Courses

Below are brief summaries of each HUX course. They are not the official catalog descriptions. Official descriptions are available online at the CSUDH Catalog webpage.

Undergraduate Courses for Nursing Students Only

Each HUX course below is accompanied by a student study guide or syllabi, called a "course guide," which is a specially prepared packet (produced by the Humanities External Degree faculty and updated by the staff) to provide the framework for independent learning.

PHASE I - INTRODUCTORY COURSES
These courses give students a general review of each discipline. Courses are offered on a rotating schedule at least once each academic year.

HUX 501 - Defining the Humanities: History (2)
Advanced study of the nature of history through examination of historical method and its application to a history book of the student's choice.
HUX 502 - Defining the Humanities: Literature (2)
Advanced study of the nature of literature by examination of images of self in selected poems and novels.
HUX 503 - Defining the Humanities: Music (2)
Advanced study of music, focusing on concepts of meaning and form in music at a philosophical rather than theoretical level. The ability to read music is not required.
HUX 504 - Defining the Humanities: Art (2)
Advanced study of key concepts in art by focusing on aesthetics and art theory.
HUX 505 - Defining the Humanities: Philosophy (2)
Advanced study of key concepts of Philosophy by focusing on contemporary issues and conflicts and their analogies in traditional philosophical readings.



PHASE II - ELECTIVE COURSES
Courses can be used as substitutes for other disciplinary courses (with Coordinator approval). Courses are offered on a rotating schedule at least once each academic year.

HUX 521 - Humanities Encounter: The Living Theatre (3)
How to recognize, appreciate and evaluate a variety of dramatic experiences. Requires extensive notebook of descriptions and analyses of eight different types of theatrical performances.
HUX 522 - Humanities Encounter: Concert Music (3)
Attendance and analysis of several concerts representing the general categories of symphonic, vocal and chamber music. Critical reviews required for each of six musical encounters.
HUX 523 - Humanities Encounter: History (3)
Exploring the historical roots of one's own community. Requires papers (including photographs) involving descriptions and analyses of five different historical sites.
HUX 524 - Humanities Encounter: Film Encounter (3)
Watching and analyzing several movies with special focus on the techniques and content of the medium. Requires extensive notebook of descriptions and analyses of eight different film experiences.



PHASE II - INTERDISCIPLINARY COURSES
These courses integrate some or all areas of the humanities into singular discussions. Courses are offered on a rotating schedule at least one time each academic year.

HUX 530 - War and Human Experience (3)
Prerequisite: HUX 501 is recommended. An examination, through readings in history and literature, of the nature of war and its effects on individuals, families, groups and communities. The course will draw on a wide range of examples, including conflicts in the ancient world, modern Europe and the United States.
HUX 532 - Slavery in History and Literature (3)
Examines the institution of slavery from an interdisciplinary humanistic perspective utilizing a comparative approach. Surveys slavery from ancient times to the present in all parts of the world, with focus upon American slavery.
HUX 540 - Evolution of Human Culture (3)
An examination of the nature of change and cultural unfolding, using the development of the city as a key concept, and looking into three representative types of cities: ancient, medieval, and modern.
HUX 541 - The Rational Perspective (3)
The meaning of rationality from the perspectives of philosophy, history, literature, music and art. Special emphasis on the possible differences between scientific and humanistic rationality.
HUX 542 - The Para-Rational Perspective (3)
Interdisciplinary exploration of non-rational alternatives in modern culture, focusing on the non-logical, the visionary, and the religious/mystical.
HUX 543 - The Autonomous Individual (3)
Interdisciplinary study of the nature of the creative act, including the following: the artist's vision of self; the defenses of personalism; notions of aesthetics and of symbolic thought.
HUX 544 - The Individual and Society (3)
Exploration of the position of the individual in the classic and modern models of social and political organization; conservatism, liberalism, socialism, anarchism; study of the Utopian tradition; and study of aesthetic theories that connect the artist with society.
HUX 545 - The Non-Western World (3)
Interdisciplinary examination of the non-western world by focusing on cultural characteristics of China and Japan.
HUX 546 - Alienation, Estrangement and Subcultures (3)
Survey of the elements and historical implications of alienation and examination of subcultures as they exist in America. Readings from social Philosophy as well as from Chicano and African-American studies.
HUX 547 - World Religious Perspectives (3)
Survey of ancient and modern religious systems, focusing upon an exploration of the general characteristics of religious beliefs.
HUX 548 - Values and Morality in 20th Century Thought (3)
An examination of values and morality in modern culture against a backdrop of seemingly amoral scientific and technological progress.



PHASE II - DISCIPLINARY COURSES: Key Individuals
These courses allow students to examine specific characters of the Humanities. Courses are offered on a rotating schedule at least one time each academic year.

HUX 550 - Key Individuals, Art: Frank Lloyd Wright (3)
Intensive study of the major buildings and architectural influence of Frank Lloyd Wright.
HUX 551 - Key Individuals, Music: Beethoven (3)
An examination of the life and music of Ludwig Van Beethoven. The ability to read music is not required, though helpful.
HUX 552 - Key Individuals, Philosophy: Rousseau (3)
An examination of the life, thought, and influence of Rousseau, focusing on several recurrent themes: self-other, rational/non-rational, classic-romantic, dependence-independence, democracy-totalitarianism.
HUX 553 - Key Individuals, Literature: Hemingway and Faulkner (3)
An examination of the major works and influence of two modern American authors, Ernest Hemingway and William Faulkner.
HUX 554 - Key Individuals., History: Carnegie, Rockefeller and Ford (3)
The rise of American industrial capitalism, viewed through the activities of three business giants, and the course of American economic history to the present, with special emphasis on World War I and the Great Depression.
HUX 555 - Key Inds., History: Stalin (3)
Prerequisite: HUX 501 is recommended. Stalin was arguably the most powerful and effective leader in history, whose influence will be felt for ages to come. Examines Stalin the person through a biography; his effect upon the people, through a novel; and his place in history as interpreted today.
HUX 556 - Nobel Laureates: Studies in Modern World Literature (3)
An examination of representative major works by recent Nobel Laureates whose art epitomizes diverse cultural, literary, and social viewpoints. Authors include Mann, Pirandello, Camus, Kawabata, Solzhenitsyn, Neruda, and Bellow.



PHASE II - DISCIPLINARY COURSES: Key Periods and Movements
These courses allow students to examine specific events of the Humanities. Courses are offered on arotating schedule at least one time each academic year.

HUX 557 - Key Periods and Movements, Philosophy: Greeks: Philosophy, Tragedy and the Polis (3)
Prerequisite: HUX 505. An examination of the emergence of philosophy out of the "mythical" thinking that precedes and continues within it. How classical Greek philosophy contrasted with Greek tragic poetry.
HUX 570 - Key Periods and Movements, Art: Contemporary (3)
Exploration of the complex cultural development known as modern art by investigation of six major artistic movements: Cubism, Expressionism, Dada/Surrealism, Pop Art, Conceptual Art and Technological Art.
HUX 571 - Key Periods and Movements, Music: Baroque (3)
An examination of Baroque music and the period in Western Europe (1600-1750) during which it evolved. The ability to read music is not required, though helpful.
HUX 572 - Key Periods and Movements, Philosophy: The Biblical Movement (3)
An examination of modern scholarship on the Bible and it impact on Christianity; analysis of three types of Bible interpretation: fundamentalism, liberalism, and humanism.
HUX 573 - Key Periods and Movements, Literature: Archetypal Criticism (3)
Exploration of a 20th century movement in literature, archetypal criticism, which focuses on recurrent patterns in literature and their analogies in folk tales, dream, ritual and myth.
HUX 574 - Key Periods and Movements, History: The Age of Revolution (3)
An examination of the French Revolution of 1789-1815 through the eyes of a historian and a novelist.
HUX 575 - Key Periods and Movements, Literature: 19th Century American Literature (3)
Prerequisite: HUX 502 is recommended. Studies in the American literary tradition focusing on classic fiction by Hawthorne, Twain, Howells, and James, writers who established the mainstream of our creative aesthetic. Their novels, exploring evil, guilt and sin, chronicle America's spiritual uncertainties and social turbulence.
HUX 576 - Key Periods and Movements, Art: Ancient Maya (3)
Prerequisites: HUX 501 and HUX 504 are recommended. An examination of the art and architecture of the Mayan civilization in Mesoamerica in the context of its history, mythology and archaeology.
HUX 578 - Key Periods and Movements, Literature: The Female Coming of Age in World Literature (3)
Prerequisite: HUX 502 is recommended. An examination of 20th century world literature by female authors writing on the theme of "coming of age." Through fiction and autobiography from diverse world cultures including France, China, South Africa, Vietnam and the U.S., a study of the influence of ethnic background and cultural traditions on the coming of age experience. Examines modern definitions of women and their survival and growth strategies. Critical analysis in a comparative literature and cultures framework with feminist perspectives.
HUX 579 - Key Periods and Movements, History: The Arab World (3)
Prerequisite: HUX 501 is recommended. Political and cultural history of the Arab World from the 7th century to the present. Consideration of historiographic problems such as the "Great Man," cycles, and the influence of ideas on events.
HUX 580 - THE ANCIENT NEAR EAST (3) 
Prerequisite:HUX 501 and 6 units of additional units in history, preferably including HUX 579.
Ancient Egyptian and Sumerian political and cultural history and their impact on later civilizations. Analysis of historical questions through study of artifacts, documents, inscriptions, and monuments.
HUX 581 - KEY PERIODS AND MOVEMENTS, PHILOSOPHY:
PHILOSOPHY AND POSTMODERNISM.
(3) 
Prerequisite:HUX 505 Defining the Humanities: Philosophy
Studies in contrasting meanings of postmodernism as that term has been applied to philosophy and the arts. Historical context is provided by reviewing the major characteristics of modernity and modernism in order to understand how postmodernity and postmodernism are importantly different.


PHASE II - INDEPENDENT STUDY

Contracts must be completed, approved and turned in before the first day of the term. See Creating an Independent Study for information about how to construct this course. See the Faculty list for a list of faculty specialties as a guide to who might be willing to mentor your study. Please bear in mind that your choice of independent study topic will be limited to the five disciplines represented in our program, and further by the topics in which our faculty have sufficient expertise to be willing to guide you.

HUX 594 - Independent Study (3)
Prerequisites: Consent of mentor and program coordinator. Individually designed, faculty-guided study of a topic in:

594A - Literature; 594B - History; 594C - Philosophy;
594D - Music; 594E - Art; 594F - Interdisciplinary Topics

Course may be repeated; no more than 30% (9 units) of Independent Study courses from the total requirement of 30 units may be applied towards degree.

HUX students may not take an Independent Study during their first trimester. Students who sign up for the HUX 594 and do not file a contract or do not have any contact with the Humanities External Degree office or faculty during the term will receive a "U" (Unauthorized Incomplete) for the course grade and will be required to repeat the course (at their additional expense).


PHASE III - FINAL THESIS OR PROJECT

See the Final Thesis/Project page for information about this phase of the HUX curriculum.

Contracts for 598 and 599 must be submitted initially to the HUX office by the following deadlines: February 1 for Summer term registration, May 1 for Fall, and October 1 for Spring. This allows time to locate an appropriate mentor (and committee in the case of 599).

HUX 598 - Final Project Proposal (1)
Prerequisites: Completion of Phases I and II, completion and approval of Advancement to Candidacy materials and an approved 598 contract.

This one-unit course helps students prepare for the Final Project and the course connected to it (HUX 599). Students are admitted to the course after defining an acceptable topic and gaining a proposal mentor from among the faculty. During the course they work with a mentor to analyze and refine their topic and its scope. Frequently they will explore the current state of research by scholars on their topic, but course requirements are determined by the faculty mentor in conjunction with the student.

Please bear in mind that your choice of final project topic will be limited to the five disciplines represented in our program, and further by the topics in which our faculty have sufficient expertise to be willing to guide you. You may well have to change partially or completely your original idea in order to secure a faculty mentor.

The course must be taken and completed with at least a grade of "B" (up to two attempts are allowed) before a student will be allowed to register for the HUX 599: Final Project.

Students must register for HUX 598 at least one term before the registration for the Final Project. Once registered, a Final Project proposal (topic, outline and initial bibliography) must be sent to the Academic Coordinator, who will assign the approved topic to an appropriate HUX faculty member. Upon completion of the Proposal course, and approval of the 599 Contract (including agreement by three faculty committee members), students will be accepted to register for the HUX 599: Final Project course. This course can be from four to six units in length as determined at the time students advance to candidacy.

NOTE: Students who began the HUX program prior to Fall, 1998 are not required to take HUX 598.

HUX 599 - Final Project (4-6)
Prerequisites: Completion of Phases I and II, Advancement to Candidacy materials, completion of the 598 Proposal course and an approved 599 contract with the consent of final project committee and program coordinator. An individually-planned project based on coursework taken in the program and involving basic research in a single discipline or on an interdisciplinary topic in one of the following manners:

Thesis - 599A
The Thesis Project is the written product of a systematic study of a significant problem which follows the research process. It identifies the problem, states the major assumption, explains the significance of the undertaking, sets forth the sources for and methods of gathering information, surveys the current state of research related to that problem, analyzes the data, and offers a conclusion or recommendation. The finished product shows originality, critical and independent thinking, appropriate organization and format, and thorough documentation through primary and secondary sources, footnotes/endnotes and bibliography. The Thesis displays critical thinking in the form of a well-researched and developed point of view, proof of hypothesis or thesis, or an elaboration of already published materials. The paper must have thoughtful and complete development and proof of one basic thesis or idea. Thesis projects must be approved by a library approval committee before a final grade is granted.
Creative Project - 599B
The Creative Project involves areas such as painting, sculpture, graphic art; music compositions; poetry, novels; playwriting, screenwriting, and films. Creative Projects should be undertaken only by students who have an extensive background and/or an undergraduate degree in one of these areas, and who have continued to concentrate in this area in their HUX courses. Generally, the same presentation guidelines as Theses apply to Creative Projects.

The Final Project must be initially approved by the Program Coordinator before it is assigned to a mentor. All Final Projects are required to follow the "Instructions for the Preparation and Submission of Graduate Theses and Projects" from the Graduate Council and Office of Graduate Studies, California State University, Dominguez Hills (available through the University Bookstore), and the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers by Walter Achtert and Joseph Gibaldi. Students who sign up for the HUX 599 and do not file a contract or do not have any contact with the Humanities External Degree Program or faculty during the term will receive a "WU" (Unauthorized Incomplete) for the course grade and will be required to repeat the course.

Your choice of final project topic will be limited to the five disciplines represented in our program, and further by the topics in which our faculty have sufficient expertise to be willing to guide you. You may well have to change partially or completely your original idea in order to secure a faculty mentor and two additional committee members.



CONTINUOUS ATTENDANCE

HUX 600 - Graduate Continuation Course (0)
In Fall and Spring trimesters, all students must maintain continuous attendance, either by enrolling for classes or through enrollment in the Continuous Attendance option. This is also used when students have completed all course work but not the Final Project, or who have other requirements for the completion of their degree. Students need not register for summer classes to maintain continuous attendance.

More information on Continuous Attendance.


Undergraduate Courses for Nursing Students

Note: These courses are provided by HUX to the undergraduate Statewide Nursing Program at CSUDH. They are not available to HUX M.A. students.

HUX 346 - Alienation, Estrangement, and Subcultures

HUX 347 - Images of Humanity: World Religious Perspectives