; Walker, p. 255). 3) In the Kennedy book on page 342, Kenneth Culp Davis states: "... The power to be lenient is the power to discriminate." Do you agree or disagree with this statement as it relates to race and the death penalty? Why. What would Kennedy and Fellman say about this? Why? 4) What would Fellman and Kennedy's reactions be to the documentary, "Witness to Execution?" Why.



  • Special Announcements
    --- new Wednesday, April 23rd - Exam 2
    --- new Friday, May 2nd - 3rd rol due and THE ABSOLUTE FINAL DEADLINE


  • Exam 2 Study Questions

    For those opting to take Exam 2, your essay will be written on a Guided Essay Form . Exam 2 is scheduled for Wednesday, April 23rd.

    1. Focusing on race, crime and the law, how would Fellman, Kennedy and Walker explain the interrelationship between "theory, policy, and practice?" Why. Which author do you agree with the most? Why.

    2. Select one of the following racial and ethnic issues in the criminal justice system: police-citizen encounters, jury composition, sentencing, the death penalty or corrections. Discuss the major racial problems in this area of the criminal justice system. Explain how it relates to "theory, policy, and practice." Why. Be sure to incorporate the readings into your essay.

    3. On pages 134-135, Kennedy states: "At present, jails and prisons are among the most influential institutions of socialization in African-American communities. The extent to which authorities will allow these institutions to remain dangerous, destructive, lawless hells is the extent to which authorities strengthen the belief held by an appreciable number of black Americans that the 'white man's' system of criminal justice remains their enemy." What does Kennedy mean by this? How would Fellman and Walker respond to Kennedy's quote? Why. Which author's interpretation do you agree with? Why.

    4. What solutions do Fellman, Kennedy, or Walker offer to the "race, crime, law" problems? Why. Which author do you agree with the most? Why?



  • Links to Lecture Notes and Other Things

    The Death Penalty: A Jury of Peers and Racism

    Gordon Fellman related materials on the Dear Habermas site.

  • Recommended Readings

    --- Marc Mauer. Race to Incarcerate
    --- David Cole. No Equal Justice: Race and Class in the American Criminal Justice System.
    --- Jerome Miller. Search and Destroy: African American Males in the Criminal Justice System.

    --- Jurgen Habermas. Between Facts and Norms.
    --- Martha Minow. Making All the Difference: Exclusion, Inclusion and American Law. Check out this link Martha Minow on the Dear Habermas site.


  • Links to the Sociology of Law Handbook readings
    -- Introduction
    -- Chapter 1, part 1
    -- Chapter 1, part 2
    -- Chapter 2
    Law and Social Change (CRMJ/SOCA 352)

    • Course Syllabus

    • Class Discussion Questions

    • Constitutive Criminology/Latinos & Latinas, pt. 2 (due Wednesday, April 2nd) Note: In order to be prepared for this discussion, you must view the documentary, "hablas ingles?" Be sure to incorporate "hablas ingles?" in your answers to the following questions: 1) Why is it important to understand socially constructed differences when considering social justice in a postmodern society? Provide examples of how these differences build toward inequalities. (from Arrigo, p. 173, Q. 5) 2) What social and criminal justice policy implications follow from an integrative-constitutive theory of crime and social justice? Why does social justice require more than fixing the criminal justice system? (Arrigo, p. 173, Q.6). 3) How does "hablas ingles?" related to constitutive criminology? Why. 4) Do you think Proposition 187 and English Only referendums are examples of immigrant bashing? Why. (from M&Z) 5) Do you think English should be the official language of the United States? Why. (from M&Z). 6) Based on the images discussed in this chapter, can Latinos and other minorities ever receive equal justice? Also, how can you, as a possible future employee within the criminal justice system, help deal with these images? (M&Z)

    • new Chaos Theory/Asian Americans pt. 1 (due Wednesday, April 9th) Note: In order to be prepared for this discussion question, you must view the documentaries, "Harsh Canvas"and "Toyo Miyatake: Infinite Shades of Gray" to be shown in class. 1) What are the essential principles of chaos theory as presented in this chapter? (Arrigo, p. 199, Q.3). 2) How can police practice, judicial procedures, and probation work advance the tenets of chaos theory? (Arrigo, p. 199, Q.6). 3) How does chaos theory relate to Asian Americans? Relate to this week's M&Z, chapters. Provide examples to better illustrate your point. 4) Relate chaos theory to the two documentaries. 5) Discuss W.I. Thomas' notion that "if men define their situation as real, then they are real in their consequences." Next, examine the implications of this notion for public policy using a contemporary example from the Asian American experiences. (from M&Z) 6) What movies and television shows can you think of that portray Asians in nonstereotypical ways? (from M&Z)



  • Special Announcements
    --- new Wednesday, April 23rd - Exam 2
    --- new Friday, May 2nd - 3rd rol due and the FINAL ABSOLUTE DEADLINE.



  • Exam 2 Study Questions

    For those opting to take Exam 2, your essay will be written on a Guided Essay Form . Exam 2 will be on Wednesday, April 23rd.

    --- 1. After reading about the five different racial/ethnic groups in the Mann & Zatz book, which Arrigo theory best fits each group? Why. Provide examples from the readings to strengthen your argument.
    --- 2. Based on the theories introduced in Arrigo's book, what do you think the relationship between criminal justice and social justice should be? Why. Which theory comes closest to your viewpoint on this relationship? Why. Incorporate the Mann and Zatz book into your argument.
    --- 3. From Mann and Zatz, do you share their conclusion of a "fragile future?" Why. Incorporate the Arrigo readings into your answer.
    --- 4. Relating to Images of Color/Images of Crime , which theoretical perspectives makes the most sense to you? Why.
    --- 5. If you could change something within the criminal justice apparatus so that the system was more consistent with critical social justice principles, what would it be? Why. Incorporate both books into your essay.


  • Recommended Reading

    --- Herbert Schiller. Mind Managers.
    --- Gaye Tuchmanl. The TV Establishment.
    --- Susan Berk-Seligson. The Bilingual Courtroom. .
    --- Luis Rodriguez. Always Running - La Vida Loca: Gang Days in LA.
    --- Rudolfo Acuna. Occupied America: A History of Chicanos.
    --- Richard Rodriguez. Hunger of Memory.
    --- Joan Moore. Going Down to the Barrio: Homeboys and Homegirls in Change.

    --- Jurgen Habermas. Between Facts and Norms.
    --- Martha Minow. Making All the Difference: Exclusion, Inclusion and American Law. Check out this link Martha Minow on the Dear Habermas site.

  • Links to the Sociology of Law Handbook readings

    -- Introduction
    -- Chapter 1, part 1
    -- Chapter 1, part 2
    -- Chapter 2


  • Important Class Related Links
    --- new Constitutive Criminology At Work related materials on the Dear Habermas site.

    W.I. Thomas "Definition of the Situation


    Past Weekly Hubpages - Spring 2003


    Past Lecture Commentaries - Spring 2003


    All UWP Classes, Fall 2002 Report of Learning (ROL)