Link to What's New This Week UWP Commentary on Recent Lectures:Week of February 16, 2003

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UWP Commentary from Lectures - Week of February 16, 2003

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California State University, Dominguez Hills
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Soka University Japan - Transcend Art and Peace
Created: September 6, 2002
Latest Update: February 21, 2003

E-Mail Icon jeannecurran@habermas.org
takata@uwp.edu

Site Teaching Modules UWP Commentary on Recent Lectures:
February 16, 2003

Site Copyright: Jeanne Curran and Susan R. Takata and Individual Authors, September 2002.
"Fair use" encouraged.

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Comments grouped by course.
Subject of comment in green.
susan's commentaries in bright blue. Template:

  • Student Name:



  • From CRMJ/SOCA 363: Corrections

    On Monday, February 17, 2003, Lisa Smith wrote:
    On Prison Problems

    Concerning class discussion today, there are so many problems in prison, you would be hard pressed to find just one to focus on, they need to look at the factors that turn people into criminals in the first place.

    lisa -- yes. i agree. the problems are so complex and multi-faceted. but if you have taken criminology, you will know that there are great debates on the various theories of crime causation, too!

    On Monday, February 17, 2003, Erin Matsunaga wrote:
    On prison problems

    About the questions today...isn't it more the theory that needs work on first instead of policy, practice; the theory of locking "bad" people away seems wrong to me. First, you would need to know if the reason for correction is punishment or rehabilitation. Also, most people should go to rehab for their problems, not just locked up and forgotten about!

    erin -- good question. which one needs fixing first? why.

    On Wednesday, February 19, 2003, Krista Lindemann wrote:
    On prison problems

    Susan, Speaking in class on Wednesday about the problems with prison, I think that instead of dumping tons of money into a band-aid solution (prisons) we should focus on prevention programs. I know you said in class that citizens don't want to wait 20 years to see results of thier money today. But if we consider this such a huge problem then we should be willing to make the sacrafice and take the risk.

    krista -- that sounds logical but what are the obstacles to focusing on prevention? why.



    On Wednesday, February 19th, Tracy Blauser wrote:
    On Hassine

    Hassine's analogy of the runaway train clearly illustrates my frustration with the criminal justice system. I've felt like I'm watching it, but helpless by myself to change anything. I hope I hear some good suggestions tomarrow.

    tracy -- yes, the problems are enormous but where do we begin? how? why?



    On Friday, February 21, 2003, Brian Schildbach wrote:
    On "Quiet Rage"

    I didn't get a chance to speak up in class on the topic i beleive the prison environment created the violent person or more violent prisoner. The basis of my back up would be the Stanford prison experiment. For all we know the first prisoners ever could have been wrongly accused.

    brian -- how does this documentary support your assertion?

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    From CRMJ/SOCA 365: Race, Crime and Law

    Brad Gietzel wrote on Monday, February 17th:
    On Fellman

    I think the whole felmen book is a crock but thats just me. The rituals of coersion he's right everthing we do is done for some kind of reason wich i guess could be considered a ritual. I don't agree with what he said about the future of war. I do think how ever that the U.S. should keep to its self and worry about its own economy and paying off the neverending debt before we go sticking our noses in where it don't belong.

    brad -- why do you think the fellman book is a "crock?" can you provide some examples? also it appears that you agree with some of the things he said.



    Lisa Smith wrote on Monday, February 17th:
    On "The Heart of Tibet"

    I enjoyed the film, he has a very powerful personality that comes through the screen. I never realized that things were that bad in Tibet , it is a shame.

    lisa -- he is fascinating person, isn't he? very charismatic. why do you think we don't hear much about tibet?

    Erin Matsunaga wrote on Monday, February 17th:
    On "The Heart of Tibet"

    Would it be possible to read up on the Dalai Lama? When we watched that movie in class, I realized that I knew nothing about him or that situation b/w Tibet and China. I wasn't sure if that was too far off base though.

    erin -- a good idea for creative measures. i listed some books by the dalai lama either on the current or previous class page.

    Dan Stepler wrote on Tuesday, February 18th:
    On "The Heart of Tibet"

    i was kinda not interested at first in the doc. but then how he could just be happy and bring so much peace to the world through his spirituality that it became interesting.

    dan -- what part of the documentary did you find the most interesting? why? you can read a book by the dalai lama for a creative measure if you'd like.

    Wayne Berry wrote on Tuesday, February 18th:
    On "The Heart of Tibet"

    it appeared to me by watching "The Heart of Tibet", a world religion was being proposed. Only through the religious meditation that is a ritual to Dalai Lama can someone see peace. That is like proposing a world government.

    wayne -- how possible or how realistic is this? why?



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    From CRMJ/SOCA 352: Law and Social Change

    On Wednesday, February 19th, Veronica Ramirez wrote:
    On "The Incident at Oglala"

    I did not understand why there were federal agents looking for a man who stole boots in the first place. Did I miss some big detail. B/C if they just happened to be assigned that case it would seem to be out of the ordinary. Why not just leave it up to cops?

    veronica --- no, i don't think you missed anything. it does raise some interesting questions, doesn't it? if you're interested, you can research the peltier case further.

    On Wednesday, February 19th , Jay Bolina wrote:
    On "Incident at Oglala"

    . . .The video on the Incident on Ogala further shows that the criminal justice system still overlooks evidence and just wants a "cop-out" to wrap up a case.

    jay -- both sides seem pretty sure about their respective positions given the outcome, though. why such a rush to wrap up the case as you put it? want to research the peltier case further?

    On Wednesday, February 19th , Krista Lindemann wrote:
    On "Incident at Oglala"

    In response to the movie. It is pretty scary to think that this huge case all began with a petty theft of stealing boots. My question is if you knew someone was holding back pertinent information (that is "X") why wouldn't you tell the authorities about him. I know that he said it was because of his beliefs, but when it comes to spending the rest of your life in prison, I think it is time that information be released

    krista -- it is hard to imagine that peltier knows "who dunnit" but won't tell. and the price of not telling is prison til the year 2035.

    On Thursday, February 20th , Kim Faulkner wrote:
    On "Incident at Oglala"

    I thought this movie was an excellent example of injustice in the criminal justice system. How can you convict and sentence someone in a case which has so many holes in it?

    On Thursday, February 20th , James Spiller wrote:
    On "Incident at Oglala"

    . . . Also, the Documentary that we watched on Monday and Wednesday "Incident at Ogalala" n my opinion was a tragic abuse of power by our Government. The inconsistencies did not make logical sense, and to me it was an example of the Gov't wanting to "get their man" and going to extreme, shady lengths to make that happen.

    kim and james -- good question - how is this possible?

    On Thursday, February 20th , Amanda Boyd wrote:
    On "Incident at Oglala"

    I thought it was kind of astonishing to watch what the FBI did in response to the AIM movement in the 1970's. I never even knew that happened.

    amanda -- why is it that some are not aware of this case?

    On Friday, February 21st , Nick Fucile wrote
    On "Incident at Oglala"

    I still can't believe how Indians were treated and how it hasn't changed. Not a lot of people know a lot about the Indian culture or even laws, for instance in the movie we watched. Who were the people on the jury?

    nick -- why aren't moe people aware of American Indian culture?



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