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Trust

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California State University, Dominguez Hills
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Created: February 21, 2006
Latest Update: March 7, 2006

E-Mail Icon jeannecurran@habermas.org
takata@uwp.edu

Index of Topics on Site Trust as the Glue that Holds Us Together

Randy wrote in Message No. 10949:

"Every kind of peaceful cooperation among men is primarily based on mutual trust and only secondarily on institutions such as courts of justice and police."

Albert Einstein. German-Swiss-American mathematical physicist, famous for his theories of relativity.

Cops are no better or worse human beings.

jeanne wrote in Message No. 10971

Randy, I am interpreting this quote to mean that the glue that holds us together as people is mostly interpersonal relationships in which we come to know and rely on one another, rather than formal rules and procedures for getting along with one another when someone else has to step in to help us get along. Is that what you meant us to understand?

I googled trust Einstein quotation, from which I located the following as the fourth result on the list:

  • Quotes about Trust The quote Randy posted is No. 10 on Zaadz's list of quotations on trust.

A search engine like Google will often find sources for you. Practice. Ask Michael, or maybe even Randy, if he's willing, to help.

love and peace, jeanne

Discussion Questions

  1. What interpretation do you think Randy had in mind when he posted the quote from Einstein?

    Randy, I am interpreting this quote to mean that the glue that holds us together as people is mostly interpersonal relationships in which we come to know and rely on one another, rather than formal rules and procedures for getting along with one another when someone else has to step in to help us get along. Is that what you meant us to understand?

  2. Why do Susan and jeanne insist on sources?

    Consider that you can't legitimately use the information you are learning, if you can't go back and find the source. Not just for academic purposes, but also for in-depth discussions with friends, family, even strangers. Consensus, in spite of dominant discourse, is hard to come by. So in any reasoned discussion you are likely to encounter questions as to why or on what basis you believe your ideas to be correct. Even if the other person doesn't know his sources, and you can't resolve the issue during the live discussion, you have made both of you aware that there must be some accountability for the positions we take. We need to be able to give some kind of evidence or logic for our conclusions if we want to get them beyond pure affect. Hall's theory of affect in learning.

  3. How can you locate pertinent quotations on the Internet, in case you don't have a book handy?

    Index of Famous Quotes by Topic on Zaadz's Website. Randy often gives the link to this site. But I never had the time before to go check it out. Great site, Randy.

    Famous Quotes by Author on Zaadz's Website.

  4. What would we want to browse at length in a site like Zaadz?

    Consider that the Internet offers you several communities, like the Zaadz community forum, where you can find "thinking friends." I found several interesting comments there. But most of my time is consumed by setting up and posting for this site, so I can't take the time to participate faithfully in such forums. If you're not running your own site, they can be fun for the friendships they offer. You'll just need to shop around for a community that shares your interests and values in a way that makes you want to join them.

    I don't mean this to substitute for a real live face-to-face community. Both are important. jeanne

References:
Links that will lead us to more in-depth reading.

  • Learn Out Loud There are free articles you can download on many topics. There are lots more you can buy. And there is a free book you can download each month. Also now Podcasts. I haven't tried it yet, but have posted the site URL before. I was surprised to find a link to it on Zaadz at the bottom menu of the Zaadz Homepage file . See what following one of Randy's links can do for you.

  • Zaadz: "[T]he name. zaad. It's Dutch for 'seed.' "

    But a word of warning. One of their heroes is Ayn Rand. That gives me a quick insight to expect libertarian principles, intense focus on the individual, with few constraints of the individual in favor of the community as a whole. There is always a tension in this area, but they seem to lean in the libertarian direction after a quick walk through. That is reflected in their entrepreneurial focus. For those of you concerned about late capitalism, as I am, this may erect a tiny caution flag.

    Zaadz seems to provide a site hosting service with attention to making money. But some of you are going to want to make money, and some of you are interested in your own entrepreneurial endeavors. Even if you don't agree with the whole philosophy (Brian, the leader is business school trained), you can certainly find useful material here. Caveat: Arrogance of Knowledge sucks. Remember Humility of Knowledge. jeanne

    Zaadz also provides a community forum or discussion board that is free, though you must register to post. If you think Zaadz might be to your liking, that would be a way to get to know the community. As on tranform_dom, you can read the posts without joining. And their technology is better. You can select individual threads of the forum easily.



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