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College of Professional Studies
Location: Welch Hall
Phone: 1-800-344-5484
Fax: 310-516-3542

Program Office:
1000 E Victoria Street, WH-A320, Carson, CA 90747 (310)243-2029 cdevelopment@csudh.edu

Electives

Purpose

Elective coursework is included in the curriculum to provide students with an opportunity to acquire knowledge and skills that they may require for the professional position they hope to work in, but may not receive through Core coursework.

For example, a student who is interested in working in the early childhood education would benefit from taking courses in early language and math learning.  Similarly, students interested in Occupational Therapy might consider completing requisite courses in Biology.

Criteria for Elective Courses

Courses chosen to fulfill the Elective coursework requirement must meet the following criteria:

  • Students must complete 12 units of electives.
  • Course content must not duplicate content covered in Core coursework or General Education (GE) coursework.
  • A minimum of 6 units must be upper division courses.

How to choose Elective Courses

Students must have their Elective coursework approved before enrolling in the courses.  Students are required to meet with a Child Development Faculty Advisor to select Elective courses. Please contact the Child Development office to set up an appointment. Once approved, electives may be taken at any time after lower division GE requirements have been met.
Before meeting with a Faculty Advisor, students must reflect on what they wish to do upon graduating with a bachelor’s degree and the knowledge/skills they may require for the position that is/are not addressed in the Core coursework. Students must complete an Electives Proposal/Approval Form and bring the completed form with them to their advisement appointment. All proposed courses must apply to your stated professional goal and must be submitted and approved together.

The following areas of interest have been designed to help students in their elective selection process. Please (1) review the following areas of interest and (2) select your proposed electives from the courses listed in these options.

Areas of Interest in Child Development

Applying Prior Coursework towards the Elective Requirement

If you have taken coursework elsewhere that you think could meet the Elective coursework requirement (see criteria above), please complete a course substitution form and submit it to your faculty advisor for approval. Not all courses are eligible for substitution. To have potential course substitutions evaluated, bring the following materials to your advisement appointment: (1) a completed Course Substitution Form, (2) a complete set of transcripts to provide evidence of course completion, and (3) a copy of the original course syllabus so the substance of the course can be evaluated.

Early Teaching and Learning:

The courses recommended for Early Teaching and Learning are designed to prepare students to enhance children’s language and math learning in early childhood. Students who intend to work as preschool teachers, childcare providers, or develop curriculum for childcare centers would benefit from selecting the courses in this option. Students will gain an understanding of the concepts and theories associated with language and math development and learning from birth through age 5. Students will learn how to plan and implement age-appropriate learning experiences as well as assess children’s abilities in these two domains.


Recommended Courses (12 units):

  • LBS 310 – Early Language and Learning (3)
  • LBS 320 – Emergent Literacy and Learning (3)
  • LBS 330 – Bridging Cultures through Literacy and Learning (3)
  • LBS 340 – Learning Early Mathematical Concepts and Reasoning (3)

Counseling and Clinical Psychology:

The courses recommended for Counseling and Clinical Psychology are designed for students who are interested in pursuing advanced degrees in counseling or clinical psychology. Students will gain background knowledge and skills to prepare them for entry into graduate programs such as marriage and family therapy, social work, counseling, and clinical psychology. Students should (1) examine the admission requirements for the graduate programs they plan to apply for and (2) select elective courses accordingly.

Recommended Courses (6 units):

  • PSY 367 – Effective Communication Skills or SOC 341 – Seminar in Small Groups (3)
  • PSY 363 – The Abnormal Personality (3)

Select two additional courses from the following (6 units):

  • SOC 320 – The Family (3)
  • SOC 363 – Sociology of Alcohol and Other Drug Use (3)
  • PSY 314 – Behavior Modification (3)
  • PSY 320 – Psychopharmacology (3)
  • PSY 360 – Theories of Personality (3)
  • PSY 353 – The Experience of Death and Dying: Psychological Perspectives (3)
  • PSY 464 – Introduction to Clinical Psychology (3)
  • PSY 470 – Community Psychology: Issues and Practices (3)

Family Services:

The courses recommended for Family Services are designed for students who may work in a variety of career settings serving families and children. Students interested in careers in/as family and child services, social work, parent educators, or child life specialists would benefit from taking courses in this area. Students will gain knowledge and skills pertaining to working with families, cultural diversity in child and family services, and common problems in families and communities.

Recommended Courses (6 units):

  • PSY 367 – Effective Communication Skills or SOC 341 Seminar in Small Groups (3)
  • SOC 320 – The Family (3)

Select two additional courses from the following (6 units):

  • PUB 371 – Health Services Administration and Public Policy Development (3)
  • SOC 306 – Program Evaluation (3)
  • SOC 328 – Social Agencies Practice and Power (3)
  • SOC 363 – Sociology of Alcohol and Other Drug Use (3)
  • SOC 386 – Sociology of the Helping Professions (3)
  • PSY 314 – Behavior Modification (3)
  • PSY 353 – The Experience of Death and Dying: Psychological Perspectives (3)
  • PSY 363 – The Abnormal Personality (3)
  • PSY 470 – Community Psychology: Issues and Practices (3) (Prerequisite: PSY 363)

Juvenile Justice:

The courses recommended for Juvenile Justice are designed for students who intend to work with troubled youth in community organizations, juvenile courts, group homes, and/or youth programs for high-risk youth. Potential careers include guidance counselors, probation officers, or youth program coordinators. Students will gain an understanding of (1) the theories, policies, and procedures of the juvenile justice system and (2) the causes of delinquent behavior among adolescents as well as the adjustment problems and treatment of delinquent youth. Students will have an opportunity to gain knowledge about (1) the development and perpetuation of gangs and adolescent subcultures, (2) social interactions and facilitation of small groups (especially for students who plan to facilitate youth group interventions), (3) drug and alcohol use and abuse (a common problem behavior among adolescents), (4) the forms and processes of deviant behavior, or (5) the political, social, and cultural factors associated with criminal justice administration and police-community relations.

Recommended Courses (6 units):

  • CJA 444 – Juvenile Justice Process (3)
  • SOC 369 – Juvenile Delinquency (3)

Select two courses from the following (6 units):

  • SOC 341 – Seminar in Small Groups (3) or PSY 367 – Effective Communication Skills (3)
  • SOC 362 - Gangs and Adolescent Subcultures (3)
  • SOC 363 – Sociology of Drug and Alcohol Use (3)
  • SOC 365 – Deviant Behavior (3)
  • CJA 340 – Criminal Justice and the Community (3)

Management and Administration:

The courses recommended for Management and Administration are designed to prepare students for careers as managers, supervisors, or owners of child and adolescent-related businesses or organizations. Students will gain an overall understanding of management theory and organizational dynamics. In addition, they will acquire knowledge and skills in specialized areas of business that coincide with their professional interests and goals. Students will have an opportunity to gain skills in accounting, human resource management, and business and interpersonal communication skills.

Recommended Courses (6 units):

  • MGT 310 – Management Theory (3)
  • MGT 312 – Organizational Behavior (3) (Prerequisite: MGT 310)

Select two additional courses from the following (6 units):

  • PSY 367 – Effective Communication Skills (3)
  • HRM 313 – Human Resource Management (3) (Prerequisite: MGT 310)
  • BUS 300 – Business Communications (3)
  • ACC 230 – Financial Accounting (3)
  • ACC 231 – Managerial Accounting (3) (Prerequisite: ACC 231)

Nonprofit Management:

The courses recommended for Non-Profit Management are designed to prepare students for careers as managers, supervisors, coordinators, or founders of non-profit organizations that focus on the enrichment and development of children and adolescents. Students will gain an overall understanding of public administration management and behavior. In addition, they will acquire knowledge and skills geared towards (1) understanding the philosophical, economic, political, and social basis of non-profit organizations, (2) managing non-profit organizations, and (3) acquiring the capital to fund a non-profit.

Recommended Courses (9 units):

  • PUB 301 – Administrative Leadership and Behavior (3)
  • PUB 450 – Nonprofit and Voluntary Sectors (3)
  • PUB 451 – Managing the Nonprofit Organization (3) (Prerequisite: PUB 450)

Select one additional course from the following (3 units):

  • PUB 300 – Foundations of Public Administration (3)
  • PUB 452 – Fundraising and Fund Development (3) (Prerequisites: PUB 450 & PUB 451)
  • PUB 426 – Intergovernmental Relations and Grant-Writing (3)

Pre-Occupational Therapy:

The courses recommended for Pre-Occupational Therapy are designed to prepare students for entry into an Occupational Therapy (OT) master’s program. Students will gain general knowledge and skills in human anatomy, physiology, and kinesiology. In addition, students will gain an understanding of the causes and manifestations of psychological disorders. The required courses are common admissions and prerequisite requirements for Occupational Therapy programs. Students, however, should check the current admission requirements for the specific universities they plan to apply to as admission requirements vary by university and are subject to change.

Recommended Courses (10 units):

  • BIO 250/251 – Elements of Human Anatomy and Physiology and Lab (4)
  • PSY 363 – The Abnormal Personality (3)
  • KIN301 – Kinesiology (3)

Select one course from the following:

  • KIN300 – Test and Measurements in Physical Education (3)
  • KIN233 – Practicum in Physical Education (3)
  • KIN250 – Analysis of Aquatics (2)

Children and the Arts:

The courses recommended for Children and the Arts are designed to allow students to develop an understanding of arts in relation to children’s development as well as to learn the skills necessary for engaging children in the arts. These courses focus on the important contribution of the expressive arts to the development of children and youth.

Select four courses from the following (12 units):

  • SOC 321 – Sociology of Education or SOC 322 – Social Environment of Education (3)
  • ART  301 – Arts and Crafts for the Non-Major (3)
  • DAN 440 – Dance for Children or KIN 447 – Dance Education in the Elementary School (3)
  • MUS 340 – Music for Children (3)
  • THE 337 – Creative Dramatics (3)
  • ENG 308 – Critical Approaches to Children’s Literature (3)

Community Intervention:

The courses recommended for Community Intervention are designed for students who intend to work in community or government agencies with the goal to enhance the positive and healthy functioning of youth and their families. Many recent community interventions have been heavily influenced by public health approaches. Comprehensive prevention strategies typically involve multiple contexts (e.g., family, community, schools, youth organizations, health professionals, public agencies) and are maintained for several years to positively affect a population. Communitywide programs may aim to reduce risk and enhance protective factors to alleviate various social problems including substance abuse, health and mental health issues, school failure, and teen pregnancy.  Community interventions may include: citizen mobilization, situational prevention, comprehensive community interventions, mentoring, afterschool recreation programs, policing strategies, policy change, and media interventions.
Classes address theories and issues in community studies, and ethics and will prepare students for careers in areas such as research, program evaluation, social work, non-profit management, urban planning, and public policy.

Recommended Courses (6 units):

  • SOC306 – Program Evaluation (3)
  • PUB371 – Health Services Administration and Public Policy Development (3)

Select two courses from the following (6 units):

  • PSY 470 – Community Psychology: Issues & Practices (3; Prerequisite PSY 363)
  • SOC 384 – Resistance, Inequalities, and Communities (3)
  • PUB 373 – Health Policy (3; Prerequisite PUB 371)
  • POL370 – Public Opinion and Propaganda (3)
  • POL 312 – State and Local Government: Organization and Problems (3)
  • POL 318 – Public Policy Choices: Distribution of Wealth (3)
  • CJA 340 – Criminal Justice and the Community (3)
  • SOC 367 – Sociology of Law (3) or CJA 340 Criminal Justice & the Community (3)