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Susan Takata

Classes:
Sociology of Law
Corrections
Law and Social Change
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Main Hub Sites:
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Prof. Takata.
Department of Criminal Justice
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Latest Update: February 28, 2002

UWP Local Hub Site
Dear Habermas


    Newsflash!!

    My classes will not be meeting on Friday, March 8th. The self-tests are still due by beginning of class time for Sociology of Law and Corrections. Use the time to work on your creative measures!
  • This local hub site will serve as a forum for messages about:


    All UWP Classes, Announcements
    • newWednesday, March 6th - Three excellent documentaries will be shown in my classes. Students not enrolled in these courses but are in other courses of mine are welcome to attend: 10-10:50 a.m. in Sociology of Law - "Zoot Suit Riots." 11-11:50 a.m. in Corrections - "Prison Gangs and Racism." 1-1:50 p.m. in Law and Social Change - "Cops Under Fire." All three classes meet in Moln D132.
    • new Friday, March 8th - No Class Meeting
    • Friday, March 15th - Last Day to Drop Class
    • March 17-23 - Spring Break
    • Friday, March 29th, beginning of class - 2nd grid form & ROL due
    • Friday, May 3rd, beginning of class - FINAL ABSOLUTE DEADLINE
    • Friday, May 10th - Last Day of Class

    • Criminal Justice Association News

      Check the Criminal Justice Department web page for future club announcement.

    All UWP Classes, Spring 2002 Report of Learning (ROL)

    All UWP Classes, web assigned readings: All UWP Classes, field trips:

      TBA

    Sociology of Law (SOCA 359)
    • Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 10 a.m. central time on the date noted)

      • Law and Popular Will (due Friday, March 8th). Note: Relate your answers to the documentary, "Zoot Suit Riots." 1) What is the relationship between anarchy and democracy? (Bonsignore, p. 153, Q.7). And, how does this relate to the "Zoot Suit Riots?" 2) Make an inventory of articles from a newspaper relating to state law or institutional rules and policies. Assess whether the writers are calling for more law, less law or different law. How anarchical does your inventory suggest people to be? (Bonsignore, p. 153, Q.10). 3) Here there are two characters. What does the description of each tell us and how might we use Kafka's insights to better understand power and the lack of it? (Bonsignore, p. 157, Q.1). 4) Return to the epigram at the start of this chapter that describes a peasant who bows deeply and then silently farts. What does this epigram tell us about power relationships? What might the king's reaction to learning that the peasant's bow was followed by a fart? (Bonsignore, p. 157, Q.2). 5) There is also tension between the medical community and drug law enforcers. Does marijuana have proven therapeutic uses, or is the California referendum just a way to begin to legalize marijuana? ( Bonsignore, p. 163, Q.2). 6) There is a battle over sexual preferences taking place in churches, in schools, and in the courts. What should be the place of legal institutions in cultural battles? Before concluding that the courts should stay out of them, remember from our earliest case study that nonintervention is never neutral. (Bonsignore, p. 172, Q.5).

      • Feminism/Habermas (due Friday, March 15th). 1) ... How can legal regulation or company policies be drawn in order to both take into account manifest industrial hazards AND avoid discrimination based on gender or the possibility of pregnancy? (Bonsignore, p. 188-189, Q.1). 2) What transformation in feminist analysis of gender would be required? (Bonsignore, p. 200, Q.2). 3) If there are groups or situations for which the law does not produce just results, then do we lose legitimacy? Do we lose some of our social integration? And at what point does that become critical? 4) According to Habermas, what is a fact and a norm? What is the tension between facts and norms? Provide your own example. What is the tension between facts and norms in the documentary, "Zoot Suit Riots"(to be shown in class on March 6th). Note: In order to answer the last two questions, you need to read the early chapters of "The Sociology of Law Handbook" linked below.


    • Special Announcement
      --- new Friday, March 8th - No class meeting. Self-test is still due by class time. Work on creative measures.
      --- Friday, March 29th - 2nd rol & grid form due

    • Exam 2 Study Questions
      --- not up yet

    • Recommended Readings
      --- new Howard Becker. Outsiders. --- Jurgen Habermas. Between Facts and Norms.
      --- Martha Minow. Making All the Difference: Exclusion, Inclusion and American Law. Check out this link Martha Minow on the Dear Habermas site.

    • Important Class Related Links
      --- "Who's Habermas? Why Habermas?"

    • Links to the Sociology of Law Handbook readings
      -- Introduction
      -- Chapter 1, part 1
      -- Chapter 1, part 2
      -- Chapter 2


    Corrections (CRMJ/SOCA 363)

    • Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 11 a.m. central time on the date noted)

      • Courts & Corrections (due Monday, March 4th). Note: Relate your answers to the documentary, "Hard Time" to be shown in class. 1) How have offender rights been developed by the courts? What is the interrelationship between "theory, policy, practice" when it comes to courts and corrections? 2) Do prisoners give up their rights and privileges as punishment for the crime(s) committed? How do we balance between the protection of the prisoner's rights and the commuity's need to punish? 3) What did you like best about Hassine's Life Without Parole? What did you like least about the book? Why. 4) How does Hassine's conclusion relate to "courts and corrections?" Do you agree with his conclusion? Why.

      • The Rehabilitation Debate (due Friday, March 8th) Note: Relate your answers to the documentary, "Prison Gangs and Racism" to be shown in class. 1) Who is the typical inmate in Supermax prisons? 2) Why does the Supermax prison provide the best metaphor for moral bankruptcy about crime and corrections? 3) Based on the readings and other materials, does rehabilitation work? Why. 4) What are the arguments on both sides of the rehabilitation debate? Which side do you take? Why.



    • Exam 2 Study Questions
      --- not up yet

    • Special Announcement
      --- new Friday, March 8th - No class meeting. Self test is still due before class time. Work on creative measures.
      --- Friday, March 29th - 2nd rol & grid form due

    • Recommended Readings
      --- Leonard Peltier. Prison Writings.
      --- Rubin "Hurricane" Carter. The Sixteenth Round.
      --- The Autobiography of Malcolm X.
      --- Jack Henry Abbott. In the Belly of the Beast.
      --- James Austin & John Irwin. It's About Time: America's Imprisonment Binge

    • Interesting Links

      Maricopa County Sheriff's Office Jail Cam Link. Link found by Mary Frances Chachula.
      Wisconsin Department of Corrections
      Virtual Prison Tour



    Law and Social Change (CRMJ/SOCA 352)

    • Revised Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 1 p.m. central time on the date noted)

      • Prophetic Criticism and the Color Black (due Monday, March 4th). 1) What is prophetic criticism? (Arrigo, p. 89, Q.1). 2) What role do individuals assume in creating and sustaining prophetic justice? (Arrigo, p. 89, Q.7). 3) Mann & Zatz state: "... It is striking that all of the authors in this section share a common ideological thread: the unwarranted stigmatization of African Americans, especially African American males, through the use of assumptions about urban violence (although a majority of the inner-city Afircan Americans are nonviolent) and drug involvement (although the majority of African Americans do not use drugs)," (p. 74). Why do these "unwarranted stigmatizations" persist? 4) Based on Chapters 6 & 7 in Mann & Zatz, what is the solution to alleviating racist stereotyping? Why.

      • Derrick Bell (due Monday, March 11th). 1) What was your "gut-level" reaction to the "Racial Preference Licensing Act?" 2) What was the author trying to tell you? Why. 3) What part of this article did you agree with the most? the least? Why. 4) How does this article relate to law and social change? to "Minow's "dilemma of difference?" to "theory, policy, practice?

      • new Anarchist Criminology and the Color Black pt. 2 (due Wednesday, March 13th) Note: You will need to view "Cops Under Fire," to be shown on March 6th in order to answer these questions. 1) Identify and explain at least two police practices that are directed specifically at the black community. (M &Z, p. 125, Q. 3). 2) Relate "Cops Under Fire" to anarchist criminology. Provide examples to better illustrate your point. 3) How does "Cops Under Fire" relate to "theory, policy, practice"? 4) Ambiguity is commonly seen as a negative state of affairs, to be resolved or overcome. How is ambiguity redefined in a positive light within a model of anarchist justice? Do you agree that ambiguity and uncertainty can have positive effects? (Arrigo, p. 106, Q.2). 5) Anarchist justice incorporates the notion that we should protect and promote diversity and difference among people - that "anything goes". Within the model of anarchist justice, though, where are the limits to his notion that "anything goes?" Where would you set the limits? Why. (Arrigo, p. 106, Q. 4)


    • Special Announcements
      --- new Friday, March 8th - No class meeting. Work on creative measures.
      --- Friday, March 29th - 2nd rol & grid form due

    • Exam 2 Study Questions
      --- not up yet.

    • Links to Lecture Notes and Other Things
      --- Peacemaking Index of materials on Dear Habermas.
      --- "Who's Habermas? Why Habermas?"
      --- Gordon Fellman related materials on the Dear Habermas site.

    • Other Recommended Readings
      --- new Derrick Bell. Faces at the Bottom of the Well.
      --- new Derrick Bell. Race, Racism and American Law.
      --- new Randall Kennedy. Race, Crime and the Law .
      --- new Marc Mauer. Race to Incarcerate
      --- new David Cole. No Equal Justice: Race and Class in the American Justice System.
      --- new Jerome Miller. Search and Destroy: African-American Males in the Criminal Justice System.
      --- new The Autobiography of Malcolm X.
      --- new Robert Blauner. Still the Big New: Racial Oppression in America.

      --- Jurgen Habermas. Between Facts and Norms.
      --- Martha Minow. Making All the Difference: Exclusion, Inclusion and American Law. Check out this link Martha Minow on the Dear Habermas site.

    • Links to the Sociology of Law Handbook readings

      -- Introduction
      -- Chapter 1, part 1
      -- Chapter 1, part 2
      -- Chapter 2


      All UWP Classes, Fall 2001 Report of Learning (ROL)