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Susan Takata

Classes:
Sociology of Law
Corrections
Law and Social Change
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Main Hub Sites:
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Prof. Takata.
Department of Criminal Justice
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Latest Update: April 11, 2002

UWP Local Hub Site
Dear Habermas


    NEWSFLASH

    Ellsworth Correctional Site Visit - Wednesday, April 17th at 3:30 p.m.


  • This local hub site will serve as a forum for messages about:
    All UWP Classes, Announcements
    • Monday, April 15th -- Registration for Fall 2002 Classes
    • Wednesday, April 17th, 3:30-5:30 pm, Ellsworth Correctional Center Site Visit - filled
    • new Tuesday, April 23rd, 10 a.m-12 noon, Racine County Jail Site Visit - filled
    • Friday, April 26th -- Exam 2
    • Thursday, May 2nd, 9-11:30 a.m, Racine Correctional Institution Site Visit - filled
    • Friday, May 3rd , beginning of class - 3rd grid form & ROL due
    • Friday, May 3rd, beginning of class - FINAL ABSOLUTE DEADLINE
    • May 6-10 -- Presentation of Creative Measures; Report of Debriefings; Theory, Policy, Practice Discussions
    • Friday, May 10th - Last Day of Class

    • Criminal Justice Association News

      Check the Criminal Justice Department web page for future club announcement.

    All UWP Classes, Spring 2002 Report of Learning (ROL)

    • Keep in mind:

      ** the 5Cs: competency, consistency, cooperation, communication, and creativity.

      ** Bloom and Krathwohl's Taxonomy of Learning: latent learning, recognition, recall, application, analysis, evaluation, and synthesis.

    • Reports of Learning (ROL) must be interactive and interdependent. You are responsible for telling me what you have accomplished, verifying it with your journal, and then emailing me a brief ROL. A ROL must be interactive to be effective. By writing your own ROL and negotiating it with me, means that you must assume responsibility for your learning by giving me detailed evidence of your learning. Link to UWP Grade Form and for an explanation of the grade form link to Choosing Measures for Grading and Measures of Learning

      new As mentioned in class last week, here is a student's rephrasing of How to get an A: "Gathering information to get an "A" on a project means going that extra mile to research, study, and apply what you've learned in class. Rather than just turning in a project, one could keep the instructor abreast on how the project was going and maybe ask for some added input. The instructor would then be aware of the efforts and progress a student is making with the project and the learning (he or she) is attaining. "

    • Sociology of Law Spring 2002 Report of Learning Page

    • Corrections Spring 2002 Report of Learning Page

    • Law and Social Change Spring 2002 Report of Learning Page


    All UWP Classes, web assigned readings: All UWP Classes, site visits:

      new DON'T BE A "NO SHOW"! If you cannot attend, email me ASAP so that another student can attend the site visit.

    • Wednesday, April 17th, 3:30-5:30 pm, Ellsworth Correctional Center Site Visit -- Filled.

    • new Tuesday, April 23rd, 10 am-12noon, Racine County Jail Site Visit -- Filled .

    • Thursday, May 2nd, 9-11:30 a.m, Racine Correctional Institution Site Visit -- Filled .

    Sociology of Law (SOCA 359)
    • Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 10 a.m. central time on the date noted)

      • Law Stories - First 3 (due Friday, April 12th). 1) What is structural violence? How does structural violence relate to "Welfare Stories?" Why. 2) How would the 4 sociological perspectives (SF, M, SI and HT) explain the story, "Maintaining the Status Quo"? Which theoretical explanation do you agree with the most? Why? 3) What is the tension between facts and norms in "We Are All We've Got"? How might the tension be resolved, according to Habermas? Why. 4) What does silence and silencing have to do with the first three stories in this book? Why.

      • Juries (due Wednesday, April 17th). Note: Need to view the documentary, "Inside the Jury Room" in order to be prepared for this self-test. 1) The motto on the Supreme Court Building is "Equal Justice under Law." How does this relate to "Inside the Jury Room?" Why. 2) Would you agree with Marshall's conclusion that the only reliable way to eliminate racism in peremptory challenges is to eliminate the practice of peremptory challenges altogether? Why. (from Bonsignore, p. 447, Q. 2). 3) Do you think that persons who are opposed to capital punishment should be permitted to sit on a jury in a capital trial? ... Is it consistent with the role of the jury as an institutions designed to reflect community beliefs and conscience to have such persons excluded? (from Bonsignore, p. 447, Q.6). 4) Instead of a representative cross section of the community, should a jury of peers be defined as a jury made up of people sharing the cultural and economic background of the defendant? (from Bonsignore, p. 448, Q.11) 5) Can the jury system function adequately in a society that is so heterogeneous that there are a nearly infinite number of ways of categorizing differences among people? (from Bonsignore, p. 448, Q. 14). 6) ... Suppose the jury really is declining for all these reasons. How do the following quotes help you think about the consequences of and motives for this decline? [refer to the quotes in the textbook] (from Bonsignore, p. 471, Q.7)

      • Law Stories 2nd 3 (due Friday, April 19th) 1) In Minow's "What's Wrong with these Pictures?...", what is the most important message that the author is trying to tell you? Why. What would a structural functionalist and a Marxist say is the message in this story? Why. 2) In Ogletree's "Public defender, public friend..." what is the most important message that the author is trying to tell you? Why. What would Howard Becker (a symbolic interactionist) and Jurgen Habermas say is the important message here? Why. 3) In Smith's "On representing a victim of crime," what is the tension between facts and norms? What might Habermas suggest to relieve the tension? Why.

      • new Conflict Resolution (due Wednesday, April 24th). 1) Why might mediation programs seem to have trouble attracting users? Is size of caseload an indicator of success? What other factors should be considered in evaluating the success or failure of mediation programs? (from Bonsignore, p. 516, Q.2). 2) Do you think it is important that people feel satisfied at the end of a case? (from Bonsignore, p. 516, Q.3). 3) What are the differences between the way that Navajos use mediation and the way it is used in the formal American legal system? (from Bonsignore, p. 521, Q.1). 4) Is victim-offender mediation appropriate for all criminal cases? Does its appropriateness depend on the seriousness of the crime? On the willingness of the parties to participate in this kind of mediation? Are there any dangers involved in this approach? (from Bonsignore, p. 530, Q.1). 5) Is restorative justice a legitimate goal of our justice system? Is it obtainable? (from Bonsignore, p. 530. Q.3).

    • Special Announcement
      --- Monday, April 15th -- Registration for Fall 2002 Classes
      --- Wednesday, April 17th, 3:30-5:30 pm, Ellsworth Correctional Center Site Visit - Filled
      --- Friday, April 26th -- Exam 2
      --- new Tuesday, April 23rd, 10am-12 noon, Racine County Jail Site Visit - Filled
      -- Thursday, May 2nd, 9-11:30 a.m, Racine Correctional Institution Site Visit - Filled
      --- Friday, May 3rd , beginning of class - 3rd grid form & ROL due
      --- Friday, May 3rd, beginning of class - FINAL ABSOLUTE DEADLINE
      --- May 6-10 -- Presentation of Creative Measures; Report of Debriefings; Theory, Policy, Practice Discussions
      --- Friday, May 10th - Last Day of Class

    • Exam 2 Study Questions
      --- 1. Select one -- law enforcement, lawyers or juries, and explain the most pressing ethical dilemma within this particular aspect of the legal process. Utilizing the four sociological perspectives (structural functionalism, Marxism, symbolic interactionism and Habermasian theory), what solutions would each perspective propose? Why.
      --- 2. In an earlier edition, Bonsignore states: "Law is almost always involved with issues of self and other, and often involved with issues of life and death." What did he mean by this? How does this statement relate to Law Stories?Why.
      --- 3. Chief Justice Warren Burger stated: "Our system is too costly, too painful, too destructive, too inefficient for a truly civilized people." How does this statement relate to Law Stories? Why.
      --- 4. According to Donald Kingsbury, "Law is what is read, not what is written," (Bonsignore, p. 21). Apply this statement to one of the following -- law enforcement, lawyers, the jury or conflict resolution. Explain which of the four theoretical perspectives (structural functionalism, Marxism, symbolic interactionism or Habermasian theory) best fits this statement? Why.
      --- 5. "In some areas of law, the image of freedom is dominant; in others, the image of obedience is" (earlier edition of Bonsignore). How does this relate to Law Stories? Why. Which image of law do you agree with the most? Why.

    • Recommended Readings
      --- Jeffrey Abrahamson. We, The Jury: The Jury System and the Ideal of Democracy.
      --- Derrick Bell. Race, Racism and American Law.
      --- Harry Kalven and Hans Zeisel. The American Jury.
      --- Leonard Levy. The Palladium of Justice: Origins of Trial by Jury.

      --- Jurgen Habermas. Between Facts and Norms.
      --- Martha Minow. Making All the Difference: Exclusion, Inclusion and American Law. Check out this link Martha Minow on the Dear Habermas site.

    • Important Class Related Links
      --- "Who's Habermas? Why Habermas?"

    • Links to the Sociology of Law Handbook readings
      -- Introduction
      -- Chapter 1, part 1
      -- Chapter 1, part 2
      -- Chapter 2


    Corrections (CRMJ/SOCA 363)

    • Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 11 a.m. central time on the date noted)

      • Holes - Middle (due Friday, April 12th) 1) Compare and contrast the formal structure and informal structure of Camp Green Lake in terms of survival, and in terms of "inmate-guard" relations. 2) What is the purpose of digging holes from a correctional perspective? Why. 3) What role does race relations play in this book, so far? How does this compare to Hassine's observations? Why.

      • Special Populations (due Monday, April 15th) Note: In order to be prepared for this self-test, you need to view the documentary, "Voices From Inside" to be shown in class. What are some unique problems and challenges when dealing with the HIV-positive prisoner? the elderly prisoner? the female prisoner? the mentally ill prisoner? Why. 2) As a follow-up, what might be some solutions relating the the problems of the HIV-positive prisoner? the elderly prisoner? the female prisoner? the mentally ill prisoner? Why.

      • Holes-End/Juvenile Corrections (due Wednesday, April 24th). 1) What are the basic differences between the juvenile justice system and the adult criminal justice system? Why. 2) Compare and contrast some of the major problems in today's juvenile correctional institutions with Holes. 3) After completing Holes , what does this book tell us about juvenile corrections? Why. 4) What is the future direction of juvenile corrections? Do you agree or disagree with this direction? Why.


    • Exam 2 Study Questions
      --- 1. Compare and contrast jails and prisons. And then, compare and contrast probation and parole. Discuss one of these aspects of corrections as it relates to "theory, policy, practice."
      --- 2. Compare and contrast the correctional experience of Hassine in Life Without Parole with that of Stanley in Holes. What can we learn from both experiences as they relate to "theory, policy, practice?" Why.
      --- 3. What is the most serious problem in corrections today? Why. How does this selected problem and its solutions relate to "theory, policy, and practice?" Why. Be sure to incorporate the readings into your essay.
      --- 4. Charles Logan notes: "We ask them to correct the incorrigible, rehabilitate the wretched, deter the determined, restrain the dangerous and punish the wicked." What does Logan mean? How does this compare to Hassine's assessment of corrections? And, finally, how does this relate to "theory, policy, and practice"? Why.
      --- 5. Based on the readings and other materials introduced in this course, what is the future of correctional "theories, policies and practices?" Why.

    • Special Announcement
      --- Monday, April 15th -- Registration for Fall 2002 Classes
      --- Wednesday, April 17th, 3:30-5:30 pm, Ellsworth Correctional Center Site Visit - Filled
      --- new Tuesday, April 23rd, 10am-12 noon, Racine County Jail Site Visit - Filled
      --- Friday, April 26th -- Exam 2
      --- Thursday, May 2nd, 9-11:30 a.m, Racine Correctional Institution Site Visit - Filled.
      --- Friday, May 3rd , beginning of class - 3rd grid form & ROL due
      --- Friday, May 3rd, beginning of class - FINAL ABSOLUTE DEADLINE
      --- May 6-10 -- Presentation of Creative Measures; Report of Debriefings; Theory, Policy, Practice Discussions
      --- Friday, May 10th - Last Day of Class

    • Recommended Readings
      --- new Kathleen O'Shea. Women on the Row: Revelations from Both Sides of the Bars.
      --- new Sandy Cook & Susanne Davies. Harsh Punishment: International Experiences of Women's Imprisonment.
      --- new Lori Girschick. No Safe Haven: Stories of Women in Prison.
      --- new Sandra Enos. Mothering from the Inside: Parenting in a Women's Prison

    • Interesting Links

      Annotations on Louis Sachar's Holes

      The Problem with Incarcerating Mothers

      Maricopa County Sheriff's Office Jail Cam Link. Link found by Mary Frances Chachula.

      Wisconsin Department of Corrections

      Virtual Prison Tour


    Law and Social Change (CRMJ/SOCA 352)

    • Revised Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 1 p.m. central time on the date noted)

      • Chaos Theory/Color Yellow pt. 1 (due Friday, April 12th). Note: In order to be prepared for this self-test, you must view the documentaries, "Slaying the Dragon," and "Harsh Canvas," to be shown in class. 1) What are the essential principles of chaos theory as presented in this chapter? (Arrigo, p. 199, Q.3). 2) How can police practice, judicial procedures, and probation work advance the tenets of chaos theory? (Arrigo, p. 199, Q.6). 3) How does chaos theory relate to the Color Yellow (M&Z, chapters 14 & 15)? Provide examples to better illustrate your point. 4) Relate chaos theory to the documentaries, "Slaying the Dragon," and "Harsh Canvas." 5) Discuss W.I. Thomas' notion that "if men define their situation as real, then they are real in their consequences." Then examine the implications of this notion for public policy using a contemporary example from the Asian American experience. (M&Z, p. 178, Q.3) 6) What movies and television shows can you think of that portray Asians in nonstereotypical ways? (M&Z, p. 187, Q.3)

      • Queer Theory/Color Yellow pt. 2 (due Friday, April 19th) Note: Need to view the documentary, "Understanding Hate Crimes," in order to be prepared for this exercise. 1) What are some ways that sexuality is regulated by our society? (Arrigo, p. 249, Q. 1). 2) How is social inequality linked to AIDS? (Arrigo, p. 249, Q.3) 3) 3) Discuss the reasons for the lack of participation in civic and political life by many Asian Americans. (Mann & Zatz, p. 194, Q.2). 4) A typical "bad" stereotype in American culture refers to Asians as sinister villains and brute hordes bent on sheer destructiveness. Why do crime statistics not reflect those images? What are the contributing factors in stereotyping Asians in American society? (Mann & Zatz, p. 204, Q.1). 5) Why has the criminal justice system responded so poorly to crimes against Asian Americans? (Mann & Zatz, p. 204, Q. 5). Relate your answer to "Understanding Hate Crimes."

      • new Postmodern Feminism/Invisible Color White (due Wednesday, April 24th). 1) How do feminism and postmodernism differ from one another? (from Arrigo, p. 126, Q.1). 2) Why is equality a problematic concept for feminist and postmodern scholars, and how do they propose to alter the law to address these problems? (Arrigo, p. 126, Q.8). 3) What are some of the consequences of the media's treatment of whiteness and crime? How do the media contribute to the perpetuation of racial inequality in the United States? (M&Z, p. 232, Q.5). 4) What is the "rhetorical wink?" How does the author use this figure of speech? (M&Z, p. 243, Q.1). 5) According to the author, why does the Supermax prison provide the best metaphor for moral bankruptcy about crime and corrections? Who is the typical inmate in Supermax prisons? (M&Z, p. 2443, Q.3). 6) Are there social bandits today? (M&Z, p. 256, Q.5).



    • Special Announcements
      --- Monday, April 15th -- Registration for Fall 2002 Classes
      --- Wednesday, April 17th, 3:30-5:30 pm, Ellsworth Correctional Center Site Visit - Filled.
      --- new Tuesday, April 23rd, 10am-12 noon, Racine County Jail Site Visit - Filled
      --- Friday, April 26th -- Exam 2
      --- Thursday, May 2nd, 9-11:30 a.m, Racine Correctional Institution Site Visit -- Filled
      --- Friday, May 3rd , beginning of class - 3rd grid form & ROL due
      --- Friday, May 3rd, beginning of class - FINAL ABSOLUTE DEADLINE
      --- May 6-10 -- Presentation of Creative Measures; Report of Debriefings; Theory, Policy, Practice Discussions
      --- Friday, May 10th - Last Day of Class

    • Exam 2 Study Questions
      --- 1. After reading about the Colors Red, Black, Brown and Yellow, and the Invisible Color White, which Arrigo theory best fit for each group? Select a different theory for each group. (Do not use the same theory twice).Why. Provide examples from the readings to strengthen your argument.
      --- 2. Based on the theories introduced in Arrigo's book, what do you think the relationship between criminal justice and social justice should be? Why. Which theory comes closest to your viewpoint on this relationship? Why. Incorporate the Mann and Zatz book into your argument.
      --- 3. From Mann and Zatz, do you share their cautious optimism about the diminution of institutional racism beyond the millennium? Why. Incorporate the Arrigo readings into your answer.
      --- 4. Relating to Images of Color/Images of Crime , which two Arrigo theories makes the least sense to you? Why. And finally, which three theoretical perspectives from the Arrigo book makes the most sense to you? Why.
      --- 5. If you could change something within the criminal justice apparatus so that the system was more consistent with critical social justice principles, what would it be? Why. Incorporate both books into your essay.

    • Links to Lecture Notes and Other Things
      --- new They Ain't Us: Identity as an Anti-Norm.
      --- new Japanese American National Museum.
      --- new Exploring Japanese American Internment Through Film and the Internet.
      --- Poem by Michael Witkofski.
      --- Poem by Adela Lozano.

    • Other Recommended Readings
      --- new Claire Alexander. The Asian Gang: Ethnicity, Identity, Masculinity.
      --- Herbert Schiller. The Mind Managers.
      --- Gaye Tuchman. The TV Establishment.
      --- Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston. Farewell to Manzanar.
      --- Michi Weglyn. Years of Infamy.
      --- Lawson Fusao Inada. Only What We Could Carry: The Japanese American Internment Experience.
      --- Greg Robinson. By Order of the President: FDR and the Internment of Japanese Americans.
      --- Victor Nee. Longtime Californ'.
      --- H. Kim. A Legal History of Asian Americans, 1790-1990 .

      --- Jurgen Habermas. Between Facts and Norms.
      --- Martha Minow. Making All the Difference: Exclusion, Inclusion and American Law. Check out this link Martha Minow on the Dear Habermas site.

    • Links to the Sociology of Law Handbook readings

      -- Introduction
      -- Chapter 1, part 1
      -- Chapter 1, part 2
      -- Chapter 2


      All UWP Classes, Fall 2001 Report of Learning (ROL)