Link to the UWP Birdie Calendar Susan Takata's Hub Page

Dear Habermas Logo and Link to Site Index A Justice Site



Susan Takata

Classes:
Sociology of Law
Corrections
Law and Social Change
HOME


Main Hub Sites:
Habermas Site - CSUDH Site - UWP Site

Prof. Takata.
Department of Criminal Justice
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Latest Update: April 25, 2002

UWP Local Hub Site
Dear Habermas


    NEWSFLASH

    Racine Correctional Institution Site Visit - Thursday, May 2nd, 9 a.m.


    3rd ROL & grid form due/Absolute Final Deadline--Friday, May 3rd, beginning of class



  • This local hub site will serve as a forum for messages about:
    All UWP Classes, Announcements
    • new Monday, April 29th - Last Day to Submit Printed Copies of Debriefing, Web site reviews, Book reviews, etc. to allow time for email dialoguing.
    • new Thursday, May 2nd, 12 noon -- Deadline to email me and to guarantee a response (unless my PC crashes or the server goes down!). Emails sent after 12 noon cannot be guaranteed a response from me.
    • Thursday, May 2nd, 9-11:30 a.m, Racine Correctional Institution Site Visit - filled
    • Friday, May 3rd , beginning of class - 3rd grid form & ROL due
    • Friday, May 3rd, beginning of class - FINAL ABSOLUTE DEADLINE
    • May 6-10 -- Presentation of Creative Measures; Report of Debriefings; Theory, Policy, Practice Discussions
    • Friday, May 10th - Last Day of Class

    • Criminal Justice Association News

      Check the Criminal Justice Department web page for future club announcement.

    All UWP Classes, Spring 2002 Report of Learning (ROL)

    • Keep in mind:

      ** the 5Cs: competency, consistency, cooperation, communication, and creativity.

      ** Bloom and Krathwohl's Taxonomy of Learning: latent learning, recognition, recall, application, analysis, evaluation, and synthesis.

    • Reports of Learning (ROL) must be interactive and interdependent. You are responsible for telling me what you have accomplished, verifying it with your journal, and then emailing me a brief ROL. A ROL must be interactive to be effective. By writing your own ROL and negotiating it with me, means that you must assume responsibility for your learning by giving me detailed evidence of your learning. Link to UWP Grade Form and for an explanation of the grade form link to Choosing Measures for Grading and Measures of Learning

      As mentioned in class, here is a student's rephrasing of How to get an A: "Gathering information to get an "A" on a project means going that extra mile to research, study, and apply what you've learned in class. Rather than just turning in a project, one could keep the instructor abreast on how the project was going and maybe ask for some added input. The instructor would then be aware of the efforts and progress a student is making with the project and the learning (he or she) is attaining. "

    • Sociology of Law Spring 2002 Report of Learning Page

    • Corrections Spring 2002 Report of Learning Page

    • Law and Social Change Spring 2002 Report of Learning Page


    All UWP Classes -- Forms, web assigned readings: All UWP Classes, site visits:

      DON'T BE A "NO SHOW"! If you cannot attend, email me ASAP so that another student can attend the site visit.

    • Thursday, May 2nd, 9-11:30 a.m, Racine Correctional Institution Site Visit -- Filled .

    Sociology of Law (SOCA 359)
    • Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 10 a.m. central time on the date noted)

      • Cyberspace and the Law (due Monday, April 29th) 1) David Bolter states: "Each technology gives us a different space," (Bonsignore,p. 539). How would the four sociological perspectives (structural functionalism, Marxism, symbolic interactionism, and Habermasian theory) interpret this statement? Why. Which perspective do you agree with the most? Why. 2) "Cyberspace may be a vibrant place, a creative place, a fun place, even a lucrative place. It is not, however, a harmonious place," (Bonsignore, p, 555). What does this statement mean? What would Habermas' reaction be? Why. 3) Law and Cyberspace and Law in Cyberspace -- what would the 4 sociological theories say about this subject? Why. Which perspective do you "disagree" with the most? Why.

      • Law Stories - Last 2 + Afterword (due Wednesday, May 1st) 1) In Weaver's "Daily Log of Independent Fieldwork," why did the editors include this law story? What was the main point of this story? Why. 2) In White's "On the vision and practice of participation in Project Head Start," which of the four sociological theories best fits this story? Why. Which theory least applies? Why. 3) After reading Law Stories, what is your conclusion about the law? Why?

      • new ...


    • Special Announcement
      --- new Monday, April 29th - Last Day to Submit Printed Copies of Debriefing, Web site reviews, Book reviews, etc. to allow time for email dialoguing.
      --- Thursday, May 2nd, 9-11:30 a.m, Racine Correctional Institution Site Visit -- Filled
      --- new Thursday, May 2nd, 12 noon -- Deadline to email me and to guarantee a response (unless my PC crashes or the server goes down!). Emails sent after 12 noon cannot be guaranteed a response from me.
      --- Friday, May 3rd , beginning of class - 3rd grid form & ROL due
      --- Friday, May 3rd, beginning of class - FINAL ABSOLUTE DEADLINE
      --- May 6-10 -- Presentation of Creative Measures; Report of Debriefings; Theory, Policy, Practice Discussions
      --- Friday, May 10th - Last Day of Class

    • Exam 2 Study Questions
      --- 1. Select one -- law enforcement, lawyers or juries, and explain the most pressing ethical dilemma within this particular aspect of the legal process. Utilizing the four sociological perspectives (structural functionalism, Marxism, symbolic interactionism and Habermasian theory), what solutions would each perspective propose? Why.
      --- 2. In an earlier edition, Bonsignore states: "Law is almost always involved with issues of self and other, and often involved with issues of life and death." What did he mean by this? How does this statement relate to Law Stories?Why.
      --- 3. Chief Justice Warren Burger stated: "Our system is too costly, too painful, too destructive, too inefficient for a truly civilized people." How does this statement relate to Law Stories? Why.
      --- 4. According to Donald Kingsbury, "Law is what is read, not what is written," (Bonsignore, p. 21). Apply this statement to one of the following -- law enforcement, lawyers, the jury or conflict resolution. Explain which of the four theoretical perspectives (structural functionalism, Marxism, symbolic interactionism or Habermasian theory) best fits this statement? Why.
      --- 5. "In some areas of law, the image of freedom is dominant; in others, the image of obedience is" (earlier edition of Bonsignore). How does this relate to Law Stories? Why. Which image of law do you agree with the most? Why.

    • Recommended Readings
      --- Jurgen Habermas. Between Facts and Norms.
      --- Martha Minow. Making All the Difference: Exclusion, Inclusion and American Law. Check out this link Martha Minow on the Dear Habermas site.

    • Important Class Related Links
      --- "Who's Habermas? Why Habermas?"

    • Links to the Sociology of Law Handbook readings
      -- Introduction
      -- Chapter 1, part 1
      -- Chapter 1, part 2
      -- Chapter 2


    Corrections (CRMJ/SOCA 363)

    • Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 11 a.m. central time on the date noted)

      • Future of Corrections (due Wednesday, May 1st) 1) In comparing theory and policy (Haas & Alpert) with practice (Hassine and Sachar), what are the points of departure? Where do ideas merge? Why. 2) How do you think offenders will be punished/corrected in the future? Why. 3) In the future, what should be the dominant goal in corrections? Why. 4) What recommendations would you make with regard to the way career criminals are handled? Why. Provide examples from the readings.

      • new ...


    • Exam 2 Study Questions
      --- 1. Compare and contrast jails and prisons. And then, compare and contrast probation and parole. Discuss one of these aspects of corrections as it relates to "theory, policy, practice."
      --- 2. Compare and contrast the correctional experience of Hassine in Life Without Parole with that of Stanley in Holes. What can we learn from both experiences as they relate to "theory, policy, practice?" Why.
      --- 3. What is the most serious problem in corrections today? Why. How does this selected problem and its solutions relate to "theory, policy, and practice?" Why. Be sure to incorporate the readings into your essay.
      --- 4. Charles Logan notes: "We ask them to correct the incorrigible, rehabilitate the wretched, deter the determined, restrain the dangerous and punish the wicked." What does Logan mean? How does this compare to Hassine's assessment of corrections? And, finally, how does this relate to "theory, policy, and practice"? Why.
      --- 5. Based on the readings and other materials introduced in this course, what is the future of correctional "theories, policies and practices?" Why.

    • Special Announcement
      --- new Monday, April 29th - Last Day to Submit Printed Copies of Debriefing, Web site reviews, Book reviews, etc. to allow time for email dialoguing.
      --- Thursday, May 2nd, 9-11:30 a.m, Racine Correctional Institution Site Visit -- Filled
      --- new Thursday, May 2nd, 12 noon -- Deadline to email me and to guarantee a response (unless my PC crashes or the server goes down!). Emails sent after 12 noon cannot be guaranteed a response from me.
      --- Friday, May 3rd , beginning of class - 3rd grid form & ROL due
      --- Friday, May 3rd, beginning of class - FINAL ABSOLUTE DEADLINE
      --- May 6-10 -- Presentation of Creative Measures; Report of Debriefings; Theory, Policy, Practice Discussions
      --- Friday, May 10th - Last Day of Class

    • Recommended Readings
      --- John Irwin and James Austin. It's About Time: The Imprisonment Binge.
      --- Jeffrey Reiman. The Rich Get Richer and the Poor Get Prison.

    • Interesting Links

      Juvenile Corrections

      Annotations on Louis Sachar's Holes

      Maricopa County Sheriff's Office Jail Cam Link. Link found by Mary Frances Chachula.

      Wisconsin Department of Corrections

      Virtual Prison Tour


    Law and Social Change (CRMJ/SOCA 352)

    • Revised Course Syllabus

    • Self-Tests/Pass-Prepared Exercises (all exercises are due no later than 1 p.m. central time on the date noted)

      • Law, Social Change and the Future (due Wednesday, May 1st) 1) Why do juvenile and criminal justice programs need to be sensitive to cultural and gender differences in the populations they serve? Specify what programs should be different. Why? (from M&Z, p. 270, Q.1). 2) Do you share our [Mann & Zatz] cautious optimism about the diminution of institutional racism beyond the millennium? (from M&Z, p. 270, Q.5). 3) What are the basic differences between critical social justice and criminal justice practices? (Arrigo, p. 271, Q. 6). 4) If you could change something within the criminal justice apparatus so that the system was more consistent with critical social justice principles, what would it be? Why. (Arrigo, p. 271, Q.7).

      • new ...


    • Special Announcements
      --- new Monday, April 29th - Last Day to Submit Printed Copies of Debriefing, Web site reviews, Book reviews, etc. to allow time for email dialoguing.
      --- Thursday, May 2nd, 9-11:30 a.m, Racine Correctional Institution Site Visit -- Filled
      --- new Thursday, May 2nd, 12 noon -- Deadline to email me and to guarantee a response (unless my PC crashes or the server goes down!). Emails sent after 12 noon cannot be guaranteed a response from me.
      --- Friday, May 3rd , beginning of class - 3rd grid form & ROL due
      --- Friday, May 3rd, beginning of class - FINAL ABSOLUTE DEADLINE
      --- May 6-10 -- Presentation of Creative Measures; Report of Debriefings; Theory, Policy, Practice Discussions
      --- Friday, May 10th - Last Day of Class

    • Exam 2 Study Questions
      --- 1. After reading about the Colors Red, Black, Brown and Yellow, and the Invisible Color White, which Arrigo theory best fit for each group? Select a different theory for each group. (Do not use the same theory twice).Why. Provide examples from the readings to strengthen your argument.
      --- 2. Based on the theories introduced in Arrigo's book, what do you think the relationship between criminal justice and social justice should be? Why. Which theory comes closest to your viewpoint on this relationship? Why. Incorporate the Mann and Zatz book into your argument.
      --- 3. From Mann and Zatz, do you share their cautious optimism about the diminution of institutional racism beyond the millennium? Why. Incorporate the Arrigo readings into your answer.
      --- 4. Relating to Images of Color/Images of Crime , which two Arrigo theories makes the least sense to you? Why. And finally, which three theoretical perspectives from the Arrigo book makes the most sense to you? Why.
      --- 5. If you could change something within the criminal justice apparatus so that the system was more consistent with critical social justice principles, what would it be? Why. Incorporate both books into your essay.

    • Links to Lecture Notes and Other Things
      --- new On Roediger's Wages of Whiteness
      --- They Ain't Us: Identity as an Anti-Norm.
      --- Poem by Michael Witkofski.
      --- Poem by Adela Lozano.

    • Other Recommended Readings
      --- David Wellman. Portraits of White Racism.
      --- Robert Blauner. Black Lives, White Lives.

      --- Jurgen Habermas. Between Facts and Norms.
      --- Martha Minow. Making All the Difference: Exclusion, Inclusion and American Law. Check out this link Martha Minow on the Dear Habermas site.

    • Links to the Sociology of Law Handbook readings

      -- Introduction
      -- Chapter 1, part 1
      -- Chapter 1, part 2
      -- Chapter 2


      All UWP Classes, Fall 2001 Report of Learning (ROL)