Link to What's New This Week UWP Commentary on Recent Lectures:Week of March 30, 2003

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UWP Commentary from Lectures - Week of March 30, 2003

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California State University, Dominguez Hills
University of Wisconsin, Parkside
Soka University Japan - Transcend Art and Peace
Created: September 6, 2002
Latest Update: April 3, 2003

E-Mail Icon jeannecurran@habermas.org
takata@uwp.edu

Site Teaching Modules UWP Commentary on Recent Lectures:
Week of March 30, 2003

Site Copyright: Jeanne Curran and Susan R. Takata and Individual Authors, September 2002.
"Fair use" encouraged.

* * * * *
Comments grouped by course.
Subject of comment in green.
susan's commentaries in bright blue. Template:

  • Student Name:



  • From CRMJ/SOCA 363: Corrections

    On Monday, March 31, 2003, Krista Lindemann wrote:
    On probation and parole

    IN RESPONSE TO THE DISCUSSION IN CLASS THIS MORNING ABOUT MEASURING THE EFFECTIVNESS OF PROBATION AND PAROLE PROGRAMS, I THINK THE THRESHOLD USED TO MEASURE SHOULD NOT JUST PICK A PERCENTAGE AND THEN THAT DETERMINE IT TO BE SUCCESSFUL OR NOT. IT NEEDS TO BE COMPARED TO SOMETHING, AND I THINK THAT SHOULD BE COMPARING HOW MANY RE-ENTRY INTO PRISON THERE IS WITH PROBATION OR PAROLE, AND HOW MANY RE-ENTRY THERE ARE WITH INDIVIDUALS WHO DIDN'T PARTICIPATE IN PROBATION OR PAROLE.

    krista -- i agree that there are measures other than "numbers" that are important when determining program success.



    On Wednesday, April 2, 2003, Lindsay Weinstein wrote:
    On reactions to "Voices from Inside"

    What caught my attention in the movie we watched in class was how different prison from the female perspective seems to be as compared to the male. While the "LA Co." and "Prison Gangs and Racism" videos covered life in prison from the male point of view, showing how violent and tough prison life is, this documentary showed women as being sad, helpless, and mainly working to serve their time so that they can get out and be with their loved ones. As one inmate said, "I don't want to be in this reality, I want to go home". It seemed to me that the women related more to eachother and were there for support of one another.

    lindsay -- yes, some interesting gender comparisons. we'll be watching the conclusion in class on friday.

    On Wednesday, April 2, 2003, Tracy Blauser wrote:
    On reactions to "Voices from Inside"

    the most stark contrast I noticed in hte documentary today from the previous was the appearance of the women. They had jewelry, make up,jeans. I wasn't expecting that at all.

    tracy -- an interesting observation. but the costume and make up was part of the presentation/performance.

    On Thursday, April 3, 2003, Shannon Schiele wrote:
    On reactions to "Voices from Inside"

    I could not beleive the fate that and horrible misfortune that Aida has been through and how it still is not changing for the better. She is an example for everyone that no matter what life deals you, the only thing in your control is your attitude. I personally could not picture myself in that position without having my spirit and will broken.(by positive attitude I mean that given her situation she has done a more than wonderful job adapting as well as being rehabilitated.) How can we set the same amount of jail/prison time for everyone when some learn from their mistakes faster and rehabilitate faster? Yet we continue to punish after the punishment has served it's purpose.

    shannon -- the resiliency of the human spirit. are you interested in researching women in prison, maybe?

    On Thursday, April 3, 2003, Chrissy Knox wrote:
    On reactions to "Voices from Inside"

    I really enjoyed the film in class yesterday. It was very interesting to see prison from the point of view of a woman. I really thought that it was interesting when the woman said that prison was like living in a bathroom with someone you never met. It really is kind of true.

    chrissy -- that description of prison is quite an image. that's one of the things that sticks out in my mind from this documentary.



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    From CRMJ/SOCA 365: Race, Crime and Law

    Heather Schultz wrote on Monday, March 31st:
    On reactions to "Without Due Process"

    I feel that the situation that the Japanese were placed in could very easily happen again. I feel that a very minimal amount has already occured with those individuals who fit the "terrorist" description. Those of Muslim decent could very easily have to endure the same as the Japanese becuase of 9/11. It would be so much easier for our government to do that so that we do not have to have terror alerts on the homefront. I feel that the way the war is going, anything could and will happen. The movie was an excellent example of what we do not learn about in class. It was very informative and put a different perspective on life.

    heather -- i'm glad you liked today's documentary but why is it we do not learn about things like this in other classes?

    Jessie DuBois wrote on Thursday, April 3rd 31st:
    On reactions to "Without Due Process"

    Heather said something about how now maybe people of Muslim decent could be persecuted like the Japanese Americans were. I disagree because if you watch on the news the muslim people of Iraqi decent in the United States are all signing up to go fight for the United States and are excited to do so. They also want to see change in their home country and say they can contribute a lot because they know where things are and such about their country. I think times have changed and we as humans and especially as Americans are less likely to point the finger than we were in the past.

    jessie -- some have mentioned that they've been racially profiled more since september 11, 2001.

    Tony Ciardo wrote on Monday, March 31st:
    On reactions to "Without Due Process"

    Watching the video today made me think why didn't the japanese go to the supreme court or government about their rights being taken away from them. The United States went against the U.S. constitution and took their rights right from under there feet. It just shows you how corrupt the system really is.

    tony -- you raise some important issues here. you might want to check out michi weglyn's years of infamy for some of the answers. there were three cases that went before the supreme court -- korematsu, hirabayashi and endo.

    Wayne Berry wrote on Monday, March 31st:
    On reactions to "Without Due Process"

    i enjoyed the video in todays class.The question was asked whether this could happy again? I believe it has in the 60,s with the civil rights movement, although those folks were not incarcerated in camps. They were followed much like the Arabs are today.

    wayne -- your point is well taken. there have been discussions whether or not the same thing might happen to arab americans.

    Krista Lindemann wrote on Monday, March 31st:
    On reactions to "Without Due Process"

    MY REACTION TO THE CONCENTRATION CAMP MOVIE WAS STRONGLY INFLUENCED BY THE LAST REMARK THAT THE GENTLEMAN MADE. HE CLAIMED SOMETHING LIKE THIS COULD HAPPEN AGAIN WITH A DIFFERENT GROUP OF PEOPLE. I IMMEDIATELY THOUGHT OF THE MIDDLE EAST INDIVIDUAL RESIDING IN THE U.S. CURRENTLY. WITH ACTS OF TERRORISM AND WAR WITH IRAQ, THEY ARE OFTEN LOOKED UPON AS BEING PART OF THE TERRORISTS NETWORK OR THE LIKE. I WOULDN'T BE SURPRISED IF THE GOVERNMENT DECIDED TO DO SOMETHING LIKE THEY DID TO THE JAPANESE.

    krista -- right after september 11th, many in the japanese-american community had "flashbacks" of the internment years and how it "can" happen again. that's a scary thought.

    Tony Ciardo wrote on Thursday, April 3rd:
    On reactions to "Without Due Process"

    i was reading some on the thoughts about the video we just watched and i came upon krista's message and i would have to disagree with it. I don't think that the U.S. would ever put the middle east people in the U.S. in concentration camps because all the amendments of the U.S. Constitution would be broken and people would go against the government because people now a days have lots of money. back then the japenese couldn't do anything because they didnt have any money to go against the government. so i think that it would never happen in the U.S.

    tony -- how do you explain the detention of post-september 11th individual held at that U.S. military base/prison in Cuba, then? is that the same or different? why.

    Kimberly With on Wednesday, April 2nd:
    On reactions to "Without Due Process"

    When we watched the movie in class i was totally surprised, i had never learned about that during all of my years of school. Is was such a shock to me that something like that happened. It was a real eye opener.

    kimberly -- why do you think it has never been introduced in a class til now?



    Pleshette Robinson wrote on Thursday, April 3rd:
    On class discussion

    I Pleschette Robinson was pleased in our Race, crime, and law class yesterday, we accepted everyone's comments and their was no commotion between anyone.

    pleschette -- i agree. illocutionary discourse works!

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    From CRMJ/SOCA 352: Law and Social Change

    On Monday, March 31st, Kim Faulkner wrote:
    On reactions to "hablas ingles?"

    After viewing this movie I wanted to make a few comments I feel that when one moves to a different country they need to learn the dominate language. I was to go to another country I think that I need to learn the language. I am going into their country they should not have to learn English to accommodate me, I should accommodate them. Another thing that is a major controversy is Bilingual education. I think this is very important. To help students out instead of having them sink or swim. One thing that I think would be good is to have foreign languages taught in younger grades instead of high school and college I think the students would retain much more.

    kim --- why are these two issues so controversial? which theory from the arrigo book best applies to these two issues? why.

    On Monday, March 31st, Kim Dexter wrote:
    On language and legislature

    FYI The Governor's budget includes new funding for court interpreters in all kinds of cases including family, small claims, and domestic violence restraining order hearings. And... Secretary Thompson announced creation of "Su Familia" National Hispanic Family Health Helpline. He states there is a "health gap" in Hispanic communities. The helpline will provide information about local health providers (including community and migrant health centers) and federally supported programs.

    kim -- thanks for letting me know!

    On Wednesday April 2nd, Heidi Schneider wrote:
    On English First

    I looked up the English First website and found their three goals... * Make English America's official language. * Give every child the chance to learn English. * Eliminate costly and ineffective multilingual policies. I find it intresting that the last goal is there becuase it doesn't say anything about educating adults who are already here and they are the ones who havethe power to vote. I think this is partiaclya way to eliminate the non-english speakingvoters becuase now that they are higher in numbers they have more political weight.

    heidi -- you might want to do a website review. also, how does this website relate to constitutive crim?



    On Wednesday, April 2nd , Amanda Boyd wrote:
    On new technology and social change

    I just wanted to comment on our discussion in class on Monday about cell phones. Cell phones are beginning to be one of my pet peeves. Someone in class made a comment about how cell phones have taken away from peoples manners. I completely agree with that. I'm a cashier and I hate when people are talking on their phones instead of paying attention. I also don't understand the people who talk on it while their in the library. I wish these people could watch themselves on camera and see just how rude they're being.

    amanda -- i don't have a cell phone yet. not sure i need one (yet). but how about those who are talking (more accurately, yelling) on the cell phone for all to hear? doesn' t that drive you nuts?

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