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Susan Takata

Classes:
Sociology of Law
Corrections
Law and Social Change
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Prof. Takata.
Department of Criminal Justice
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Latest Update: March 28, 2002

UWP Local Hub Site
Dear Habermas


    NEWSFLASH -- April 1-12, 2002 - Fall 2002 Advising


  • This local hub site will serve as a forum for messages about:


    All UWP Classes, Announcements
    • April 1-12 -- Advising for Fall 2002. Be sure to contact your academic adviser.
    • new Weds, April 3rd, 7p.m. --"Racial Profiling and Imprisonment Rates" - Pamela Oliver. Orchard Room at Tallent Hall.
    • new Thursday, April 4th, 3:30-5 p.m.--"Racial Profiling and Imprisonment Rates" - Pamela Oliver. 107 Molinaro Hall.
    • new Wednesday, April 10th, 11-11:50 a.m. - Criminal Justice Alumni Day Guest Lecturer(s). D132 Molinaro Hall.
    • Monday, April 15th -- Registration for Fall 2002 Classes
    • new Wednesday, April 17th, 3:30-5:30 pm, Ellsworth Correctional Center Site Visit
    • Friday, April 26th -- Exam 2
    • Friday, May 3rd , beginning of class - 3rd grid form & ROL due
    • Friday, May 3rd, beginning of class - FINAL ABSOLUTE DEADLINE
    • May 6-10 -- Presentation of Creative Measures; Report of Debriefings; Theory, Policy, Practice Discussions
    • Friday, May 10th - Last Day of Class

    • Criminal Justice Association News

      Check the Criminal Justice Department web page for future club announcement.

    All UWP Classes, Spring 2002 Report of Learning (ROL)

    All UWP Classes, web assigned readings: All UWP Classes, site visits:

    • new Wednesday, April 17th, 3:30-5:30 pm, Ellsworth Correctional Center Site Visit -- If you are interested in attending, please email me. "First come, first serve" basis with a maximum of 30 students. As of March 28th, 17 students have signed up for this site visit.

    Sociology of Law (SOCA 359)
    • Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 10 a.m. central time on the date noted)

      • Force of Law (due Wednesday, April 3rd) Note: In order to be prepared for this self-test, you need to view the documentary, "End of the Night Stick" to be shown in class. 1) What is the tension between fact and norm in the documentary, "End of the Night Stick?" Why. 2) How would each theorist -- a structural functionalist, a Marxist, a symbolic interactionist, and a Habermasian theorist -- interpret and critique the documentary, "End of the Night Stick"? Why. Finally, which theoretical interpretation do you agree with the most? Why. 3) Do you think these images of law should have been given to prisoners? Why. (from Bonsignore, p. 217, Q.1). 4) If Darrow thinks that jails are the invention of the ruling class, how can he say that some people are "born with the tendency to break into jail"? (from Bonsignore, p. 217, Q.2) 5) Diamond says that custom is definite and known, whereas law is vague and uncertain. What does he mean? Why. (from Bonsignore, p. 228, Q.1).

      • Rule of Law/Surveillance (due Friday, April 5th) 1) Do you agree that there is widespread disenchantment with law? What current examples of this can you find? What examples of belief in law can you find? (from Bonsignore, p. 236, Q.1) 2) What are the sources of disenchantment or belief? Do the mass media tend in either direction in presenting legal issues? Why. (from Bonsignore, p. 236, Q.2) 3) What social institutions besides slavery can you think of where personal domination is supported by law? Does managerial control of employees fall into this category? teachers' control of students? parents' control of children? husbands' of wives? In each of these situations, what images of the relationship between dominant person(s) and the society does the law enforce? Why. (from Bonsignore, p. 246, Q.3). 4) Why did Chief Justice Warren say that the exclusionary rule is not very effective in regulating police actions in which arrest is not the police officer's aim? Why. (from Bonsignore, p. 278, Q.1). 5) ... Does this mean that the validity of police conduct is dependent on how articulate the officer is? Does this case provide a "script" for officers to use in describing their actions? Why. (from Bonsignore, p. 281, Q.2)

      • new Lawyers (due Wednesday, April 10th). Note: In order to be prepared for this self-test, you need to view the documentary, "Ethics on Trial." Incorporate "Ethics on Trial" into your answers. . 1) Florynce Kennedy said, "[T]he law is a hustle..." (Bonsignore, p. 297). What did she mean by this? How would the four sociological perspectives explain/interpret this statement? Which interpretation do you agree with the most? Why? 2) Tocqueville states that lawyers "are less afraid of tyranny than of arbitrary power" and that they can turn despotism into "the external features of justice and law." What do these ideas imply in the context of a democratic society? (Bonsignore, p. 302, Q. 3). 3) Kennedy says that people generally accept the idea that hierarchies express the net value of each individual's worth, and thus they also accept not only other people's unequal relationship to themselves, but also their own location in unequal systems. Do you agree? Why? (Bonsignore, p. 336, Q.3). 4) Professor Williams, by taking up the student's cause, comes to suffer the same fate as the student -- ostracism and blaming the victim. What does this imply about law school culture, pedagogy, and hierarchies, and about advocacy? (Bonsignore, p. 343, Q. 2) 5) ... Should there be any limits to a lawyer's advocacy? Should society have any interest in the lawyer-client relationship so long as the lawyer is ethical? (Bonsignore, p. 350, Q. 3 -- You need to read this question in its entirety) 6) Curtis claims that lawyers must be understood as playing a game. Lawyers commonly refer to legal practice as a game. Why is that? Other professionals - doctors, ministers, engineers, social workers, scientists, academics - don't do it. . . (Bonsignore, p. 350, Q. 4. Read the last part of this question in your textbook).

      • new Law Stories - First 3 (due Friday, April 12th). 1) What is structural violence? How does structural violence relate to "Welfare Stories?" Why. 2) How would the 4 sociological perspectives (SF, M, SI and HT) explain the story, "Maintaining the Status Quo"? Which theoretical explanation do you agree with the most? Why? 3) What is the tension between facts and norms in "We Are All We've Got"? How might the tension be resolved, according to Habermas? Why. 4) What does silence and silencing have to do with the first three stories in this book? Why.



    • Special Announcement
      --- April 1-12 -- Advising for Fall 2002. Be sure to contact your academic adviser.
      --- new Weds, April 3rd, 7p.m. --"Racial Profiling and Imprisonment Rates" - Pamela Oliver. Orchard Room at Tallent Hall.
      --- new Thursday, April 4th, 3:30-5 p.m.--"Racial Profiling and Imprisonment Rates" - Pamela Oliver. 107 Molinaro Hall.
      --- new Weds, April 10th, 11-11:50 a.m. - Criminal Justice Alumni Day Guest Lecturer(s). D132 Molinaro Hall.
      --- Monday, April 15th -- Registration for Fall 2002 Classes
      --- new Wednesday, April 17th, 3:30-5:30 pm, Ellsworth Correctional Center Site Visit.
      --- Friday, April 26th -- Exam 2
      --- Friday, May 3rd , beginning of class - 3rd grid form & ROL due
      --- Friday, May 3rd, beginning of class - FINAL ABSOLUTE DEADLINE
      --- May 6-10 -- Presentation of Creative Measures; Report of Debriefings; Theory, Policy, Practice Discussions
      --- Friday, May 10th - Last Day of Class

    • new Exam 2 Study Questions
      --- 1. Select one -- law enforcement, lawyers or juries, and explain the most pressing ethical dilemma within this particular aspect of the legal process. Utilizing the four sociological perspectives (structural functionalism, Marxism, symbolic interactionism and Habermasian theory), what solutions would each perspective propose? Why.
      --- 2. In an earlier edition, Bonsignore states: "Law is almost always involved with issues of self and other, and often involved with issues of life and death." What did he mean by this? How does this statement relate to Law Stories?Why.
      --- 3. Chief Justice Warren Burger stated: "Our system is too costly, too painful, too destructive, too inefficient for a truly civilized people." How does this statement relate to Law Stories? Why.
      --- 4. According to Donald Kingsbury, "Law is what is read, not what is written," (Bonsignore, p. 21). Apply this statement to one of the following -- law enforcement, lawyers, the jury or conflict resolution. Explain which of the four theoretical perspectives (structural functionalism, Marxism, symbolic interactionism or Habermasian theory) best fits this statement? Why.
      --- 5. "In some areas of law, the image of freedom is dominant; in others, the image of obedience is" (earlier edition of Bonsignore). How does this relate to Law Stories? Why. Which image of law do you agree with the most? Why.

    • Recommended Readings
      --- Jerome H. Skolnick and James J. Fyfe. Above the Law: Police and the Excessive Use of Force.
      --- Peter K. Manning. Police Work.
      --- Samuel Walker. The Police in America: An Introduction.
      --- Peter MacDonald. From the Cop Shop.
      --- Jim Dwyer, Peter Neufield, and Barry Scheck. Five Days to Execution and Other Dispatches from the Wrongly Accused.
      --- Kenneth J. Peak and Ronald W. Glensor. Community Policing and Problem Solving: Strategies and Practices.
      --- Richard A. Leo, et al., eds. The Miranda Debate: Law, Justice, and Policing.
      --- Anthony Lewis. Gideon's Trumpet.
      --- Jurgen Habermas. Between Facts and Norms.
      --- Martha Minow. Making All the Difference: Exclusion, Inclusion and American Law. Check out this link Martha Minow on the Dear Habermas site.

    • Important Class Related Links
      --- "Who's Habermas? Why Habermas?"

    • Links to the Sociology of Law Handbook readings
      -- Introduction
      -- Chapter 1, part 1
      -- Chapter 1, part 2
      -- Chapter 2


    Corrections (CRMJ/SOCA 363)

    • Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 11 a.m. central time on the date noted)

      • Community Corrections (due Monday, April 1st) 1) What are the differences and similarities between probation and parole? 2) What is the purpose of probation? What is the purpose of parole? 3) How does the use of probation effect the correctional system? Why is it used so extensively? How does the use of parole impact on today's correctional system? Why. 4) How could the investigation and supervisory functions of probation be most effectively organized? Given these two organizational tasks, how should a probation officer parcel his/her time and efforts? Why.

      • Holes-Beginning (due Friday, April 5th) 1) How does the "institutionalization" of Stanley compare to that of Victor Hassine's experience? Why. 2) What are your early impressions of Holes?

      • new Holes - Middle (due Friday, April 12th) 1) Compare and contrast the formal structure and informal structure of Camp Green Lake in terms of survival, and in terms of "inmate-guard" relations. 2) What is the purpose of digging holes from a correctional perspective? Why. 3) What role does race relations play in this book, so far? How does this compare to Hassine's observations? Why.

      • new Special Populations (due Monday, April 15th) Note: In order to be prepared for this self-test, you need to view the documentary, "Voices From Inside" to be shown in class. What are some unique problems and challenges when dealing with the HIV-positive prisoner? the elderly prisoner? the female prisoner? the mentally ill prisoner? Why. 2) As a follow-up, what might be some solutions relating the the problems of the HIV-positive prisoner? the elderly prisoner? the female prisoner? the mentally ill prisoner? Why.


    • new Exam 2 Study Questions
      --- 1. Compare and contrast jails and prisons. And then, compare and contrast probation and parole. Discuss one of these aspects of corrections as it relates to "theory, policy, practice."
      --- 2. Compare and contrast the correctional experience of Hassine in Life Without Parole with that of Stanley in Holes. What can we learn from both experiences as they relate to "theory, policy, practice?" Why.
      --- 3. What is the most serious problem in corrections today? Why. How does this selected problem and its solutions relate to "theory, policy, and practice?" Why. Be sure to incorporate the readings into your essay.
      --- 4. Charles Logan notes: "We ask them to correct the incorrigible, rehabilitate the wretched, deter the determined, restrain the dangerous and punish the wicked." What does Logan mean? How does this compare to Hassine's assessment of corrections? And, finally, how does this relate to "theory, policy, and practice"? Why.
      --- 5. Based on the readings and other materials introduced in this course, what is the future of correctional "theories, policies and practices?" Why.

    • Special Announcement
      --- April 1-12 -- Advising for Fall 2002. Be sure to contact your academic adviser.
      --- new Weds, April 3rd, 7p.m. --"Racial Profiling and Imprisonment Rates" - Pamela Oliver. Orchard Room at Tallent Hall.
      --- new Thursday, April 4th, 3:30-5 p.m.--"Racial Profiling and Imprisonment Rates" - Pamela Oliver. 107 Molinaro Hall.
      --- new Tuesday, April 9th, 7 p.m. -- Site Visit of Downtown Kenosha County Jail with Janetta Sepanski. Email me if you are interested in attending this site visit.
      --- new Weds, April 10th, 11-11:50 a.m. - Criminal Justice Alumni Day Guest Lecturer(s). D132 Molinaro Hall.
      --- Monday, April 15th -- Registration for Fall 2002 Classes
      --- new Wednesday, April 17th, 3:30-5:30 pm, Ellsworth Correctional Center Site Visit.
      --- Friday, April 26th -- Exam 2
      --- Friday, May 3rd , beginning of class - 3rd grid form & ROL due
      --- Friday, May 3rd, beginning of class - FINAL ABSOLUTE DEADLINE
      --- May 6-10 -- Presentation of Creative Measures; Report of Debriefings; Theory, Policy, Practice Discussions
      --- Friday, May 10th - Last Day of Class

    • Recommended Readings
      --- Howard Abadinsky. Probation and Parole: Theory and Practice.
      --- Gwyneth Boswell. Contemporary Probation Practice.
      --- Robert M. Carter, Daniel Glaser, and Leslie T. Wilkins. Probation, Parole and Community Corrections.
      --- Thomas Ellsworth. Contemporary Community Corrections.
      --- Peter Burke. Abolishing Parole: Why the Emperor Has No Clothes.
      --- Edward J. Latessa and Harry E. Allen. Corrections in the Community.
      --- James Austin & John Irwin. It's About Time: America's Imprisonment Binge

    • Interesting Links

      Annotations on Louis Sachar's Holes

      The Problem with Incarcerating Mothers

      Maricopa County Sheriff's Office Jail Cam Link. Link found by Mary Frances Chachula.

      Wisconsin Department of Corrections

      Virtual Prison Tour



    Law and Social Change (CRMJ/SOCA 352)

    • Revised Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 1 p.m. central time on the date noted)

      • Constitutive Criminology/Color Brown pt. 2 (due Wednesday, April 3rd) Note: In order to be prepared for this exercise, you must view the documentary, "hablas ingles?" Be sure to incorporate "hablas ingles?" in your answers to the following questions: 1) Why is it important to understand socially constructed differences when considering social justice in a postmodern society? Provide examples of how these differences build toward inequalities. (from Arrigo, p. 173, Q. 5) 2) What social and criminal justice policy implications follow from an integrative-constitutive theory of crime and social justice? Why does social justice require more than fixing the criminal justice system? (Arrigo, p. 173, Q.6). 3) How does "hablas ingles?" related to constitutive criminology? Why. 4) Do you think Proposition 187 and English Only referendums are examples of immigrant bashing? Why. (from M&Z, p. 155, Q.3) 5) Do you think English should be the official language of the United States? Why. (from M&Z, p. 155, Q.5). 6) Based on the images discussed in this chapter, can Latinos and other minorities ever receive equal justice? Also, how can you, as a possible future employee within the criminal justice system, help deal with these images? (M&Z, p. 165, Q.2)

      • new Chaos Theory/Color Yellow pt. 1 (due Friday, April 12th). Note: In order to be prepared for this self-test, you must view the documentaries, "Slaying the Dragon," and "Harsh Canvas," to be shown in class. 1) What are the essential principles of chaos theory as presented in this chapter? (Arrigo, p. 199, Q.3). 2) How can police practice, judicial procedures, and probation work advance the tenets of chaos theory? (Arrigo, p. 199, Q.6). 3) How does chaos theory relate to the Color Yellow (M&Z, chapters 14 & 15)? Provide examples to better illustrate your point. 4) Relate chaos theory to the documentaries, "Slaying the Dragon," and "Harsh Canvas." 5) Discuss W.I. Thomas' notion that "if men define their situation as real, then they are real in their consequences." Then examine the implications of this notion for public policy using a contemporary example from the Asian American experience. (M&Z, p. 178, Q.3) 6) What movies and television shows can you think of that portray Asians in nonstereotypical ways? (M&Z, p. 187, Q.3)


    • Special Announcements
      --- new March 29th and April 1st, 10-10:50 a.m. - "The End of the Night Stick" documentary to be shown in D132 Moln.
      --- April 1-12 -- Advising for Fall 2002. Be sure to contact your academic adviser.
      --- new Weds, April 3rd, 7p.m. --"Racial Profiling and Imprisonment Rates" - Pamela Oliver. Orchard Room at Tallent Hall.
      --- new Thursday, April 4th, 3:30-5 p.m.--"Racial Profiling and Imprisonment Rates" - Pamela Oliver. 107 Molinaro Hall.
      --- new Weds, April 10th, 11-11:50 a.m. - Criminal Justice Alumni Day Guest Lecturer(s). D132 Molinaro Hall.
      --- Monday, April 15th -- Registration for Fall 2002 Classes
      --- new Wednesday, April 17th, 3:30-5:30 pm, Ellsworth Correctional Center Site Visit.
      --- Friday, April 26th -- Exam 2
      --- Friday, May 3rd , beginning of class - 3rd grid form & ROL due
      --- Friday, May 3rd, beginning of class - FINAL ABSOLUTE DEADLINE
      --- May 6-10 -- Presentation of Creative Measures; Report of Debriefings; Theory, Policy, Practice Discussions
      --- Friday, May 10th - Last Day of Class

    • new Exam 2 Study Questions
      --- 1. After reading about the Colors Red, Black, Brown and Yellow, and the Invisible Color White, which Arrigo theories best fit for each group? Why. Provide examples from the readings to strengthen your argument.
      --- 2. Based on the theories introduced in Arrigo's book, what do you think the relationship between criminal justice and social justice should be? Why. Which theory comes closest to your viewpoint on this relationship? Why. Incorporate the Mann and Zatz book into your argument.
      --- 3. From Mann and Zatz, do you share their cautious optimism about the diminution of institutional racism beyond the millennium? Why. Incorporate the Arrigo readings into your answer.
      --- 4. Relating to Images of Color/Images of Crime , which theoretical perspectives makes the most sense to you? Why.
      --- 5. If you could change something within the criminal justice apparatus so that the system was more consistent with critical social justice principles, what would it be? Why. Incorporate both books into your essay.

    • Links to Lecture Notes and Other Things
      --- new Constitutive Criminology At Work related materials on the Dear Habermas site.

    • Other Recommended Readings
      --- Herbert Schiller. The Mind Managers.
      --- Gaye Tuchman. The TV Establishment.
      --- Susan Berk-Seligson . The Bilingual Courtroom.
      --- Luis Rodriguez. Always Running -- La Vida Loca: Gang Days in L.A.
      --- Rudolfo Acuna. Occupied America: A History of Chicanos.
      --- Richard Rodriguez. Hunger of Memory.
      --- Joan Moore. Going Down to the Barrio: Homeboys and Homegirls in Change.
      --- Joan Moore. Homeboys: Gangs, Drugs and prison in the barrios of Los Angeles.

      --- Jurgen Habermas. Between Facts and Norms.
      --- Martha Minow. Making All the Difference: Exclusion, Inclusion and American Law. Check out this link Martha Minow on the Dear Habermas site.

    • Links to the Sociology of Law Handbook readings

      -- Introduction
      -- Chapter 1, part 1
      -- Chapter 1, part 2
      -- Chapter 2


      All UWP Classes, Fall 2001 Report of Learning (ROL)