Link to Birdie Calendar Sharing Our Restorative Justice Studies with Youth in the Community

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California State University, Dominguez Hills
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Created: March 16, 2001
Latest update: March 16, 2001
E-Mailjeannecurran@habermas.org

Sharing Our Justice Studies with
Youth in the Community

  • Essay: Sharing Our Justice Studies with Youth in the Community
  • Discussion Questions

  • Camp Mom and Me To find Camp Mom and Me, you'll need to scroll down the left-most frame to link on that title. If you continue to scroll past the article in English, you will find a version in Spanish. Be sure also to read the earlier essay, Mom and Me.

  • Values A Think Quest site for young people. Explore the site.

  • Foozles A Site for Teaching Young People About Bullying and Teasing.


  • Sharing Our Justice Studies with Youth in the Community

    Review and Teaching Essay by Jeanne Curran and Susan R. Takata
    Copyright: Jeanne Curran and Susan R. Takata, March 2001. "Fair Use" encouraged.

    This essay is based on Camp Mom and Me Monthly message from the Interfaith Center for Peace To find Camp Mom and Me, you'll need to scroll down the left-most frame to link on that title. If you continue to scroll past the article in English, you will find a version in Spanish.

    In "Camp Mom and Me" we find one approach to peacemaking criminology. Bringing incarcerated mothers together with their children provides much needed training and learning for buiding peacemaking relationships within the family. This is a faith-based example that illustrates the important roles our religious groups play in focusing on the peacemaking aspects of love and caring that are predominant in most religions.

    Tracy Abeytas recently shared with us a project in which she created a hand-made book for one of her children, replete with messages of how she loved him. Her son was fascinated, and clearly wanted to keep the book with him. Such wonderful techniques of parenting are learned. Each time we manage to share love and caring, we are helping others to function in a loving environment. I hope many of you will share your experiences in this arena.



    Discussion Questions
    1. Read the article on Camp Mom and Me. Look at the pictures. What kind of learning does Camp Mom and Me rely on? Formal textbook understanding of parenting? or out-of-awareness modelling of parenting?

      jeanne's lecture notes on one plausible answer:

      The pictures and the text indicate that the camp relies on out-of-awareness learning.

    2. Which learning process, formal cognitive, or informal modelling, seems most appropriate in sharing our peacemaking skills with community members?

      jeanne's lecture notes on one plausible answer:

      Community members are not in school. They may not have been in school for a very long time. Formal teaching can be structurally violent to someone who feels he/she could not or did not achieve well in school, and who has not chosen to return to formal learning. Such formal approaches to teaching are structurally violent in that they force the person back into a school-type setting, which may have unpleasant memories. When trying to share our peacemaking skills we need to be sensitive to ways in which we may thus hurt another, even unintentionally.

      Think, for example, about the young person in college, who wants desperately for a parent to appreciate her/his achievement. In sharing, the young person may, unintentionally, hurt the parent by bringing back memories of the parent's lack of schooling. Just being aware of that possiblity of harm can help remind the young person to take the parent's memories into account with warmth and caring.

      Camp Mom and Me shares the efficacy of learning in less formal ways. Modelling and learning by doing are sometimes good approaches to sharing our understanding with other members of the community.

    3. How does this process relate to restorative justice?

      jeanne's lecture notes on one plausible answer:

      Restorative justice is an attempt to restore the community situation to one of mutual respect and understanding, after someone has transgressed in some way which harmed the community and/or its members. Restorative justice recognizes that punishing one who has transgressed does not effectively deal with why the transgression occurred and what can be done to prevent further harm by future transgressions.

      Restorative justice is a peacemaking approach in which we seek to heal the rift. Normative expectations have been violated. The community perceives that violation as harmful. Restorative justice tries to alter the structural context in ways that make future compliance with normative expectations more likely. But it also, when it is done well, examines the community's normative expectations to guarantee that they are not based on unstated assumptions which carry the seeds of discrimination and colonization within.