Link to Archive of Weekly Issues Transforming Discourse: Teaching Tolerance

Dear Habermas Logo and Link to Site Index A Justice Site



Transforming Discourse:
Teaching Tolerance

Mirror Sites:
CSUDH - Habermas - UWP
Practice Module on This File

California State University, Dominguez Hills
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Soka University Japan - Transcend Art and Peace
Created July 14, 1999
Latest Update: August 21, 2002

E-Mail Icon jeannecurran@habermas.org
takata@uwp.edu

Site Teaching Modules Transforming Discourse: Teaching Tolerance

Copyright: Jeanne Curran and Susan R. Takata and Individual Authors, August 2002.
"Fair use" encouraged.



Old Index, Not Yet completely transferred:

  • Guggenheim Exhibit Online: Africa
    Clickable maps on Art of Africa, and a photography exhibit.
    Link added July 14, 1999. Link checked August 12, 2002.

  • Classroom Activities
    Link to classroom activities, then scroll down almost to the bottom
    to "a list of Web sites." Some links are old and not working.
    But some are valuable. Link added July 14, 1999. Link checked Student Photographic Exhibit for Labor History Month
    Link checked July 14, 1999. Link checked August 12, 2002. Gardening Project
    Link checked July 14, 1999.



    Photographs of People Working for Labor History Month

    There is a wonderful collection of photographs of people at work. Children in classes based on the Teaching Tolerance Project took them. The exhibition of photos is fun in itself. But it also suggests summer fun for Dear Habaermas adults to share with the Dear Habermas KIds. Visit the exhibit. And send us any work the Dear Habermas Kids do. Or, for that matter, send us any work that Dear Habermas adults do.

    Student Photographic Exhibit for Labor History Month



    Garden Projects that Reflect Our Roots - An Old Shoe Will Do

    This project endeared itself to me right off when it suggested that we could plant flowers in anything, even an old shoe. What a wonderful idea! An old shoe garden. I'll bet there are some big feet in the neighborhood who would be glad to donate old shoes to a Garden of Diversity.

    I think it's really nice, too, that so many of the classroom gardens have been planted with flowers that come from wherever the people in the community came from. How would you know? Well, you'd have to talk to lots of them, wouldn't you? What a wonderful way to get to know the community.

    Visit the Gardening Project on the "Teaching Tolerance" Site.