Link to What's New This Week UWP Commentary on Recent Lectures:Week of January 26, 2003

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UWP Commentary from Lectures - Week of January 26, 2003

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California State University, Dominguez Hills
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Soka University Japan - Transcend Art and Peace
Created: September 6, 2002
Latest Update: January 31, 2003

E-Mail Icon jeannecurran@habermas.org
takata@uwp.edu

Site Teaching Modules UWP Commentary on Recent Lectures:
Week of January 26, 2003

Site Copyright: Jeanne Curran and Susan R. Takata and Individual Authors, September 2002.
"Fair use" encouraged.

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Comments grouped by course.
Subject of comment in green.
susan's commentaries in bright blue. Template:

  • Student Name:



  • All UWP Classes

    On Wednesday, January 29, 2003, Kendra Schnorenberg wrote:
    On the PC workshop

    I do understand more of the teaching and our expectations, but the website seems overwhelming. A guy that had you before stayed after for a little bit helping me explore the website and explained the grid to me. It helped a lot, but I did not catch his name.

    kendra -- yes, it was information overload but i'm glad a student helped you. try to get his name so that he can get cooperation credit!

    On Wednesday, January 29, 2003, Kimberly With wrote:
    On the PC workshop

    Thanks for spending the time to go over the Dear Habermas website with us. I had looked at it once before and i felt really lost, but today after sitting down with people who have gone over it before, i now understand what is expected of me.

    kimberly -- you're very welcome! i think as time goes, it becomes much clearer.



    From CRMJ/SOCA 363: Corrections

    On Monday, January 27, 2003, Romila Labender wrote:
    On corrections, in general

    I found class very interesting today listening to the different articles and comments in class. I also found it shocking to know that 1 in 32 adults are in one way or another involved in the correction system.

    romila -- why do you think so many are under some form of correctional supervision?

    On Monday, January 27, 2003, Krista Lindemann wrote:
    On corrections, in general

    Just thought I would make a comment about some things you said this AM. I think our society should focus more on prevention, rather than treatment. You said something about the 200% increase in prison spending and only a 20% in education. I think by focusing on education and prevention, maybe the need for prisons and jails would lessen. We should teach children morals early on. Hopefully as generations continue, the need for prisons would fade out.

    krista -- based on these spendings, it does make you wonder where our priorities are?



    On Wednesday, January 29th, Kimberly With wrote:
    On discipline

    Towards the end of class we really got into the subject of discipline, when it comes to children. And i had to agree with most of the class, when they said it starts at home with the parents at a young age. Maybe parents don't have to hit their children, but i also think that a tap on the back side every once in awhile wouldn't hurt either. And i think its o.k. to hit your child, as long as it doesn't turn into an abusive situation. And really it shouldn't be other peoples business, on how you choose to raise your children. A child needs to learn right from wrong at a young age, and they need to learn it at home.

    kimberly -- yes, i wished we had more time today to continue this discussion but we'll try to resume it on friday in class. there is a fine line between disciplining an child and child abuse, though.



    On Friday, January 31st, Tracy Blauser wrote:
    On learning and corrections

    Susan, there is a huge intersection between learning and corrections. Regardless of your philosophy behind the punishment, it is imperative that the person UNDERSTAND why the punishment is occurring. Learning is neccesary to understand. If we are only teaching in one way, we are punishing those who learn another way under no justification. an example is that I can yell or talk sternly to my one daughterand she will understand and not do it again, but the other who has auditory learning disabilities this does not work on. She must be shown what she did was wrong and why. The same is true of adult corrctions system.

    tracy -- good point!

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    From CRMJ/SOCA 365: Race, Crime and Law

    Dan Stepler wrote on Friday, January 24th:
    On musical chairs

    . . . Also class today was very interesting. That one guy was getting carried away like there was a cash prize or something. But i like how we worked as a team to finish the game. But i do not see why some of the people gave up.

    dan -- yes, some people seem to be much more competitive than others. while others are much more cooperative than some. why is that? and that's a good question -- why do some people "give up?"

    Ray Fornal wrote on Sunday, January 27th:
    On musical chairs

    I was reading over some of the commentaries this morning and would have to agree with Dan's. This "certain" individual took the musical chairs game way out of proportion and cost others the actual enjoyment of it. Although I did have fun participating in this event, I didn't find a reason for this person's unneccesary aggressive behavior.

    ray -- yes, i agree with the both of you. it was just a "game," yet some are extremely competitive. why is that?

    Erin Matsunaga wrote on Friday, January 24th:
    On musical chairs

    Hi, I just wanted to comment on today's class about musical chairs. I liked the first one better. Personnally, I work better on my own, I don't like to rely on any one else and don't want anyone relying on me. Maybe that's something I need to work on, but I'm not sure.

    erin -- we all have different styles and preferences. some prefer to work alone while others like working in groups. but think about -- no man is an island, (we don't succeed all by ourselves). what do you think?

    Katie Knutsen wrote on Friday, January 24th:
    On musical chairs

    . . . I enjoyed playing musical chairs it not only taught us a lesson, but it made us get to know are classmates and laugh a bit. It was a nice change.

    katie -- glad you like musical chairs. it demonstrates a lot of concepts that we'll be discussing in class and it was fun!



    On Friday, January 24th, Kimberly With wrote:
    On competition

    At the end of class you asked us if we thought that society could ever be equal, were there was no winners or losers. While it is a wonderful thought i just don't think that i will ever be possible. We have been taught to be competitive from day one, back when the first people were on the earth, the stongest man won over the weakest man, when it came to hunting and gathering food. It is just a fact of life that there will always be people who win over other people. Somone will succeed while someone else ends of failing. It happens in school, sports, the workplace, and in sports. And its something that will never end up changing.

    kimberly -- just because something has always been this way, does that make it "good" or "right"? maybe there are other ways of doing things that we just never really considered because we haven't thought creatively "outside the box". what do you think?

    Krista Lindemann wrote on Monday, January 27th:
    On competition

    I think competivness has become such a huge part of our lives that we have begun to think there is only one side of this coin.--we often forget about cooperation. I think alot of it has to do with technology and the way we live our lives. We want everything (food, service, communication) right away. Those who can provide it the fastest last. Just like you said about stepping on the gas pedal the nanosecond after the light is green.

    krista -- why is it so easy to forget about cooperation? your point about wanting things faster reminds me a book by James Gleick called Faster which you might find interesting. He asks what does faster get us? (more things to do in less time? is that so good?)

    On Tuesday, January 28th, Heather Schultz wrote:
    On Creatures of Habit

    I was thinking about how people are creatures of habit, so I did a little experiment on my family. We always eat at the same place and have the same waitress. I decided that we were going to go somewhere else and everyone flipped out. Everyone was complaining the whole time about the wait, the food, the service, the alcohol, now it may be just me but all alcohol gets processed in the same place so how can it be different. It was very interesting to observe their reactions.

    heather -- that's fascinating, isn't it? you might want to try this one. i did it a few years when i was visiting 'home". sit in someone else's seat at the dinner table. mind you it's been a many, many years since i've lived at home. my younger brother said, "hey, you're in my chair" and my response was "i don't see your name on it." world war three was about to begin (and mind you, we're not little kids any more). funny, huh?

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    From CRMJ/SOCA 352: Law and Social Change

    On Monday, January 27th, Veronica Ramirez wrote:
    On Latinos and the Census

    I just wanted to give my opinion on the new Census that Latinos have passed African-Americans as the majority among the minorities. It was stated that some people felt that Latinos would somehow now benefit more than the rest, but I don't think that anyone should be worried...at least not right now. Latinos have not had many political leaders trying to make a change that directly benefits us. And the ones we have had didn't get very far. The only one who was able to accomplish something was Cesar Chavez. African-Americans, on the other hand, have had many leaders who are well known by people of all races, and I believe that they have helped in many areas. Besides, I think since we are all still minorities, we shouldn't feel intimidated by one another, we should work together to make some change for the good of all..........

    veronica --- good point! it's not just the numbers but more importantly, power is numbers plus organization.

    On Wednesday, January 29th , Kim Dexter wrote:
    Responded to Veronica's Comments

    I just read Veronica's comment on Habermas. Is Cesar Chavez really the only Latino that has ever accomplished anything - politically that is? I am planning on researching that. And why should anyone be worried that they might have more power or political clout?

    kim -- good idea! let me know what you find out.



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