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Susan Takata

Classes:
Sociology of Law
Corrections
Law and Social Change
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Prof. Takata.
Department of Criminal Justice
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Latest Update: February 7, 2002

UWP Local Hub Site
Dear Habermas


    Newsflash -- First ROL and grid form due beginning of class, Friday, February 15th


  • This local hub site will serve as a forum for messages about:


    All UWP Classes, Announcements
    • Friday, February 15th, beginning of class - First ROL and grid form due
    • new Friday, March 1st - Exam 1
    • Friday, March 15th - Last Day to Drop Class
    • March 17-23 - Spring Break
    • Friday, May 3rd, beginning of class - FINAL ABSOLUTE DEADLINE
    • Friday, May 10th - Last Day of Class

    • Criminal Justice Association News

      Check the Criminal Justice Department web page for future club announcement.

    All UWP Classes, Spring 2002 Report of Learning (ROL)

    All UWP Classes, web assigned readings: All UWP Classes, field trips:

      TBA

    Sociology of Law (SOCA 359)
    • Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 10 a.m. central time on the date noted)

      • Lawmaking and Precedent (due Friday, February 8th). 1) The doctrine of stare decisis means that courts will decide like cases in like manner, or that past decisions will be followed. Is there a theory of justice implicit in this doctrine? What are the sources of injustices in such a system? (Bonsignore, p.6, Q.1). 2) Do you use a precedent system in making personal decisions? Does a precedent system operate in your home, in the various classes you attend, at work, in social groups, and so on? (Bonsignore, p. 6, Q.5). 3) The court cites the Pendergrass and Joyner cases as precedent. What are the similarities between these cases and the facts of the Black case? The differences? (Bonsignore, p. 11, Q. 1). 4) What do you now see as the essential strengths and weaknesses in legal reasoning? When is legal reasoning preferable to nonlegal reasoning? If thinking like a lawyer involves careful reading of cases and legal reasoning, do you want to think like one?

      • Law and Discretion (due Wednesday, February 13th) 1) Frank himself notes that in addition to psychological determinants there are other forces affecting judgment -- political, economic and moral biases. He thought these "environmental forces" less important. Do you agree? (from Bonsignore, p. 27. Q.3) 2) ...What role should intuition play? Can intuition be cultivated and improved, or is intuition "just there"? Can intuition peacefully co-exist with professionalism and "objectivity" or are they irreversibly opposed? If any of these elements can be controlled, i.e., rules or intuition, objectivity or subjectivity, which one ought to be? (from Bonsignore, p. 27, Q.5). 3) As a member of the general public, what judge would you want to decide the case? What does your preference tell you about yourself? About professional perspectives as compared to public perspectives? (Bonsignore, p. 32. Q.2) 4) If you or a member of your family were convicted of a forgery-type offense, which judge would you prefer? ( Bonsignore, p. 32. Q.3)

      • new Law and Values (due Wednesday, February 20th). 1) Is becoming a lawyer like becoming a sorcerer? Are incoming values kept intact with the professional expertise accompanying law simply added to what a person was before the study of law or is there more of a top-to-bottom shift that accompanies becoming a lawyer? (Bonsignore, p. 44, Q. 4). 2) What problems do professionals encounter when they go wherever problems take them? For example: Should Dr. Flannery simply treat black lung or other occupationally related diseases, or must she become active in preventive medicine - mine safety, and environmental health? (Bonsignore, p. 51, Q.2a). 3) Dr. Flannery does not seem like a member of the country club set. Must she accept less income than her professional peers if she is to work with the poor? (Bonsignore, p. 52, Q. 4). 4) ... How might Marshall answer these newer "economic" arguments in favor of a revised, extended, and expedited death penalty; or the opinion polls that seem to give overwhelming support to the death penalty "without all the appeals"? Was Marshall talking to a less hardened population at the time he wrote his opinion than the current populace? (Bonsignore, p. 64, Q. 5). 5) In Chapter 2, on judging and discretion, there was some discussion of the role of intuition in decisions. Does the vivid description of an execution give rise to certain intuitions or evaluations that require no special philosophizing or gathering of pros and cons? What reactions does Orwell want to excite in his readers? Which of his images are most effective in bringing us closer to the events he wants us to understand? (Bonsignore, p. 73, Q.1).


    • Special Announcement
      --- Friday, February 15th -- First Grid and ROL due
      --- new Friday, March 1st - Exam 1

    • Recommended Readings
      --- new Kenneth Culp Davis. Discretionary Justice.
      --- Jurgen Habermas. Between Facts and Norms.
      --- Martha Minow. Making All the Difference: Exclusion, Inclusion and American Law. Check out this link Martha Minow on the Dear Habermas site.

    • Important Class Related Links

    • Links to the Sociology of Law Handbook readings
      -- Introduction
      -- Chapter 1, part 1
      -- Chapter 1, part 2
      -- Chapter 2


    Corrections (CRMJ/SOCA 363)

    • Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 11 a.m. central time on the date noted)

      • Who Goes to Prison? (due Monday, February 11th ) 1) Who goes to prison? Why. 2) Is the selection process discriminatory? Why or why not. 3) Who "belongs" in prison? Why.

      • Hassine, pt. 1 (due Wednesday, February 13th). 1) What are your reactioins (i.e., thoughts, impressions) to the first eight chapters of Life Without Parole ? What surprised you the most? Why. 2) In terms of theory, policy, practice, what do Hassine's experiences and observartions tell us about today's prison?

      • new Hassine Interviews (due Monday, February 18th). 1) In Part 2 Interviews, what is the most pressing problem in today's prison? Why. 2) If the prison experiment has failed miserably, then why do we keep building more prisons? Relate this to theory, policy, practice.

      • new Prison Violence (due Wednesday, February 20th). 1) Some people believe that the history of corrections shows a continuous movement toward more humane treatment in prisons as society, in general, has progressed. What would Hassine say? Why. What is your view? Why. 2) Compare and contrast Hassine's book with the Haas & Alpert readings on prison violence. Which came first -- the violent person creating the violent prison or prisons as a violent environment creating the violent person (or creating a more violent person)? Why.


    • Special Announcement

      --- Friday, February 15th -- First Grid and ROL due
      --- new Friday, March 1st - Exam 1

    • Recommended Readings

      --- James Austin & John Irwin. It's About Time: America's Imprisonment Binge

    • Interesting Links

      Maricopa County Sheriff's Office Jail Cam Link. Link found by Mary Frances Chachula.
      Wisconsin Department of Corrections
      Virtual Prison Tour



    Law and Social Change (CRMJ/SOCA 352)

    • Revised Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 1 p.m. central time on the date noted)

      • Habermas (due Monday, February 11th). 1) According to Habemas, what is a fact? What is a norm? 2) What is the tension between facts and norms? Provide your own example of this tension.

      • Arrigo Introduction (due Wednesday, February 13th). 1) Summarize the Arrigo Introduction. What was the main point in his introduction? 2) Why does Arrigo link critical criminology to social justice? 3) Why choose the Arrigo book for this class?

      • Radical Criminology and Socialist Feminism (due Friday, February 15th) 1) According to a radical criminologist, what is social justice? Is there a connection between criminal justice and social justice? (from Arrigo, p. 27, Q.1) 2) Imagine some of the things you have witnessed in your life that violate your sense of social justice. Discuss these with your classmates in an open forum. (from Arrigo, p. 28, Q.9). 3) How do socialist feminists explain the criminality of women? (Arrigo, p. 47, Q.4) 4) What insights about social justice does a socialist feminist perspective offer? (Arrigo, p. 47, Q.6).

      • new The Color Red and Critical Race Theory (due Monday, February 18th). 1) Think about your own views of what you have been taught about Indians. Did this reading prompt you to consider any views you have held about Indians. If so, how? (M&Z, p. 29, Q.2). 2) What are some of the factors that led to a change in attitude toward Indians? Was the change lasting or substantial? Explain. (M&Z, p. 29, Q.5). 3) How were stereotypes incorporated into the media's coverage of tribal lawsuits and legislation? (M&Z, p. 46, Q.3). 4) Briefly list the strengths and weaknesses of critical race theory as they relate to this weeks' readings on the Color Red. 5) Select one issue in criminal justice dealing with the Color Red and state how critical race analysis would be useful. Why.


    • Special Announcements

      ---Friday, February 15th -- First Grid and ROL due
      --- new Friday, March 1st - Exam 1

    • Links to Lecture Notes and Other Things

      "Who's Habermas? Why Habermas?"
      Gordon Fellman related materials on the Dear Habermas site.

    • Other Recommended Readings

      new --- Robert Blauner. Still the Big News - Racial Oppression in America.
      --- Jurgen Habermas. Between Facts and Norms.
      --- Martha Minow. Making All the Difference: Exclusion, Inclusion and American Law. Check out this link Martha Minow on the Dear Habermas site.

    • Links to the Sociology of Law Handbook readings

      -- Introduction
      -- Chapter 1, part 1
      -- Chapter 1, part 2
      -- Chapter 2


      All UWP Classes, Fall 2001 Report of Learning (ROL)