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Social Welfare and Social Policy Links

California State University, Dominguez Hills
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Latest update: February 14, 2000
E-mailFaculty on the Site.

Social Work and Social Services Web Sites
Link added February 14, 2000.

Latino Social Workers' Organization
Link added February 14, 2000.

ServeWeb
A Web Page for Locating and Connecting Service Organizations through the Web
Link added September 3, 1999.

Great Home Page for Social Workers"
Link added July 1, 1999

Private Foundations on the Internet - Funding
Corporate Foundations on the Internet - Funding

Research Notes to Practice
Article in Children and Family Research Center Newsletter
at the University of Ilinois at Urbana-Champagne.
The Child and Family Research Center
Good source if you're interested in helping children and families.
Lead to links provided by Miranda Cole, CSUDH. Link added May 29, 1999.

California Responsible Parenting Site
Lead to links provided by Miranda Cole, CSUDH. Link added May 29, 1999.

Equal Justice Network
"Its mission is to strengthen and expand the provision of civil legal assistance
to low-income people through the collaborative efforts
of a community of advocates that includes legal services programs,
the private bar, social service and community organizations,
law schools, courts, advocacy groups at the state
and national levels, and poor people as advocates for themselves."
Link added May 23, 1999.

Agencies and the Concept of Helping: Who and How?
Beginning links for Fall 1999 course on agencies.

Social Welfare Policy at the American Enterprise Institute
Several articles online. Link added May 25, 1999.

More job sources added.
May 23, 1999.

Caregiving: Solutions, Support, Relief
Journalist's reports on problems encountered with the health of aging parents.
Broad range of material. Link added May 25, 1999.

Seniors-Site
Had trouble with the server on May 25, 1999.
Check the information on About the Site, and especially
the Site Map, which seems to offer a lot of information if we can be sure
of the sources and if the server works.
Link added on May 25, 1999.

Welfare Information Network
A Clearinghouse for Information, Policy Analysis & Technical Assistance on Welfare Reform
Link added May 23, 1999

Homelessness
On the Welfare Information Network
Link added May 23, 1999

Handsnet: Programs for Children, Families, People in Need
Program designed to link organizations and agencies trying to help.
Link added May 23, 1999

Center for Law and Social Policy
"CLASP is an organization of 14 professionals consisting of 8 lawyers
and 6 policy analysts whose work is concentrated on family policy
and access to civil legal assistance for low-income families."

Welfare Reform:

Privatization Discussed with Many Links
Tracking Welfare Reform

Opportunities for Advocacy, Internships, Community Service, Jobs:

Opporunities to Counsel Juveniles
Opportunities for Advocacy
Want to Help People? Visit The Helping Hand

L.A. Times' Kid's LAUNCH Site - Help with Homework!



Opportunities to Work with Juveniles and Justice

Subject: New Grants To Support Mentoring Efforts for At-Risk Youth

First Lady Announces New Grants To Support Mentoring Efforts for At-Risk Youth

The following press release was issued by the Office of Justice Programs (OJP) on February 3.

Washington, DC--First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton today announced that more than 7,500 at- risk young people in 37 States will receive one-on-one mentoring to help keep them in school and away from drugs and crime. More than $14 million in Justice Department grants will be distributed to 73 sites, including Los Angeles, New York City, Washington, DC, Chicago and Miami, through the Juvenile Mentoring Program (JUMP). With these new awards, there are now a total of 166 JUMP sites in 41 States.

"Adults who devote their time can make a huge difference in the lives of young people," said the First Lady. "In addition to helping with academic and social skills, mentors give youth the message that they are important and have something to contribute."


Where to Get More Info

The varied mentoring programs share three goals: improved academic performance, reduced school dropout rates and prevention of delinquent behavior. All sites are required to coordinate their activities with local schools. Some programs emphasize tutoring and academics, others emphasize vocational counseling and job skills.

Many sites will recruit law enforcement officers. College students, senior citizens, military personnel, business people, doctors, lawyers, government employees and teachers will serve as mentors in other programs. Prospective mentors can call a toll-fee number, 1-877-Be-A-Mentor (1-877-232-6368), to receive a list of nearby JUMP sites and other mentoring programs.

Young people participating in the projects will be drawn from first grade through high school. Thirty-three sites focus on minority youth, 7 sites target girls, while 2 sites focus exclusively on boys. Three sites target youth in public housing. Eleven projects will target court-involved youth while another four will include those youth along with other young people. One project will focus on abused and neglected youth.

The sites represent a strong cross-section of projects from every region in the Nation. Ten are predominantly rural, 55 are urban, 8 are suburban, while 1 is on an Indian reservation. All sites will also participate in the continuing national evaluation of JUMP.

Information about JUMP and other OJJDP programs, publications and conferences is available from OJJDP's Web site at www.ojjdp.ncjrs.org and from OJJDP's Juvenile Justice Clearinghouse, Box 6000, Rockville, Maryland 20857. The toll-free number is 1-800-638-8736. Copies of "Juvenile Mentoring Program: 1998 Report to Congress" will also be available through the Web site and Clearinghouse.

Information about other bureaus and program offices in the Justice Department's Office of Justice Programs is available at www.ojp.usdoj.gov. Media should contact OJP's Office of Congressional and Public Affairs at 202-307-0703.


The First Lady was joined at the East Room announcement by Attorney General Janet Reno and several mentors and participating youth from local JUMP programs.     

"We are seeing the positive results when schools, parents, and community volunteers come together to provide a network of support for our children," said Attorney General Reno. "But we can't stop now. We must continue to work with States and local communities to establish and expand mentoring programs and other prevention efforts."

The First Lady also announced the release of a report from the Justice Department's Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, which administers JUMP, and an OJJDP-funded database of qualified mentoring programs from across the Nation. "Juvenile Mentoring Program: 1998 Report to Congress" highlights initial evaluation findings from the 93 previously awarded JUMP projects. These projects all matched at-risk young people with adults over 21 who provide youth with discipline, guidance and personal attention through activities such as tutoring, job training and community service. Most of the mentors and participating youth believed that mentoring helped the young people improve their academic performance, avoid alcohol and drugs, and get along better with family and friends . "Through grants to help programs get started, research and evaluation to build our knowledge about effective programs, as well as other activities we are helping establish support for young people that will reduce delinquency in this country," said OJJDP Administrator Shay Bilchik. "We are helping communities provide a mentor for every young person who needs one."

OJJDP selected the 73 sites through a competitive review process from a pool of 424 applicants. Because of the high interest in JUMP and the quality of the applications, OJJDP combined Fiscal Year 1998 and Fiscal Year 1999 funds into a single round of awards. Awards range from $94,826 to $200,000 for use over the next three years.     

The varied mentoring programs share three goals: improved academic performance, reduced school dropout rates and prevention of delinquent behavior. All sites are required to coordinate their activities with local schools. Some programs emphasize tutoring and academics, others emphasize vocational counseling and job skills.

Many sites will recruit law enforcement officers. College students, senior citizens, military personnel, business people, doctors, lawyers, government employees and teachers will serve as mentors in other programs. Prospective mentors can call a toll-fee number, 1-877-Be-A-Mentor (1-877-232-6368), to receive a list of nearby JUMP sites and other mentoring programs.

Young people participating in the projects will be drawn from first grade through high school. Thirty-three sites focus on minority youth, 7 sites target girls, while 2 sites focus exclusively on boys. Three sites target youth in public housing. Eleven projects will target court-involved youth while another four will include those youth along with other young people. One project will focus on abused and neglected youth.

The sites represent a strong cross-section of projects from every region in the Nation. Ten are predominantly rural, 55 are urban, 8 are suburban, while 1 is on an Indian reservation. All sites will also participate in the continuing national evaluation of JUMP.

Information about JUMP and other OJJDP programs, publications and conferences is available from OJJDP's Web site at www.ojjdp.ncjrs.org and from OJJDP's Juvenile Justice Clearinghouse, Box 6000, Rockville, Maryland 20857. The toll-free number is 1-800-638-8736. Copies of "Juvenile Mentoring Program: 1998 Report to Congress" will also be available through the Web site and Clearinghouse.

Information about other bureaus and program offices in the Justice Department's Office of Justice Programs is available at www.ojp.usdoj.gov. Media should contact OJP's Office of Congressional and Public Affairs at 202-307-0703.