Solubility Rules

Solubility Rules
Thanks to Professor Kenneth W. Busch from whose Web page these data were extracted.

1. Salts containing Group I elements are soluble (Li+, Na+, K+, Cs+, Rb+). Exceptions to this rule are rare. Salts containing the ammonium ion (NH4+) are also soluble.
2. Salts containing nitrate ion (NO3-) are generally soluble.
3. Salts containing Cl -, Br -, I - are generally soluble. Important exceptions to this rule are halide salts of Ag+, Pb2+, and (Hg2)2+. Thus, AgCl, PbBr2, and Hg2Cl2 are all insoluble.
4. Most silver salts are insoluble. AgNO3 and Ag(C2H3O2) are common soluble salts of silver; virtually anything else is insoluble.
5. Most sulfate salts are soluble. Important exceptions to this rule include BaSO4, PbSO4, Ag2SO4 and SrSO4 .
6. Most hydroxide salts are only slightly soluble. Hydroxide salts of Group I elements are soluble. Hydroxide salts of Group II elements (Ca, Sr, and Ba) are slightly soluble. Hydroxide salts of transition metals and Al3+ are insoluble. Thus, Fe(OH)3, Al(OH)3, Co(OH)2 are not soluble.
7. Most sulfides of transition metals are highly insoluble. Thus, CdS, FeS, ZnS, Ag2S are all insoluble. Arsenic, antimony, bismuth, and lead sulfides are also insoluble.
8. Carbonates are frequently insoluble. Group II carbonates (Ca, Sr, and Ba) are insoluble. Some other insoluble carbonates include FeCO3 and PbCO3.
9. Chromates are frequently insoluble. Examples: PbCrO4, BaCrO4
10. Phosphates are frequently insoluble. Examples: Ca3(PO4)2, Ag3PO4
11. Fluorides are frequently insoluble. Examples: BaF2, MgF2 PbF2.

This offering of solubility rules is in the public domain and may be copied without restriction. The user is encouraged to download it for private use and public distribution in any form, including that of making it available on other Web servers.

Send a message to Oliver Seely about this table? --> oseely@csudh.edu

  • Back to Oliver's home page
  • Link to the Chemistry home page
  • Click on this Erlenmeyer flask to go to the top of our server.