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Susan Takata

Classes:
Sociology of Law
Corrections
Law and Social Change
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Prof. Takata.
Department of Criminal Justice
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Latest Update: February 14, 2002

UWP Local Hub Site
Dear Habermas



  • This local hub site will serve as a forum for messages about:


    All UWP Classes, Announcements
    • Friday, March 1st - Exam 1
    • Friday, March 15th - Last Day to Drop Class
    • March 17-23 - Spring Break
    • Friday, May 3rd, beginning of class - FINAL ABSOLUTE DEADLINE
    • Friday, May 10th - Last Day of Class

    • Criminal Justice Association News

      Check the Criminal Justice Department web page for future club announcement.

    All UWP Classes, Spring 2002 Report of Learning (ROL)

    All UWP Classes, web assigned readings: All UWP Classes, field trips:

      TBA

    Sociology of Law (SOCA 359)
    • Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 10 a.m. central time on the date noted)

      • Law and Values (due Wednesday, February 20th). 1) Is becoming a lawyer like becoming a sorcerer? Are incoming values kept intact with the professional expertise accompanying law simply added to what a person was before the study of law or is there more of a top-to-bottom shift that accompanies becoming a lawyer? (Bonsignore, p. 44, Q. 4). 2) What problems do professionals encounter when they go wherever problems take them? For example: Should Dr. Flannery simply treat black lung or other occupationally related diseases, or must she become active in preventive medicine - mine safety, and environmental health? (Bonsignore, p. 51, Q.2a). 3) Dr. Flannery does not seem like a member of the country club set. Must she accept less income than her professional peers if she is to work with the poor? (Bonsignore, p. 52, Q. 4). 4) ... How might Marshall answer these newer "economic" arguments in favor of a revised, extended, and expedited death penalty; or the opinion polls that seem to give overwhelming support to the death penalty "without all the appeals"? Was Marshall talking to a less hardened population at the time he wrote his opinion than the current populace? (Bonsignore, p. 64, Q. 5). 5) In Chapter 2, on judging and discretion, there was some discussion of the role of intuition in decisions. Does the vivid description of an execution give rise to certain intuitions or evaluations that require no special philosophizing or gathering of pros and cons? What reactions does Orwell want to excite in his readers? Which of his images are most effective in bringing us closer to the events he wants us to understand? (Bonsignore, p. 73, Q.1).

      • new Law, Status, Wealth and Power (due Wednesday, February 27th). 1) The judge seems to be saying at the end of his opinion that the result is legally correct, but ethically wrong. What rules of law kept him from reaching the opposite conclusion? What interests stand to benefit most from such rules of law? (Bonsignore, p. 112, Q.1) 2) At the most General Motors stood to pay $23,600 to Streich. So why all the commotion and high-priced legal talent? (Bonsignore, p. 113, Q.6). 3) ... What modern-day parallels do you see to the driver-slave relationship? What difficulties would there be for slavery or for the modern organization were there no such relationships? Compare the position of the driver with the position of the doorkeeper in Kafka's parable "Before the Law." (Bonsignore, p. 117-118, Q. 3). 4) Were you to find yourself in a culture and economy with only four organizational positions -- master, overseer, driver, or slave -- which position would you prefer? Before jumping to the conclusion that the answer is obvious, consider the nature of each role and how you would be able to act and be expected to act in each. (Bonsignore, p. 118, Q4a). 5) Should the phrase "wages, hours and other terms and conditions of employment" be broad enough to include bargaining about total or partial plant closings? (Bonsignore, p. 129, Q. 2). 6) ... Using the various readings found in this chapter, evaluate the Marxian thesis. (Bonsignore, p. 140, Q.4).


    • Special Announcement
      --- new You don't have to read Bonsignore, Chapter 4
      --- Friday, March 1st - Exam 1

    • new Exam 1 Study Questions
      ---1. Unlike Llewellyn, Frank believed that for all their professional training and case study, judges make decisions just as ordinary people do, although they have much fancier ways of dressing their decisions up. What do you see to be the political implications of regarding judges as ordinary mortals? (from Bonsignore, pp. 27-28, Q. 6). Do you agree with Llewellyn or Frank? Why. And finally, how does all this relate to Kingsbury's statement:" Law is what is read, not what is written," (Bonsignore, p. 21)? Why. Provide examples from the readings or other class materials.
      --- 2. Holmes once said, "The life of law has not been logic, it has been experience." What did he mean by this? What is the case method? Evaluate its strengths and weaknesses. How valuable is the case method approach today? Why. Provide examples from the readings or other class materials.
      --- 3. According to Kafka, what is the central problem of law and what are the obstacles to its resolution? (Bonsignore, p. xix, Q.1) Why. Provide examples from the readings and other class materials.
      --- 4. In an earlier edition of the Bonsignore text, he notes, "Rule lovers drive toward certainty only to be brought up short by difficulties of interpretation and vagaries of fact. Students of discretion find choice everywhere but neglect constraint, not only from rules but also from the pressures of context." What did Bonsignore mean by this? In examining today's legal system, is the tendency toward rules or discretion? Why. Finally, do you consider yourself a rule lover or discretion lover? Why. Provide examples from the readings and other class materials.
      --- 5. What is law? What is the relationship between law and society? Why. How does all this relate to "theory, policy, practice?" Why. To better illustrate your argument, provide examples from the readings and other class materials in your essay.

    • Recommended Readings
      --- new Emile Durkheim. The Division of Labor in Society.
      --- new Robert Merton. Social Theory and Social Structure.
      --- new Jeffrey Reiman The Rich Get Richer and the Poor Get Prison.
      --- Jurgen Habermas. Between Facts and Norms.
      --- Martha Minow. Making All the Difference: Exclusion, Inclusion and American Law. Check out this link Martha Minow on the Dear Habermas site.

    • Important Class Related Links

    • Links to the Sociology of Law Handbook readings
      -- Introduction
      -- Chapter 1, part 1
      -- Chapter 1, part 2
      -- Chapter 2


    Corrections (CRMJ/SOCA 363)

    • Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 11 a.m. central time on the date noted)

      • Hassine Interviews (due Monday, February 18th). 1) In Part 2 Interviews, what is the most pressing problem in today's prison? Why. 2) If the prison experiment has failed miserably, then why do we keep building more prisons? Relate this to theory, policy, practice.

      • Prison Violence (due Wednesday, February 20th). 1) Some people believe that the history of corrections shows a continuous movement toward more humane treatment in prisons as society, in general, has progressed. What would Hassine say? Why. What is your view? Why. 2) Compare and contrast Hassine's book with the Haas & Alpert readings on prison violence. Which came first -- the violent person creating the violent prison or prisons as a violent environment creating the violent person (or creating a more violent person)? Why.

      • new Prison Guards (due Monday, February 25th). Note: Relate your answers to the documentary, "Quiet Rage" to be shown in class. . 1) Compare and contrast the Haas and Alpert articles on prison guards and staff members to what Hassine describes in his book. What are the differences? What are the similarities? 2) What are some of the difficulties confronting today's prison guards and staff members? Why. What might help to overcome these difficulties? Why.


    • new Exam 1 Study Questions
      --- 1. (As promised) in examining the "History of Corrections in America" handout, what would be the correctional model that best depicts the period from the 1990s to date? Why. Incorporate examples from the readings into your argument.
      --- 2. The four goals of criminal sanctions are retribution, deterrence, incapacitation and rehabilitation. Discuss each of these goals. Which goal is the most dominant today? Why. Provide examples from the readings and other class materials.
      --- 3. Based on the readings and other class materials, compare and contrast "who goes to prison?" with "who belongs in prison?" What does this tell us about the interrelationship between "theory, policy, practice?" Why.
      --- 4. How does "doing time" as explained in the Haas and Alpert book compare with the experiences of Hassine? Why. What does this tell us about "theory, policy, and practice?" Why. Be sure to provide examples from both books.
      --- 5. Based on Life Without Parole, do you think "the punishment fit the crime" for Hassine? Relate you answer to the interrelationship between "theory, policy, practice." Why.

    • Special Announcement
      --- Friday, March 1st - Exam 1

    • Recommended Readings
      --- new Leonard Peltier. Prison Writings.
      --- new Rubin "Hurricane" Carter. The Sixteenth Round.
      --- new The Autobiography of Malcolm X.
      --- new Jack Henry Abbott. In the Belly of the Beast.
      --- James Austin & John Irwin. It's About Time: America's Imprisonment Binge

    • Interesting Links

      Maricopa County Sheriff's Office Jail Cam Link. Link found by Mary Frances Chachula.
      Wisconsin Department of Corrections
      Virtual Prison Tour



    Law and Social Change (CRMJ/SOCA 352)

    • Revised Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 1 p.m. central time on the date noted)


      • Marxist Criminology and Socialist Feminism (due Friday, February 15th) 1) According to a radical criminologist, what is social justice? Is there a connection between criminal justice and social justice? (from Arrigo, p. 27, Q.1) 2) Imagine some of the things you have witnessed in your life that violate your sense of social justice. Discuss these with your classmates in an open forum. (from Arrigo, p. 28, Q.9). 3) How do socialist feminists explain the criminality of women? (Arrigo, p. 47, Q.4) 4) What insights about social justice does a socialist feminist perspective offer? (Arrigo, p. 47, Q.6).

      • The Color Red and Critical Race Theory (due Monday, February 18th). 1) Think about your own views of what you have been taught about Indians. Did this reading prompt you to consider any views you have held about Indians. If so, how? (M&Z, p. 29, Q.2). 2) What are some of the factors that led to a change in attitude toward Indians? Was the change lasting or substantial? Explain. (M&Z, p. 29, Q.5). 3) How were stereotypes incorporated into the media's coverage of tribal lawsuits and legislation? (M&Z, p. 46, Q.3). 4) Briefly list the strengths and weaknesses of critical race theory as they relate to this weeks' readings on the Color Red. 5) Select one issue in criminal justice dealing with the Color Red and state how critical race analysis would be useful. Why.

      • new Peacemaking Crim and the Color Red (due Wednesday, February 27th). The documentary, "Incident at Oglala" will be shown in class. 1) After viewing "Incident at Oglala" how might peacemaking criminology be applied? Would it work? Why. 2) In what respects may peacemaking be said to be both a more pessimistic and optimistic approach to social control than warmaking? (Arrigo, p. 69, Q.6). 3) Where might you begin to try making peace? (Arrigo, p. 69, Q.7). 4) Is Leonard Peltier guilty or not guilty? Why. 5) What makes American Indians different from other racial groups in America? (M&Z, p. 56, Q.1). 6) What is meant by a dual justice system? Provide a detailed definition of both paradigms. Then compare and contrast the competing paradigms. Finally, discuss the implications of this dual justice system.


    • Special Announcements
      --- Friday, March 1st - Exam 1

    • new Exam 1 Study Questions
      --- 1. Of all the theories covered so far -- Marxist criminology, socialist feminism, critical race theory or peacemaking criminology -- which theory makes the most sense in terms of "law and social change"? Relate your response to "theory, policy, practice." Why. Be sure to provide examples from the readings and other class materials.
      --- 2. According to Arrigo, what is the relationship between social justice and criminal justice? Which theory -- Marxist criminology, socialist feminism, critical race theory or peacemaking criminology -- do you agree with the most? Why.
      -- 3. What do Mann and Zatz mean when they say that race is a "social construction"? Do you agree or disagree with Mann and Zatz? Why. Finally, how does this relate to the "tension" between facts and norms, according to Habermas? Provide examples from the readings and other materials in order to strengthen your argument.
      -- 4. Of all the theories covered so far -- Marxist criminology, socialist feminism, critical race theory or peacemaking criminology, which theory is most applicable to the American Indian experience? Why. Be sure to provide examples from the readings and other class materials.
      -- 5. Applying Habermas' notion of the "tension between facts and norms," what might be some examples from the American Indian past, present and future? Why. In your opinion, what is the most pressing "tension" and what are some possible remedies? Why.

    • Links to Lecture Notes and Other Things

      "Who's Habermas? Why Habermas?"
      Gordon Fellman related materials on the Dear Habermas site.

    • Other Recommended Readings
      --- new Dee Brown. Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee.
      --- new M. Scott Momaday. House Made of Dawn .
      --- new Nancy Lurie. Mountain Wolf Woman .
      --- new Mary Crow Dog. Lakota Woman.
      --- new Leonard Peltier. Prison Writings .
      --- Jurgen Habermas. Between Facts and Norms.
      --- Martha Minow. Making All the Difference: Exclusion, Inclusion and American Law. Check out this link Martha Minow on the Dear Habermas site.

    • Links to the Sociology of Law Handbook readings

      -- Introduction
      -- Chapter 1, part 1
      -- Chapter 1, part 2
      -- Chapter 2


      All UWP Classes, Fall 2001 Report of Learning (ROL)