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Susan Takata

Classes:
Sociology of Law
Corrections
Law and Social Change
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Prof. Takata.
Department of Criminal Justice
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Latest Update: April 4, 2002

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Dear Habermas


    NEWSFLASH -- Criminal Justice Alumni Day Panel Discussion

    Wednesday, April 10th, 11-11:50 a.m. in Moln D132
    Tentative panelists: Lt. Al Days, Racine Police Department; Karen Grabher, UWP Criminal Justice Department & CJ bilingual interpreter; Lynda Jackson, Racine County Jail Chaplaincy Program; Robert Jambois, Kenosha County District Attorney and Daryl Kastenson, Milwaukee County Public Defender


  • This local hub site will serve as a forum for messages about:


    All UWP Classes, Announcements
    • Wednesday, April 10th, 11-11:50 a.m. - Criminal Justice Alumni Day Panel Discussion. D132 Molinaro Hall.
    • Monday, April 15th -- Registration for Fall 2002 Classes
    • Wednesday, April 17th, 3:30-5:30 pm, Ellsworth Correctional Center Site Visit - filled
    • Friday, April 26th -- Exam 2
    • new Thursday, May 2nd, 9-11:30 a.m, Racine Correctional Institution Site Visit
    • Friday, May 3rd , beginning of class - 3rd grid form & ROL due
    • Friday, May 3rd, beginning of class - FINAL ABSOLUTE DEADLINE
    • May 6-10 -- Presentation of Creative Measures; Report of Debriefings; Theory, Policy, Practice Discussions
    • Friday, May 10th - Last Day of Class

    • Criminal Justice Association News

      Check the Criminal Justice Department web page for future club announcement.

    All UWP Classes, Spring 2002 Report of Learning (ROL)

    All UWP Classes, web assigned readings: All UWP Classes, site visits:

    • Wednesday, April 17th, 3:30-5:30 pm, Ellsworth Correctional Center Site Visit -- Filled.

    • new Thursday, May 2nd, 9-11:30 a.m, Racine Correctional Institution Site Visit -- If you are interested in attending, please email me. "First come, first serve" basis with a maximum of 30 students.

    Sociology of Law (SOCA 359)
    • Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 10 a.m. central time on the date noted)

      • Rule of Law/Surveillance (due Friday, April 5th) 1) Do you agree that there is widespread disenchantment with law? What current examples of this can you find? What examples of belief in law can you find? (from Bonsignore, p. 236, Q.1) 2) What are the sources of disenchantment or belief? Do the mass media tend in either direction in presenting legal issues? Why. (from Bonsignore, p. 236, Q.2) 3) What social institutions besides slavery can you think of where personal domination is supported by law? Does managerial control of employees fall into this category? teachers' control of students? parents' control of children? husbands' of wives? In each of these situations, what images of the relationship between dominant person(s) and the society does the law enforce? Why. (from Bonsignore, p. 246, Q.3). 4) Why did Chief Justice Warren say that the exclusionary rule is not very effective in regulating police actions in which arrest is not the police officer's aim? Why. (from Bonsignore, p. 278, Q.1). 5) ... Does this mean that the validity of police conduct is dependent on how articulate the officer is? Does this case provide a "script" for officers to use in describing their actions? Why. (from Bonsignore, p. 281, Q.2)

      • Lawyers (due Wednesday, April 10th). Note: In order to be prepared for this self-test, you need to view the documentary, "Ethics on Trial." Incorporate "Ethics on Trial" into your answers. . 1) Florynce Kennedy said, "[T]he law is a hustle..." (Bonsignore, p. 297). What did she mean by this? How would the four sociological perspectives explain/interpret this statement? Which interpretation do you agree with the most? Why? 2) Tocqueville states that lawyers "are less afraid of tyranny than of arbitrary power" and that they can turn despotism into "the external features of justice and law." What do these ideas imply in the context of a democratic society? (Bonsignore, p. 302, Q. 3). 3) Kennedy says that people generally accept the idea that hierarchies express the net value of each individual's worth, and thus they also accept not only other people's unequal relationship to themselves, but also their own location in unequal systems. Do you agree? Why? (Bonsignore, p. 336, Q.3). 4) Professor Williams, by taking up the student's cause, comes to suffer the same fate as the student -- ostracism and blaming the victim. What does this imply about law school culture, pedagogy, and hierarchies, and about advocacy? (Bonsignore, p. 343, Q. 2) 5) ... Should there be any limits to a lawyer's advocacy? Should society have any interest in the lawyer-client relationship so long as the lawyer is ethical? (Bonsignore, p. 350, Q. 3 -- You need to read this question in its entirety) 6) Curtis claims that lawyers must be understood as playing a game. Lawyers commonly refer to legal practice as a game. Why is that? Other professionals - doctors, ministers, engineers, social workers, scientists, academics - don't do it. . . (Bonsignore, p. 350, Q. 4. Read the last part of this question in your textbook).

      • Law Stories - First 3 (due Friday, April 12th). 1) What is structural violence? How does structural violence relate to "Welfare Stories?" Why. 2) How would the 4 sociological perspectives (SF, M, SI and HT) explain the story, "Maintaining the Status Quo"? Which theoretical explanation do you agree with the most? Why? 3) What is the tension between facts and norms in "We Are All We've Got"? How might the tension be resolved, according to Habermas? Why. 4) What does silence and silencing have to do with the first three stories in this book? Why.

      • new Juries (due Wednesday, April 17th). Note: Need to view the documentary, "Inside the Jury Room" in order to be prepared for this self-test. 1) The motto on the Supreme Court Building is "Equal Justice under Law." How does this relate to "Inside the Jury Room?" Why. 2) Would you agree with Marshall's conclusion that the only reliable way to eliminate racism in peremptory challenges is to eliminate the practice of peremptory challenges altogether? Why. (from Bonsignore, p. 447, Q. 2). 3) Do you think that persons who are opposed to capital punishment should be permitted to sit on a jury in a capital trial? ... Is it consistent with the role of the jury as an institutions designed to reflect community beliefs and conscience to have such persons excluded? (from Bonsignore, p. 447, Q.6). 4) Instead of a representative cross section of the community, should a jury of peers be defined as a jury made up of people sharing the cultural and economic background of the defendant? (from Bonsignore, p. 448, Q.11) 5) Can the jury system function adequately in a society that is so heterogeneous that there are a nearly infinite number of ways of categorizing differences among people? (from Bonsignore, p. 448, Q. 14). 6) ... Suppose the jury really is declining for all these reasons. How do the following quotes help you think about the consequences of and motives for this decline? [refer to the quotes in the textbook] (from Bonsignore, p. 471, Q.7)

      • new Law Stories 2nd 3 (due Friday, April 19th) 1) In Minow's "What's Wrong with these Pictures?...", what is the most important message that the author is trying to tell you? Why. What would a structural functionalist and a Marxist say is the message in this story? Why. 2) In Ogletree's "Public defender, public friend..." what is the most important message that the author is trying to tell you? Why. What would Howard Becker (a symbolic interactionist) and Jurgen Habermas say is the important message here? Why. 3) In Smith's "On representing a victim of crime," what is the tension between facts and norms? What might Habermas suggest to relieve the tension? Why.


    • Special Announcement
      --- Weds, April 10th, 11-11:50 a.m. - Criminal Justice Alumni Day Panel Discussion. D132 Molinaro Hall.
      --- Monday, April 15th -- Registration for Fall 2002 Classes
      --- Wednesday, April 17th, 3:30-5:30 pm, Ellsworth Correctional Center Site Visit - Filled
      --- Friday, April 26th -- Exam 2
      --- new Thursday, May 2nd, 9-11:30 a.m, Racine Correctional Institution Site Visit
      --- Friday, May 3rd , beginning of class - 3rd grid form & ROL due
      --- Friday, May 3rd, beginning of class - FINAL ABSOLUTE DEADLINE
      --- May 6-10 -- Presentation of Creative Measures; Report of Debriefings; Theory, Policy, Practice Discussions
      --- Friday, May 10th - Last Day of Class

    • Exam 2 Study Questions
      --- 1. Select one -- law enforcement, lawyers or juries, and explain the most pressing ethical dilemma within this particular aspect of the legal process. Utilizing the four sociological perspectives (structural functionalism, Marxism, symbolic interactionism and Habermasian theory), what solutions would each perspective propose? Why.
      --- 2. In an earlier edition, Bonsignore states: "Law is almost always involved with issues of self and other, and often involved with issues of life and death." What did he mean by this? How does this statement relate to Law Stories?Why.
      --- 3. Chief Justice Warren Burger stated: "Our system is too costly, too painful, too destructive, too inefficient for a truly civilized people." How does this statement relate to Law Stories? Why.
      --- 4. According to Donald Kingsbury, "Law is what is read, not what is written," (Bonsignore, p. 21). Apply this statement to one of the following -- law enforcement, lawyers, the jury or conflict resolution. Explain which of the four theoretical perspectives (structural functionalism, Marxism, symbolic interactionism or Habermasian theory) best fits this statement? Why.
      --- 5. "In some areas of law, the image of freedom is dominant; in others, the image of obedience is" (earlier edition of Bonsignore). How does this relate to Law Stories? Why. Which image of law do you agree with the most? Why.

    • Recommended Readings
      --- Barbara Perry. The "Supremes:"Essay on the Current Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States.
      --- Howard Bell. A Defiant Life: Thurgood Marshall and the Persistence of Racism in America.
      --- Joan Hewett. Public Defender: Lawyers for the People.
      --- Anne Strick. Injustice for All.
      --- Peter Brooks & Paul Gewirtz.. Law's Stories: Narratives and Rhetoric in the Law.
      --- Karen Morello. The Invisible Bar: The Woman Lawyer in America.
      --- Richard Abel. American Lawyers.
      --- Patricia Williams. The Alchemy of Race and Rights.

      --- Jurgen Habermas. Between Facts and Norms.
      --- Martha Minow. Making All the Difference: Exclusion, Inclusion and American Law. Check out this link Martha Minow on the Dear Habermas site.

    • Important Class Related Links
      --- "Who's Habermas? Why Habermas?"

    • Links to the Sociology of Law Handbook readings
      -- Introduction
      -- Chapter 1, part 1
      -- Chapter 1, part 2
      -- Chapter 2


    Corrections (CRMJ/SOCA 363)

    • Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 11 a.m. central time on the date noted)

      • Holes-Beginning (due Friday, April 5th) 1) How does the "institutionalization" of Stanley compare to that of Victor Hassine's experience? Why. 2) What are your early impressions of Holes?

      • Holes - Middle (due Friday, April 12th) 1) Compare and contrast the formal structure and informal structure of Camp Green Lake in terms of survival, and in terms of "inmate-guard" relations. 2) What is the purpose of digging holes from a correctional perspective? Why. 3) What role does race relations play in this book, so far? How does this compare to Hassine's observations? Why.

      • Special Populations (due Monday, April 15th) Note: In order to be prepared for this self-test, you need to view the documentary, "Voices From Inside" to be shown in class. What are some unique problems and challenges when dealing with the HIV-positive prisoner? the elderly prisoner? the female prisoner? the mentally ill prisoner? Why. 2) As a follow-up, what might be some solutions relating the the problems of the HIV-positive prisoner? the elderly prisoner? the female prisoner? the mentally ill prisoner? Why.

      • new Holes-End/Juvenile Corrections (due Wednesday, April 24th). 1) What are the basic differences between the juvenile justice system and the adult criminal justice system? Why. 2) Compare and contrast some of the major problems in today's juvenile correctional institutions with Holes. 3) After completing Holes , what does this book tell us about juvenile corrections? Why. 4) What is the future direction of juvenile corrections? Do you agree or disagree with this direction? Why.


    • Exam 2 Study Questions
      --- 1. Compare and contrast jails and prisons. And then, compare and contrast probation and parole. Discuss one of these aspects of corrections as it relates to "theory, policy, practice."
      --- 2. Compare and contrast the correctional experience of Hassine in Life Without Parole with that of Stanley in Holes. What can we learn from both experiences as they relate to "theory, policy, practice?" Why.
      --- 3. What is the most serious problem in corrections today? Why. How does this selected problem and its solutions relate to "theory, policy, and practice?" Why. Be sure to incorporate the readings into your essay.
      --- 4. Charles Logan notes: "We ask them to correct the incorrigible, rehabilitate the wretched, deter the determined, restrain the dangerous and punish the wicked." What does Logan mean? How does this compare to Hassine's assessment of corrections? And, finally, how does this relate to "theory, policy, and practice"? Why.
      --- 5. Based on the readings and other materials introduced in this course, what is the future of correctional "theories, policies and practices?" Why.

    • Special Announcement
      --- Tuesday, April 9th, 7 p.m. -- Site Visit of Downtown Kenosha County Jail with Janetta Sepanski. Email me if you are interested in attending this site visit.
      --- Weds, April 10th, 11-11:50 a.m. - Criminal Justice Alumni Day Panel Discussion. D132 Molinaro Hall.
      --- Monday, April 15th -- Registration for Fall 2002 Classes
      --- Wednesday, April 17th, 3:30-5:30 pm, Ellsworth Correctional Center Site Visit - Filled
      --- Friday, April 26th -- Exam 2
      --- new Thursday, May 2nd, 9-11:30 a.m, Racine Correctional Institution Site Visit. Email me if you are interested in attending.
      --- Friday, May 3rd , beginning of class - 3rd grid form & ROL due
      --- Friday, May 3rd, beginning of class - FINAL ABSOLUTE DEADLINE
      --- May 6-10 -- Presentation of Creative Measures; Report of Debriefings; Theory, Policy, Practice Discussions
      --- Friday, May 10th - Last Day of Class

    • Recommended Readings
      --- Paul Beatty. The White Boy Shuffle.
      --- Christopher Curtis. Bud, Not Buddy.
      --- J.K. Rowling. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone.

    • Interesting Links

      Annotations on Louis Sachar's Holes

      The Problem with Incarcerating Mothers

      Maricopa County Sheriff's Office Jail Cam Link. Link found by Mary Frances Chachula.

      Wisconsin Department of Corrections

      Virtual Prison Tour


    Law and Social Change (CRMJ/SOCA 352)

    • Revised Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 1 p.m. central time on the date noted)

      • Chaos Theory/Color Yellow pt. 1 (due Friday, April 12th). Note: In order to be prepared for this self-test, you must view the documentaries, "Slaying the Dragon," and "Harsh Canvas," to be shown in class. 1) What are the essential principles of chaos theory as presented in this chapter? (Arrigo, p. 199, Q.3). 2) How can police practice, judicial procedures, and probation work advance the tenets of chaos theory? (Arrigo, p. 199, Q.6). 3) How does chaos theory relate to the Color Yellow (M&Z, chapters 14 & 15)? Provide examples to better illustrate your point. 4) Relate chaos theory to the documentaries, "Slaying the Dragon," and "Harsh Canvas." 5) Discuss W.I. Thomas' notion that "if men define their situation as real, then they are real in their consequences." Then examine the implications of this notion for public policy using a contemporary example from the Asian American experience. (M&Z, p. 178, Q.3) 6) What movies and television shows can you think of that portray Asians in nonstereotypical ways? (M&Z, p. 187, Q.3)

      • new Queer Theory/Color Yellow pt. 2 (due Friday, April 19th) Note: Need to view the documentary, "Understanding Hate Crimes," in order to be prepared for this exercise. 1) What are some ways that sexuality is regulated by our society? (Arrigo, p. 249, Q. 1). 2) How is social inequality linked to AIDS? (Arrigo, p. 249, Q.3) 3) 3) Discuss the reasons for the lack of participation in civic and political life by many Asian Americans. (Mann & Zatz, p. 194, Q.2). 4) A typical "bad" stereotype in American culture refers to Asians as sinister villains and brute hordes bent on sheer destructiveness. Why do crime statistics not reflect those images? What are the contributing factors in stereotyping Asians in American society? (Mann & Zatz, p. 204, Q.1). 5) Why has the criminal justice system responded so poorly to crimes against Asian Americans? (Mann & Zatz, p. 204, Q. 5). Relate your answer to "Understanding Hate Crimes."



    • Special Announcements
      --- Weds, April 10th, 11-11:50 a.m. - Criminal Justice Alumni Day Panel Discussion. D132 Molinaro Hall.
      --- Monday, April 15th -- Registration for Fall 2002 Classes
      --- Wednesday, April 17th, 3:30-5:30 pm, Ellsworth Correctional Center Site Visit - Filled.
      --- Friday, April 26th -- Exam 2
      --- new Thursday, May 2nd, 9-11:30 a.m, Racine Correctional Institution Site Visit
      --- Friday, May 3rd , beginning of class - 3rd grid form & ROL due
      --- Friday, May 3rd, beginning of class - FINAL ABSOLUTE DEADLINE
      --- May 6-10 -- Presentation of Creative Measures; Report of Debriefings; Theory, Policy, Practice Discussions
      --- Friday, May 10th - Last Day of Class

    • Exam 2 Study Questions
      --- 1. new After reading about the Colors Red, Black, Brown and Yellow, and the Invisible Color White, which Arrigo theory best fit for each group? Select a different theory for each group. (Do not use the same theory twice).Why. Provide examples from the readings to strengthen your argument.
      --- 2. Based on the theories introduced in Arrigo's book, what do you think the relationship between criminal justice and social justice should be? Why. Which theory comes closest to your viewpoint on this relationship? Why. Incorporate the Mann and Zatz book into your argument.
      --- 3. From Mann and Zatz, do you share their cautious optimism about the diminution of institutional racism beyond the millennium? Why. Incorporate the Arrigo readings into your answer.
      --- 4. new Relating to Images of Color/Images of Crime , which two Arrigo theories makes the least sense to you? Why. And finally, which three theoretical perspectives from the Arrigo book makes the most sense to you? Why.
      --- 5. If you could change something within the criminal justice apparatus so that the system was more consistent with critical social justice principles, what would it be? Why. Incorporate both books into your essay.

    • Links to Lecture Notes and Other Things
      --- new Poem by Michael Witkofski.
      --- new Poem by Adela Lozano.

    • Other Recommended Readings
      --- Herbert Schiller. The Mind Managers.
      --- Gaye Tuchman. The TV Establishment.
      --- Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston. Farewell to Manzanar.
      --- Michi Weglyn. Years of Infamy.
      --- Lawson Fusao Inada. Only What We Could Carry: The Japanese American Internment Experience.
      --- Greg Robinson. By Order of the President: FDR and the Internment of Japanese Americans.
      --- Victor Nee. Longtime Californ'.
      --- H. Kim. A Legal History of Asian Americans, 1790-1990 .

      --- Jurgen Habermas. Between Facts and Norms.
      --- Martha Minow. Making All the Difference: Exclusion, Inclusion and American Law. Check out this link Martha Minow on the Dear Habermas site.

    • Links to the Sociology of Law Handbook readings

      -- Introduction
      -- Chapter 1, part 1
      -- Chapter 1, part 2
      -- Chapter 2


      All UWP Classes, Fall 2001 Report of Learning (ROL)