ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE

 

 

                        ADMINISTRATION AND OPERATIONS

 


PM 00-03                                                                                                                  7/21/00

President James E. Lyons, Sr.

 

 

            Process for Assessment, Strategic Planning, and Resource Allocation

 

 

During the 1999-2000 academic year, Task Forces created as recommended by the Mission, Goals, and Directions Committee developed a systematic process linking the assessment of all university programs and activities to strategic planning and resource allocation.  Upon its completion by the joint task forces, the draft process was widely disseminated for review and comment.  The result was general campus concurrence and the recommendation of the Academic Senate to implement the process.  This PM articulates the new process and supersedes all previous PMs on planning and budgeting.

 

 

CSUDH Assessment, Planning, and Resource Allocation

 

Principles and Assumptions

·        Review and assessment of programs and determination of program priorities must guide resource allocation.

·        The process must be open, including widespread consultation.

·        The process must integrate program review and assessment with planning, budget development, and resource allocation.

·        Decision-makers must adhere to a University rather than a divisional perspective in determining recommendations to the President.

 

Key Bodies in the Process

·        The University Planning Council (UPC), established upon the recommendation of the Mission, Goals, and Directions Committee in 1999, includes representatives from all campus segments.  Its purpose is to advise the President concerning the University’s progress in fulfilling its mission and achieving its goals.  The UPC leads the campus in focusing on short- and long-term goals based on needs assessment, and assures that the process of strategic planning operates consistently and continuously throughout the campus.

·        The (new) University Budget Committee (UBC), created by this PM, includes representation from each division of the University.  The President will appoint members of the UBC in its initial year of operation after appropriate consultation. In subsequent years, members will be identified through divisional processes.  Members will be chosen, in part, on their ability to apply a University rather than a divisional perspective to their budget recommendations. 

 

The UBC will hear presentations from all divisions of the University

including summary review of programs in the division, assessment data,

plans for the division, recommended priorities, and projected resource

needs.  The UBC will come to a tentative agreement on recommendations

for programs and refer these recommendations to a subcommittee, the Resource Deployment Committee (RDC), for recommendations of specific resource allocations.

 

Upon receipt of the specific recommendations of the Resource

Deployment Committee, the University Budget Committee will

review to insure alignment with its program recommendations and send to

the President its recommendations for existing programs that should be

supported, existing programs that should be discontinued, new programs

that should be supported, and priorities for programs and for resource

allocation.

 

·        The Resource Deployment Committee is comprised of three to five members of the UBC who are familiar with the resources available to the university and able to understand how resources should be deployed to accomplish University programmatic goals and priorities.

 

·        Program Effectiveness Councils:  Each division of the University will form a council or committee charged with the responsibility of reviewing all divisional programs.  On-going assessment is an integral part of program review, which will incorporate assessment data in the modification of plans, goals, and strategies at each level.  The reviews also lead to recommendations as to programs to be supported or to be reduced or discontinued, new programs to be initiated, priorities in program planning, and resource needs of the division and its programs.

 

During the first year of implementation of this process, the University Planning Council will engage in continuous evaluation and will make recommendations for modification of the process as appropriate.  These recommendations will be submitted to the President for his consideration and for widespread campus consultation.  Approved modifications will be implemented as feasible. Implementation calendars will be issued as appropriate.

 


PM 93-01                                                                                                                2/12/93

President Robert C. Detweiler

 

 

Bake Sale and Food Sale Policy

 

 

Introduction

 

The following policy has been adopted by the University in order to ensure compliance with health regulations related to preparation, storage and serving of food items, to minimize potential liability and to ensure compliance with the food service contract which grants exclusivity to the food services contractor.  This policy is subject to review and modifications as necessary to ensure compliance with the food services contractor and health regulations.

 

This policy applies to all recognized campus organizations interested in the sale of certain foods for the purpose of raising money.

 

Objectives

 

The food protection measures, as outlined in the RULES GOVERNING FOOD SALES OR SERVICE, are intended to accomplish the following objectives:

 

  1. Allow for strict observance of personal hygiene by all food service participants.

 

  1. Keep potentially hazardous food refrigerated and/or heated at all times to prevent the growth of any pathogenic organism which may be present.

 

  1. Apply good sanitation practices in the storage, preparation, display and service of food in order to comply with the California Uniform Food Facilities Regulations.

 

  1. Supervise cooking of certain foods of animal origin to insure the destruction of pathogenic organisms which may be present.

 

  1. Provide for adequate equipment and facilities for the proper conduct of operations.

 

  1. Protect against any accidental contamination of the food by any toxic substance.

 

  1. Place responsibility for observing the rules and regulations with the advisor/sponsor for the organization.

 

  1. Insure proper cleaning and sanitation of serving utensils, dishes and/or pans.

 

POLICY STATEMENT

 

Organizations which are interested in having a bake/food sale for the purpose of raising money may be allowed to sell food pending completion and approval of the Request for Bake/Food Sales On Campus form.  Such activity may not take place without the approval of the Office of the Director of the Loker University Student Union and the Office of the Executive Director of the Foundation.

 

In order to ensure the same opportunity be given to all interested groups, organizations wishing to have regularly scheduled bake/food sales may do so no more than two (2) times per month.  Depending upon the number of organizations, the Director of the University Student Union has the authority to further limit the number of or allow additional bake/food sales by an individual student group.

 

No more than two (2) bake/food sales will be permitted per day.

 

PROCEDURES

 

  1. The rules and the appropriate form will be obtained at The Office of Activities in the Loker Student Union and space for your event can be reserved at that time.

 

  1. The appropriate form will be completed in triplicate and signed by the advisor/sponsor prior to submission to the University Student Union according to the time frames stated on the form.

 

  1. A permit to operate will be issued to the applicant after review by the University Student Union.

 

  1. The permit must be available for display at the location of the sale or service.

 

  1. The advisor/sponsor will be responsible for the organization’s adherence to the rules in this policy.

 

  1. The Environmental Health and Occupational Safety Office will make a spot-check of food sales to ensue that all health provisions are being followed.

 

  1. No liability will be assumed by the University, the Loker University Student Union, the Foundation or the Dining Services Contractor for any food or drink the sponsoring organization provides.

 

  1. Any damages related to the function are the responsibility of the sponsoring organization.

 

  1. Food/bake sales will not be allowed in the University Student Union; exceptions will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

 

  1. Off-campus organizations are prohibited from dispensing food or drink on the Dominguez Hills University campus.

 

ORGANIZATIONS PLANNING BAKE/FOOD SALES ARE ENCOURAGED TO CONTACT CAMPUS DINING (X3814) TO PURCHASE FOOD AND BEVERAGE ITEMS.  SUCH ITEMS WILL BE MADE AVAILABLE AT COMPETITIVE PRICES.

California State University, Dominguez Hills

 

REQUEST FOR BAKE/FOOD SALES ON CAMPUS

 

THIS FORM MUST BE SUBMITTED TO THE OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE UNIVERSITY STUDENT UNION AT LEAST TWO WEEKS (10 DAYS) PRIOR TO EVENT

 

Name of sponsoring organization: ________________________________________________________

Date of event:______________________  Time: _____________________________________________

Campus location of service or sale: _______________________________________________________

Food items including condiments (be specific):_______________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________

Location where food will be prepared: _____________________________________________________

Storage of perishable food during transport:_____________________________________________

Methods of keeping hot foods hot/cold foods cold during service:

All foods must be maintained at a temperature of below 45 F degrees for cold foods

and 140 F degrees or above for hot foods.

 

*Non-perishable foods are:  Fruit pies, doughnuts, bread, cookies, candies, cakes without custard or whipped cream icing or filling, pretzels, soft drinks, punch, fresh or commercially canned fruit, and peanut butter.  Any food high in protein, such as milk and meat, is considered perishable and potentially hazardous.  DO NOT store or serve acid base foods such as punch, canned fruit, or fruit juices in galvanized containers because a poisonous by-product will be formed.

 

ORGANIZATION’S SPONSOR/ADVISOR:

Name:_______________________________________ Title:____________________________________

Department:__________________________________ Phone Number:____________________________

 

AGREEMENT:  For the privilege of selling foods on campus, the applicant organization agrees to comply with the rules governing food sales or service.  Failure to comply with the rules may result in loss of food selling or serving privileges and/or disciplinary action.  No liability will be assumed by the University, the Loker University Student Union, the Foundation or the Dining Services contractor for any food or drink the sponsoring organization provides.

                                                                                                _________________________________________

                                                                                                Signature of Organization Chairperson

______________                                                                               _________________________________________

Date submitted                                                                     Signature of Advisor/Sponsor

______________                                                                               _________________________________________

Date approved                                                                      Loker University Student Union

_____________                                                                  _________________________________________

Date approved                                                                      CSU, Dominguez Hills Foundation

 

 

 

This request when approved by University Student Union and the Foundation in conjunction with the approved vendor permit will serve as a permit to operate.  Please keep this available at the sales location.

 

 

California State University, Dominguez Hills

 

RULES GOVERNING FOOD SALES OR SERVICE

 

1.         Temperature Control

           

            Adequate facilities must be provided for keeping cold foods below 45 F degrees

and hot foods at 140 F degrees or hotter at all times.

 

2.         Food Protection

 

            Provisions must be made for protecting foods from dust or other contamination

during transport, storage, and service by use of covers, plastic wrap, or other

suitable utensils.  Persons serving foods must have clean hands, clean outer

garments, and not suffer from respiratory, gastrointestinal, or skin infections and

are required to wear plastic disposable gloves.  Plates, cups, and eating utensils

must be single service.  Soft drinks or punch must be served from original

containers or dispensing equipment approved by the Environmental Health and

Occupational Safety Office.

 

3.         Sanitation

 

Adequate trash cans must be provided for disposal of waste materials.  The area surrounding the food service must be kept clean at all times and left in a clean condition at the conclusion of each day’s service.

 

4.         Sales or Service Period

 

Food sales or service is limited to two (2) consecutive days.  Unusual circumstances will be considered on an individual basis.

 

5.         All food permits approved by the University Student Union office must be maintained at the sale or service location.

 

6.         Use of Dining Services kitchens or equipment is strictly prohibited

 

7.         Cleanup of all food and drink and related items is the responsibility of the sponsoring organization.  Failure to do so will result in appropriate cleanup charges.

 


PM 90-03                                                                                                                  3/19/90

President Robert C. Detweiler

 

 

Campus Catering Policy

 

 

The University’s food service contractor operates under a contract with the Foundation.  As is common in most campus food service agreements, the food service contractor is granted exclusive rights to provide food services on our campus.  It is imperative that the Foundation and the campus honor the commitment in the contract.

 

It is University policy that any catering activities held on campus must be provided by the Foundation’s food service contractor (currently Service America, Inc.).  It is the responsibility of the Foundation to ensure that quality food and service are provided at fair prices by this contractor.  Questions regarding this policy or requests for exemptions due to special circumstances, as well as suggestions for improved service, should be addressed to the Director of the foundation, Jacqueline Sells* (extension 3306).

 

Thank you for your cooperation.

*Currently, Kent Gibson, Executive Director of the CSUDH Foundation, ex. 3306.

 


PM 81-23                                                                                                                 11/10/81

Vice President David J. Karber

 

 

Policy and Procedures for Chargebacks

 

 

[Some time ago the Resource Administration Group drafted a proposal concerning the policies and procedures that are to be followed for the initiation and operation of chargebacks.  This proposal has been reviewed and is hereby approved.  It is effective immediately.  The following chargebacks have been in effect and may remain in effect but will be subject to review during the current year as provided in the policy:

 

1.      Materials costs in the Reproduction Center.

2.      Per impression charge for all Xerox copies.

3.      Servicing of office equipment by GSA.

4.      Supplies and forms from campus stores.

5.      Repair parts for departmental-owned vehicles.

6.      Construction/remodeling costs (initiated by unit).

7.      Telephone and postage for projects funded in independent operations.

8.      Overtime for off-campus groups.

 

Please inform the appropriate people in your unit of this newly-established policy.]

 

 

INTRODUCTION

 

            Units on campus receive resources to operate programs and provide services which are a part of their responsibility.  In some instances, resources are provided to units in order that they can provide materials and/or services to other units.  In addition, some units have been a “clearinghouse” for the centralized purchase of goods and services.  In some cases, the cost of these items has been billed to the units using them.  In other instances, they have simply been provided by the unit responsible for the centralized acquisition.

 

            The policies and procedures which follow are to inform the method by which decisions are made concerning the providing of services or the purchase of materials centrally and whether or not the costs should be billed to the various units.

 

DEFINITION

 

            A chargeback is defined as the billing to individual units within the University for the materials and/or services which they use which have been provided by another unit.

 

POLICIES

 

       1.  As a basic principle, chargebacks should be viewed as a cost control

mechanism, not as a means for increasing the operating expense budgets

of units that provide a service (service provider).

 

       2.  A chargeback may be instituted only when the costs are incurred at the

discretion of the receiving unit.

 

3.   A chargeback should be considered where it is important to have the locus of

budget responsibility with the unit administrator.  In these cases, expenditures are

at the discretion of the unit administrator and the “point of control” of costs

should reside with that administrator.

 

      4.   The chargeback should represent the direct cost of the materials and/or labor

      provided.

 

5.  A chargeback may be instituted when it is cost-effective; i.e., the benefits

     outweigh the costs.

 

6.  A chargeback may be instituted only for non-routine services not provided for in

     the budgets of service providers.

 

     7.   An established chargeback may be waived for services that are of primary value to

           the University as a whole.

 

8.  When chargebacks are instituted, recognition of these costs should be provided in 

     the budgets of the units to be charged.  The costs to be included and excluded in

     the chargeback should be clearly identified.

 

     9.  Service-providers will report chargebacks to cost centers on a timely basis.

 

PROCEDURES

 

     1.  Chargebacks must be approved in advance of their implementation.  In order to

          make appropriate adjustments within budgets, new chargebacks will only become

          effective at the beginning of a fiscal year.

 

     2.  If a unit providing materials or services proposes a chargeback the following 

          procedure must be followed:

 

a.       A preliminary assessment must be made by the proposing unit to determine whether or not the chargeback merits consideration under the policies outlined above.

 

b.      A proposal must be submitted to the Resources Administration Group (RAG)* and must set out the rationale which justifies the request and must include information concerning costs which justify the charges proposed.  A listing of the various charges for materials and/or labor to be provided must be included in the proposal.

 

c.       RAG* will review the proposal and will make a recommendation concerning it to the Vice President, Operations.

 

d.      The Vice President, Operations, will consult with other appropriate bodies and the final decision will be made by the President.

 

     3.    Proposed changes in approved chargeback fees, except for minor adjustments to

            reflect fluctuations in material and labor costs, must be submitted through the

            approval process outlined above.

 

     4.    RAG* will annually review campus chargebacks and may, after consultation with

the appropriate units, recommend that changes be made in chargebacks or that

individual chargebacks be eliminated.  This review will occur prior to the time

that budget allocations are made so that any changes in chargebacks can be

considered in the normal process of developing allocations.

 

*Currently, the Chargeback Committee

 


PM 89-07                                                                                                               7/27/89

President John A. Brownell

 

 

University Energy Conservation Policy

[Supersedes PM 86-03]

 

California State University Dominguez Hills

Energy Conservation and Building Temperature Control Policy

 

 

The Federal Emergency Building temperature restrictions regulations, effective as of July 16, 1979, place restrictions on temperatures for heating, cooling and domestic hot water in commercial, industrial, government and other nonresidential buildings.  The regulations generally require the thermostat be set no lower than 78 degrees Fahrenheit for cooling, no higher than 68 degrees Fahrenheit for heating and no higher than 115 degrees Fahrenheit for domestic hot water.  The regulations also require room temperature set backs during periods when buildings are unoccupied.  In response to these regulations and other continuing State and CSU mandates to conserve energy the following guidelines for building temperature control will be followed in all CSUDH buildings:

 

  1. People should expect temperatures which are regularly between 68 degrees Fahrenheit and 78 degrees Fahrenheit and dress accordingly.
  2. Personnel working or teaching in rooms which are regularly colder than 68 degrees Fahrenheit, hotter than 78 degrees Fahrenheit, or who have chronic problems with drafts or stagnant air should report it, in writing, to Physical Plant.  Physical Plant will attempt to adjust the air conditioning or make other modifications to correct the problem.
  3. No space heaters, whether state-owned or personal property, will be authorized for campus use unless a statement, approved by Physical Plant, is on file in the Physical Plant Office indicating that such equipment is necessary to maintain a temperature of 68 degrees Fahrenheit.
  4. In accordance with Department of Energy Regulations, heating and air conditioning systems must be turned off while buildings are unoccupied.  This is normally between the hours of 10 p.m. and 7 a.m., Monday through Friday and all hours of Saturday, Sunday and holidays.  Exceptions to these regulations should be requested, in writing, by the cognizant administrator and forwarded to the Director of Physical Plant.
  5. All windows in buildings that are air conditioned will remain closed and as secure as possible to prevent loss of conditioned air.
  6. Use of refrigerators for non-instructional purposes should be consistent with good energy management practices.  In order to discourage proliferation of personal refrigerators, approval for operation of such must be obtained from the Director of Physical Plant.
  7. Exemptions to this policy include, but are not limited to, maintaining laboratory plants or animal life; operation of data processing or other equipment which is temperature sensitive, storage of food or other perishables; and preservation of archives, books, art works or specimen.  Written request for exemptions should be sent by the cognizant administrator to the Director of Physical Plant

We realize that implementation of the attached building temperature control policy will change environmental and physical comfort conditions in many, if not all, of the buildings on campus.  Physical Plant will respond as quickly as possible to adjust air conditioning and heating systems which are not providing temperatures within the 68 degree Fahrenheit to 78 degrees Fahrenheit restrictions mandated by the Federal Department of Energy Regulations.  In most buildings heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems were not designed to accommodate these temperature restrictions.  This is further complicated by numerous changes in building space and room usage over the years, making it almost impossible to maintain original design conditions.  We hope all members of the campus community will cooperate as together we endeavor to achieve and maintain the goals of the Federal Building Temperatures Regulations.

 

*  *  *  *  *

Lighting Control Policy

 

  1. Artificial lighting is to be used only when natural light is insufficient to perform 

required function, or where the safety of the campus community is compromised.

 

  1. When artificial lighting is required, the following standard guidelines are to be followed:

 

    1. Use the minimum amount of light required to perform the required tasks comfortably.  The attached table indicates the desired level of illuminance [sic] that the University will attempt to provide.  Physical Plant will consult with facility users in the adjustment of lighting levels.
    2. Purely decorative lighting will be eliminated.  Lighting for special events will be approved on an event-by-event basis.
    3. Artificial lighting will be used only when areas are occupied.  Whenever a room is unoccupied, the lights are to be switched off.  This practice should be followed even if the room is unoccupied only for a few minutes.
    4. When specifying new light fixtures and lamps, care will be taken to order the most energy efficient light source appropriate for the intended application.

 

It should be noted that energy efficient lighting should not detract from the

esthetic value currently provided by lighting throughout the University.  In most

instances, it will be possible to provide more energy efficient lighting that also

provides better quality illumination.

 

Recommendations for Illuminance [sic]

 

            Type of Activity                                                     Lighting Levels  Footcandles           

 

Classrooms & General Offices                                             50 +/- 20%

Specialized Labs, Data Processing                                                   75 +/- 20%

Drafting                                                                                          100 +/- 20%

Work areas infrequently used (e.g., storage)                                      15 +/- 20%

Public Areas (e.g., hallways, etc.)                                                        5 +/- 20%

Parking                                                                                   1 +/- 20%

 

 


PM 00-02                                                                                                                    6/5/00

President James E. Lyons, Sr.

 

 

Goals and Objectives

 

 

These goals and objectives accompany the university mission statement “PM 2000-01.”

 

Achieving the university mission is an ongoing process and provides a framework for actions .  Fundamental to these goals and objectives are a focus on student success, a commitment to hiring and retaining highly qualified faculty who will provide the necessary instruction and guidance, and a pledge to function as a communiversity that places emphasis on cooperative efforts which benefit the community and its people through meeting their educational and cultural needs and building economic and social partnerships.  We seek to achieve our mission by planning, implementing, assessing, and revising the goals and objectives itemized below.

 

1.      Goal:  We will improve institutional effectiveness by building an infrastructure to facilitate planned growth.

 

 

A.  ensure that all units within the University address the academic and

      support needs of our constituencies;

 

B.     develop practices that recognize the value and roles of all members of the campus community;

 

C.     employ planning practices that incorporate clear priorities as well as budget and cost considerations;

 

D.     develop programs of excellence by expanding existing programs and creating new ones so as to make CSUDH a campus of first choice for new students;

 

E.      expand our efforts to acquire extramural funding through effective development practices consistent with both campus and system expectations;

 

F.      include in our strategic planning process provisions ensuring that the University meets the standards for regional institutional accreditation as well as national professional accreditation for degree programs in fields where recognized national professional accrediting bodies exist; and

 

G.     support our infrastructure with technology that is widely available, readily usable, and fully integrated.

 

  1. Goal:  We will facilitate access to higher education for postsecondary learners and will offer instructional programs and services at times and places accessible to the population we serve, including programs on-campus, off-campus, and at sites served by state-of-the-art technologies.

 

 

A.  provide outreach to high schools and community colleges, including  

            activities that facilitate student progress from high school through

            college and demonstrate the value of education as a key to career and

personal fulfillment;

 

B.     offer programs and services that meet the needs of working adult learners as well as traditional college-age students;

 

C.     offer programs that emphasize relationships with economic and industry clusters within our community;

 

D.     regularly survey our alumni to assess our programs and to maintain contact with them;

 

E.      regularly assess our scheduling practices in order to improve our academic calendar and class schedule; and

 

F.      offer distance learning via media such as computer network and video to ensure the broadest participation of learners transcending barriers of age, gender, or ethnicity.

 

  1. Goal:  We will support and strengthen academic programs encompassing the professions as well as the liberal arts and sciences in order to meet the learning needs and objectives of our students.

 

 

A.  regularly review instructional programs and courses at both the

      graduate and undergraduate levels;

                       

B.     provide clear, measurable learning outcomes for all academic programs and courses;

 

C.     assess student learning using data from program reviews and learning outcomes assessment for continuous program and instructional improvement; and

 

D.     provide support to enable the infusion of technological skills throughout our teaching and learning.

 

  1. Goal:  We will continue to undertake the education of teachers as a university-wide commitment in keeping with our responsibility to meet economic and social needs.

 

 

A.  create and sustain blended programs that facilitate graduation within

      four years with both a bachelor’s degree and a credential; and

 

B.     increase outreach to middle and high schools to motivate students to consider careers in teaching; work with school districts to advance current district employees along the career ladder to clear teaching credentials; create and expand collaborative relations with school districts and community colleges to foster the preparation of future teachers; and work collaboratively with school districts to provide in-service training for current teachers.

 

  1. Goal:  We will offer a broad spectrum of courses, programs, and student services to provide students with the knowledge and skills that promote career development and foster lifelong learning.

 

 

A.  maintain strong programs that provide the skills for lifelong learning,

      including those of technological literacy;

 

B.     introduce, modify, or eliminate courses, programs, and services to meet the long-term educational needs of the community, business, industry, and professions; and

 

C.     utilize a wide range of technologies including video and Internet to provide members of the community, business, industry, and professions with the greatest possible access to educational and training programs.

 

  1. Goal:  We will take full advantage of our cultural and demographic diversity as a dimension of our students’ learning.

 

A.  develop academic programs and support services that serve our multi-

      cultural, multi-ethnic student body;

 

B.     build a faculty and staff of appropriate diversity;

 

C.     encourage participation of our students and faculty in international programs, including the CSU International Program; and

 

D.     provide university-to-university student and faculty exchange programs and seek to provide for international exchanges through becoming a Fulbright-designated campus.

 

  1. Goal:  We will pursue excellence in student achievement and instructional 

programs as well as supportive services for faculty, staff, and administration.

 

·        Objectives:  We will 

 

A.      provide for continuous improvement of instructional and support programs based on assessment by students and alumni and outcomes of development programs; 

 

B.     continue to hire and retain excellent faculty and staff; 

 

C.     commit to faculty and staff development, including professional

      advancement, technological support, and degree completion programs; 

 

D.     analyze student and alumni responses to improve the effectiveness of our learning environment; and 

 

E.      collect and apply data from students and employers to develop and strengthen our programs. 

 

  1. Goal:  We will encourage, support, and reward the teaching, research, scholarship

and creative activity of our faculty. 

 

·        Objectives:  We will 

 

A.     allocate University resources to support faculty research, scholarship, and creative activity; 

 

B.     recognize faculty achievement in the teaching and learning environment, including advising and scholarship of pedagogy; 

 

C.     pursue external funding from public and private sources for support of

      excellence in teaching, research, and creative activities; and 

 

D.     provide maintenance and continuous upgrade of equipment and facilities supporting faculty activities. 

 

9.   Goal:  We will form interactive partnerships in the public and private sectors to

generate research findings and strengthen the communities we serve. 

 

·        Objectives:  We will 

 

A.     encourage and support faculty in the pursuit of research projects in the

            public and private sectors; 

 

B.     encourage university-community collaboration in the formation and

implementation of public policy; 

 

C.     actively support community economic and service organizations; and 

 

D.     generate research findings through our interaction with the community to shape and inform student learning and curricular design and establish focus groups within our surrounding communities to assess their needs and consequent impact on the activities of the University. 

 

10.   Goal:  We will foster campus-wide collaboration in learning, including expanded

        opportunities for students to gain experience beyond the University, as an integral

        part of their academic careers. 

 

·        Objectives:  We will 

 

A.     foster service learning programs, cooperative education, internship programs, and alumni mentoring program opportunities for our students; 

 

B.     reward collaborative research between faculty and students by providing support and time for research and faculty supervision; and 

 

C.     encourage co-curricular learning experiences through the support of the Associated Students, Inc. (ASI) and other student-related groups. 

 

11. Goal:  We will strengthen our fiscal position and align our allocation of resources in

      support of the University’s mission and goals. 

 

·        Objectives:  We will

 

A.  improve efficiency and strengthen prudent management of the   

      University’s resources;

 

B.     regularly assess the linkage between planning and resource allocation

to ensure appropriate support of the University’s priorities;

 

C.     require a fiscal analysis (revenues and expenditures, cost implications

for new programs, and the like) as part of unit and program reviews; use these data in making decisions about reallocation of funds and the need to strengthen, consolidate, or, when warranted, eliminate academic and support services programs;

                       

D.     enhance efforts to acquire significant external support through

planning, conducting, and evaluating a major capital campaign to

begin in academic year 2000-01; and

                       

E.      annually analyze, disseminate, and apply our assessment data to

improve and refine our planning, budgeting, allocation, and fund-

raising processes.

 

12.  Goal:  We will provide quality, constituent-friendly services that enhance the    

teaching and learning environment and maintain the administrative integrity of the University.

 

·        Objectives:  We will 

 

A.     provide an aesthetically pleasing and safe teaching and learning work

      environment; 

 

B.     provide guidance, services, and support for employee development, employee benefit programs, and other functions related to employment at the University; 

 

C.     provide a framework that improves communication and information flow to the campus community and, thereby, ensures the integrity of the University; 

 

D.     maintain and enhance the University’s physical infrastructure; and 

 

E.      develop a support structure for state-of-the-art technology by ongoing

acquisition of hardware, software, and appropriate training.

 


PM 82-23                                                                                                                  8/3/82

David J. Karber, Vice President, Operations

 

 

Key Control Policy and Procedures (Revised)

Preface

 

Access to facilities is obviously essential to the smooth operation of this university, but this access also implies an equally critical concern for the security and integrity of those facilities and their contents.  Integral to both concerns are a well-defined and workable key issuance and control policy and the necessary procedures to implement and enforce it.

 

The need for such a formal, codified key control policy for CSUDH, which encompasses both but compromises neither the access nor security requirements of the campus community, has long been recognized.  This need is now critical due to the growth in terms of size and complexity of our operations and to the economic reality of increasing fiscal constraints which may impair our ability to replace or repair assets on a timely basis.  Moreover, as a state-supported institution, CSUDH recognizes its commitment to the preservation and protection of its assets and to the maintenance of confidentiality of certain records and documents held in public trust.

 

The foregoing needs, concerns, and impacts have provided the framework and rationale for the key control policy and procedures which follow.

 

Policy and Procedures

 

1.                  General

 

It shall be the policy of this university to permit access to its facilities only to eligible employees based on a rationale of need and justification in order to preserve and secure its assets and confidential records.  The issuance of keys and their control are thus central to the attainment of these objectives.

 

2.                  Types of Keys Issued

 

a.       Great Grand Master:  The issuance of Great Grand Masters (GGM) shall  

be tightly controlled to improve and maintain campus-wide security.  The

 loss or theft of this key, which permits access to the total complex (with

some exceptions), would seriously undermine the security and safety of

this institution.  Therefore, any request for a GGM key must contain a

statement of justification signed by the appropriate Dean or Administrator. 

The request shall then be reviewed and approved by the Vice President for

Operations*.

 

*Current title is Vice President for Administration and Finance

b.      Grand Building and Sub-Building Masters:  The issuance of these keys shall be based upon demonstrable need and justification due to the wide access provided by them.  The loss or theft of these keys, although not as serious as that of the GGM, nevertheless carries great security implications.  Thus, requests for these keys must also be accompanied by a statement of justification signed by the appropriate Dean or Administrative Officer and shall be reviewed and approved by the Director of Plant Operations.  In general, distribution of these keys shall be limited to appropriate administrative personnel.

 

c.       Building Entrances:  Keys to building entrances may be issued to full and part-time faculty and staff at the request and approval of appropriate Deans and Directors.

 

d.      Offices/Classrooms/Furniture:  Same as “building entrances.”  (The “furniture” category includes keys to such items as desks, file cabinets, storage equipment, and other miscellaneous items.  This type of key must also be requested on the standard key request form.)

 

3.                  Issuance of Keys

 

a.       Deans and Administrative Officers shall systematically review and approve (sign) all requests for keys to areas under their purview prior to submission to Plant Operations.  All requests for keys shall be made via “Key Request Form BA  0024 (rev. 7/82)” available through the university warehouse. 

 

b.      Requests for Great Grand Master Keys:  Requests for GGM keys shall be reviewed and approved by the Vice President for Operations*.  Each request must be made on the standard “Key Request Form BA 0024 (rev. 7/82)” and must also contain a statement of justification signed by the appropriate Dean or Administrator.  This authority is not to be delegated.  The request and justification are to be forwarded directly to the Vice President for Operations* for review and approval.

 

c.       In order to provide continuity and systematic control, requests for all keys other than the GGM shall be reviewed and approved by the Director of Plant Operations whose decision shall be based on need and security considerations.  In the event of a disagreement, an appeal may be made to the Director of Business Affairs.**

 

d.      Students, including student assistants, shall not be issued keys.  Exceptions shall be made, however, in those instances of demonstrable

 

* Current title is Vice President, Administration and Finance

** Current title is Associate Vice President, Administration and Finance

need when approved by the appropriate Dean.  The standard “Key Request

Form BA 0024 (rev. 7/82)” must contain a statement of justification and

must be approved (signed) by the Dean of the School.  The request is to be

forwarded to the Director of Plant Operations.  Upon approval, the student

will be issued a key provided that he/she posts a $10.00 refundable deposit

for each key requested at the Cashier’s Office (Small College B135).  The

student must then take the cashier’s receipt to Public Safety (Small

College A122) for key issuance.  Keys will be issued for the current

academic year and students must return them to Plant Operations within

ten days after the last day of final examinations for the spring quarter*. 

Keys returned after this deadline will be subject to a $3.00 late fine.

 

e.       Keys may also be issued to contractors working on special university projects at the discretion of the Director of Plant Operations.  In such instances, a contractor shall post a $50.00 refundable deposit at the Cashier’s Office for each key issued.

 

f.        The individual to whom keys are issued by Plant Operations shall be responsible for any fines or fees imposed for failure to return keys or for the costs incurred to replace or duplicate lost or stolen keys.

 

4.                  Lost/Stolen Keys

Lost or stolen keys must be reported immediately to Public Safety which will require a signed statement from the responsible party.  A replacement fee of $10.00 for each key lost or stolen must be paid by the responsible party at the Cashier’s Office prior to issuance of a replacement(s).  Requests for replacements must be made on a Key Request Form to Plant Operations.  No charge shall be levied for replacing broken keys when all parts are returned to Plant Operations.

 

5.                  Key Distribution

After approval of a key request, the individual to whom the key is to be issued will be notified by Plant Operations and instructed to pick up keys at the Public Safety Office (Small College A122).  The individual must sign for receipt of each key issued.  (See Section 3d for Student Assistant procedures.)  In addition, the exchanging or loaning of keys between employees is prohibited.  An individual shall be issued only one key per lock at any given time.

 

6.                  Key Return

a.       All keys must be returned to the Plant Operations Department or to the Public Safety Department when no longer needed by the individual or as determined by the appropriate Administrative Officer.

 

 *Currently, semester.

b.      Termination or Transfer of Employment:  In the event of separation of employment from CSUDH, employees are required to return all keys issued to them to Plant Operations or to Public Safety.  Terminal paychecks will be withheld until keys have been returned or appropriate fines have been paid at the Cashier’s Office.  Compliance shall be monitored through the Personnel/Payroll Offices.

 

c.       Keys Returned through Public Safety:  Employees who choose to return keys through Public Safety will not be able to have their key records cleared immediately because all records are maintained at Plant Operations.  Public Safety will, however, forward returned keys on a daily basis, along with the following information:

1.      Employee name and Social Security Number.

2.      Date of key return.

3.      Number of keys returned by hook number.

4.      Checkout sheet for clearance by Plant Operations (if applicable).

Employees will be given a signed receipt by Public Safety which will include his/her name, date, and keys returned.

N.B.    If employees elect to return keys through Public Safety, key return should be the only remaining item on the termination checkout sheet because it will need to be forwarded first to Plant Operations for clearance and then routed directly to the Personnel/Payroll Offices.  For immediate clearance of key records, employees will need to return keys directly to Plant Operations.

 

7.                  Requests for Re-keying

Requests for re-keying locks shall be approved only in situations of extreme security risk.  Requests for re-keying of locks should be submitted for approval to the Director of Plant Operations on the standard “Work Order Request Form BA 0026 rev.7/82”.  In cases where re-keying is requested for departmental convenience or as a result of improper key security or negligence, the requesting department will be required to pay for the re-keying costs.  Plant Operations will work with the Public Safety Department in defining cases involving improper key security or negligence and in providing assistance to departments in establishing proper key security procedures.

 

8.                  Fee/Deposit Schedule

a.       Lost or Stolen Keys:  $10.00 for each key, to a maximum of $50.00 per occurrence.

b.      Re-keying Costs:  $15.00 for each lock re-keyed.

c.   Deposits:

1.      Student Assistants:  $10.00 for each key issued.

2.      Off-campus Contractors:  $50.00 for each key issued.

9.                  Key Duplication

Duplication of university keys by individuals other than university locksmiths is prohibited by law.

 

 


PM 85-03                                                                                                                  3/18/85

President Richard Butwell

 

 

Layoff Procedures

 

 

PM 79-05, with supplement, is not consistent with the several existing collective bargaining agreements and, therefore, is rescinded effective this date.

 


PM 00-01                                                                                                                  1/10/00

President James E. Lyons, Sr.

 

 

Mission

 

 

California State University, Dominguez Hills is a comprehensive urban university, located in the city of Carson and primarily serving the greater Los Angeles metropolitan area.  The University is a multi-cultural, multi-ethnic teaching and learning community dedicated to excellence and committed to educating a student population of unprecedented diversity for leadership roles in the global community of the 21st Century.  We invite international perspectives, cultivate programs that serve students from other nations, and encourage our students and faculty to participate in programs in other countries.  We are committed to excellence and pluralism in higher education to further the goals of a democratic society through wide participation and civic responsibility in community, social, and economic affairs.

 

California State University, Dominguez Hills realizes the principles of educational opportunity and excellence by providing access to a wide range of educational programs and student-centered services.  Building on its core of liberal arts and sciences, the university offers programs, in a variety of educational and technological modes, that enable students to develop intellectually, personally, and professionally.  These programs are offered at times and locations convenient for the students we serve.

 

California State University, Dominguez Hills pursues productive relationships with educational, public sector, and business communities by developing programs that address contemporary social concerns while fulfilling the University’s commitment to teaching and learning, research, scholarship, creative activity, and service.

 


PM 78-13                                                                                                                   5/17/78

President Donald R. Gerth

 

 

NON-DISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEXUAL PREFERENCE

 

A resolution adopted by the Staff Council was endorsed by the Academic Senate at its meeting on April 6, 1978.  I am approving the recommendation from these two bodies.  It is now the policy of California State University Dominguez Hills that no one shall be denied employment, retention or advancement on the basis of sexual preference/ orientation.

 


PM 93-02                                                                                                                  2/12/93

President Robert C. Detweiler

 

 

On-Campus Group Potlucks Policy

 

 

The following policy has been adopted by the University in order to ensure compliance with health regulations related to preparation, storage and serving of food items, to minimize potential liability and to ensure compliance with the food service contract which grants exclusivity to the food services contractor.

 

This policy applies to all faculty, students, staff and administrators interested in hosting a potluck in campus facilities, including but not limited to the Donald P. and Katherine B. Loker University Student Union.

 

POLICY STATEMENT

 

On-campus organizations planning closed social functions to which only on-campus individuals are invited (e.g. departmental and student clubs functions) in any campus facility, may be allowed to supply their own home-prepared food and drinks pending completion and approval of the Request for On-Campus Group Potluck Form.  All approvals must be obtained a minimum of two weeks prior to the proposed event.  Such events may not generate revenues of any kind and approval must be secured through the Office of the Director of the University Student Union and the Office of the Executive Director of the University Foundation.

 

Any open function (open to the general campus or public) and any on-campus business function must have all food and beverages catered through the Campus Dining Service.  Off-campus organizations are required to have all food and beverages catered by the Campus Dining Food Services.

 

This Policy Statement is not intended to apply to those campus group gatherings where each individual brings his/her own lunch, commonly referred to as “brown bag.”

 

**  Food prepared and served by the Campus Dining Services is exempt from the approval process outlined in this policy.

 

PROCEDURES

 

  1. The rules and the appropriate form will be obtained in the Office of Activities in the Loker University Student Union and space for your event can be reserved at that time.

 

  1. The appropriate form will be completed in triplicate and signed by the advisor/sponsor prior to submission to the University Student Union according to the time frames stated on the form.

 

  1. A permit to operate will be issued to the applicant after review by the University Student Union.

 

  1. The permit must be available for display at the location of the sale or service.

 

  1. The advisor/sponsor will be responsible for the organization’s adherence to the rules set forth by this policy.

 

  1. The Environmental Health and Occupational Safety Office will make a spot-check of food services to ensure that all health provisions are being followed.

 

  1. No liability will be assumed by the University, the Loker University Student Union, the Foundation or the Dining Services Contractor for any food or drink the sponsoring organization provides.

 

  1. Any damages related to the function are the responsibility of the sponsoring organization.

 

  1. For functions held in the University Student Union, an advance deposit for damages may be required at the discretion of the University Student Union Director.

 

  1. Off-campus organizations are prohibited from dispensing food or drink on the Dominguez Hills University Campus.

 

California State University, Dominguez Hills

 

 

REQUEST FOR ON-CAMPUS GROUP POTLUCK

 

THIS FORM MUST BE SUBMITTED TO THE OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE UNIVERSITY STUDENT UNION AT LEAST TWO WEEKS (10 DAYS) PRIOR TO EVENT

 

Name of sponsoring organization: _______________________________________________________________________

Date of event:______________________  Time: _______________________________

Campus location of service or sale: __________________________________________

Food items including condiments (be specific):_________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________

Location where food will be prepared: _______________________________________

Storage of perishable food during transport:__________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

 

All foods must be maintained at a temperature of below 45 F degrees for cold foods

and 140 F degrees or above for hot foods.

 

*Non-perishable foods are:  Fruit pies, doughnuts, bread, cookies, candies, cakes without custard or whipped cream icing or filling, pretzels, soft drinks, punch, fresh or commercially canned fruit, and peanut butter.  Any food high in protein, such as milk and meat, is considered perishable and potentially hazardous.  DO NOT store or serve acid base foods such as punch, canned fruit, or fruit juices in galvanized containers because a poisonous by-product will be formed.

 

CONDITIONS

 

All campus organizations wishing to have a potluck must comply with the following conditions to provide for the health and safety of the campus community:

 

Preparation:  Prevention of food infection or food poisoning is of primary concern.  High risk foods are those which are moist and high in protein, such as chicken, turkey, other meat and fish dishes, eggs and dairy products.  Custards, cream pies, and salads (such as potato, chicken, turkey, tuna) are also of concern.  Frozen meats should be thawed in the refrigerator, not in room temperature, and cooked immediately after thawing.  Cook thoroughly and use a meat thermometer for large roasts, turkeys, etc.  Before preparing, mixing or handling ingredients, and/or immediately after using restroom facilities, every person should wash his/her hands and arms thoroughly with soap or detergent and warm water and rinse them in clean water.  No person should prepare or serve food if he/she is likely to have a contagious disease or infection (e.g., cold).

 

 

 

Storage:  Food that is transported from where it has been prepared must be properly protected while in transit.  Food should be prepared as close as possible to the time of serving.  If perishables are prepared the night before, they are to be kept cold in a refrigerator, transported on ice, and kept cold until served or heated for serving.

 

Serving:  All perishable foods or beverages to be served cold are to be kept at or below 45 degrees Fahrenheit after preparation until served.  All perishable foods and beverages to be served hot are to be kept at or above 140 degrees Fahrenheit while being served.  No article of food or beverages which has been served previously to any person or returned from any table will be used in the preparation of other foods or beverages.  The serving area and all adjacent areas should be cleaned with soapy water or disinfectant and kept free of litter and rubbish at all times.

 

ORGANIZATION’S SPONSOR/ADVISOR:

 

Name:_____________________________________ Title: _______________________

 

Department:____________________________ Phone Number:__________________

 

AGREEMENT:  For the privilege of selling foods on campus, the applicant organization agrees to comply with the rules governing food or service.  Failure to comply with the rules may result in loss of food serving privileges and/or disciplinary action.  No liability will be assumed by the University, the Loker University Student Union, the Foundation or the Dining Services Contractor for any food or drink the sponsoring organization provides.

                                                                        _________________________________________

                                                                        Signature of Organization Chairperson

 

______________                                _________________________________________

Date submitted                                                 Signature of Advisor/Sponsor

 

______________                                _____________________________________

Date approved                                                 Loker University Student Union

 

_____________                                  _________________________________________

Date approved                                                 CSU, Dominguez Hills Foundation

 

 

 

This request when approved by University Student Union and the Foundation will serve as a permit to operate.  Please keep this available at the event location.

 

 

California State University, Dominguez Hills

 

RULES GOVERNING FOOD SERVICE

 

1.         Temperature Control

           

            Adequate facilities must be provided for keeping cold foods below 45 F degrees

and hot foods at 140 F degrees or hotter at all times.

 

2.         Food Protection

 

            Provisions must be made for protecting foods from dust or other contamination

during transport, storage, and service by use of covers, plastic wrap, or other

suitable utensils.  Persons serving foods must have clean hands, clean outer

garments, and not suffer from respiratory, gastrointestinal, or skin infections and

are required to wear plastic disposable gloves.  Plates, cups, and eating utensils

must be single service.  Soft drinks or punch must be served from original

containers or dispensing equipment approved by the Environmental Health and

Occupational Safety Office.

 

3.         Sanitation

 

Adequate trash cans must be provided for disposal of waste materials.  The area surrounding the food service must be kept clean at all times and left in a clean condition at the conclusion of each day’s service.

 

4.         Service Period

 

Food  service is limited to two (2) consecutive days.  Unusual circumstances will be considered on an individual basis.

 

5.         All food permits approved by the University Student Union office must be maintained at the service location.

 

6.         Use of Dining Services kitchens or equipment is strictly prohibited

 

7.         Cleanup of all food and drink and related items is the responsibility of the sponsoring organization.  Failure to do so will result in appropriate cleanup charges.

 


PM 96-03                                                                                                                    3/5/96

President Robert C. Detweiler

 

 

Policy for Scheduling of University Computer Labs

 

 

The university provides computer labs for its students as a resource to support the instructional program.  The university is committed to providing students with opportunities to develop computer-based skills necessary for their educational, professional and personal development.  The instructional program includes courses that teach computer skills directly as well as those that use computer-based instruction and activities to achieve understanding of the diverse subject matter in the curriculum.  The primary goal of the policy on computer lab scheduling is to maximize the availability of the resources of the labs for student use throughout the day, afternoon, evening, and weekend hours.  The policy outlined here is designed to maximize lab availability for drop-in use, as well as provide adequate opportunities for the instructional program to teach computer-based skills.

 

I.          Priority for Use of Computer Labs

 

Among the various constituencies who have made claims or requests for use of the computer labs over time, the following priorities shall be recognized.

 

A.  Courses required for degree programs and other regular university courses

(students/faculty)

B.   Instructional Computing Workshops

C.  Other “Special Sessions” courses (students/faculty)

D.  CAMS classes (students/faculty)

E.   Other Extension courses (students/faculty)

F.   Off-campus groups, even if the group is co-sponsored by a university unit.

 

II.        Definitions

 

      A.  “Term-long” use of a computer lab is assigned use for a scheduled class section

throughout an academic term.

 

       B.  “Ad hoc” use of a computer lab is assigned occasional use of a computer lab for a

scheduled class section.  Requests for use of a computer lab exceeding the equivalent of

six class sessions (1¼ hour modules) per term shall be considered “term-long” use.

 

       C. “Open hours” refers to assigned time blocks in which a computer lab is available to any

student on a “drop-in” basis.

 

       D. The Academic Computer Lab Access Committee (or ACLAC) shall be the

responsible body for implementing the lab scheduling policy and for resolving conflicts

over requests for use of the computer labs.  ACLAC will receive all requests for “term-

long” use and will review requests for formal exception to this policy.  ACLAC is

chaired by the Associate Vice President for Academic Planning who serves in an “ex-

officio” non-voting capacity.  Membership of ACLAC shall include two faculty

appointed by the Academic Senate, the campus Instructional Computing Coordinator, a

school/college Dean or Associate Dean and one student appointed in consultation with

ASI.  ACLAC makes recommendations to the Associate Vice President for Academic

Planning who shall make the final decisions on computer lab scheduling.

 

III.       Procedures for Scheduling Use of Computer Labs

 

Procedures for requesting “term-long,” “ad hoc,” and “open hours” use are outlined below.

 

A.        Provisions for “term-long” use:

 

1.  “Term-long” use shall be limited to those course sections that have

specific laboratory (L) or activity (A) components which have been approved

through the university curriculum process and which require in-class

computing experiences for achievement of student instructional goals. 

Provisions for a formal exception to this guideline are described in section

III.A.4.

 

2.  Only the laboratory or activity components of the course shall be

     scheduled into the computer lab for the term.

 

3.  Formal requests for “term-long” lab scheduling shall be made each term at

least two months prior to the deadline for submission of the class schedule for

that term to Academic Affairs.  The formal request shall describe the need for

lab access and document, through submission of the course syllabus or

assignment list, the ways in which the lab resources would be used.  These

requests shall be reviewed by the Academic Computer Lab Access

Committee (ACLAC).  ACLAC shall forward its recommendations to the

Associate Vice President for final decision.  Once a class has been approved

for “term-long” use, it shall not need to be re-approved each term.  An

approved course shall undergo periodic review by ACLAC every two years

to insure that lab access is still essential to the instructional goals of the

course.  Courses needing more frequent lab access than the parameters for

“ad hoc” but less than every class period fall into the category for “term-

long” use.

 

4.  The instructor of a class or the chairperson on behalf of all sections of a class

     may request a formal exception to the instructional mode (lab or activity

     sections only) restrictions in III.A.1.  The request must be submitted at least

     two months before the class schedule for that term is due to be submitted to

     Academic Affairs.  The written request for “exception” shall include a

     rationale with supporting documentation in the form of the proposed class

     syllabus, the explicit goals for the computer-learning experiences, and

     justification as to why the available alternative instructional modes are not

     appropriate.  The request must be reviewed and approved by the department

     chair or program coordinator and the dean of the school/college prior to

     submission to ACLAC.  ACLAC shall make its recommendation to the AVP

     Academic Planning who shall make the final decision.  Once approved,

     course “exceptions” shall not be required to undergo approval each term, but

     shall be subject to “periodic” review as mentioned in section III.A.3.  This

     provision for exception provides recognition of the varied instructional styles

     that faculty utilize and the need to encourage instructional innovation and

     experimentation unconstrained by the course classification system.

 

B.        Provisions for “ad hoc use:”

 

  1. Requests for the use of a specific computer lab for a specific class session shall

be made in writing.  These requests shall be received by the Instructional

Computing Supervisor by noon on Friday of the week preceding the requested

use.  The request should include a brief description of the intended instructional

outcomes.  This requirement allows lab staff to ensure that the appropriate

software or network access will be available in the requested lab before a

scheduling commitment is made.  Requests to use software not installed on the

server in the lab must be submitted at least two weeks in advance of the

requested use in order to assure that software needs may be met.

 

  2. Should the lab be fully scheduled and not able to accommodate the requested ad

hoc use, the instructor may contact the instructor of a “term-long” class

scheduled in the lab to see if an informal accommodation can be made.

 

  3. Requests for “ad hoc” use are not limited in any way by the course classification

designation, instructional mode, or topic of the class.  Instructional and non-

instructional computing workshops are considered “ad hoc” use.

 

4.   Off-campus groups may not schedule computer labs in the evening.  Weekend

use may not exceed four days per term, and may not be scheduled during the last

four weeks of any academic term.  This restriction is necessary to assure that

adequate lab use opportunities will be reserved for students during the hectic

“wind-up” to a term.

 

C.                 Provisions for Computer Lab “open hours:”

 

1. “Open hours” are periods of time spread throughout the different morning,

afternoon, evening and weekend modules during which a specific computer lab is

available only to individual students, faculty and staff for “drop-in” use.  No “ad

hoc” or “term-long” use shall be allowed during “open hours” for a specific lab. 

Access to stations is on a first-come, first-served basis.  Provisions for time

limitations on use by any individual during any one period may be implemented

should demand for the lab resource require rationing.  “Open hours” are

restricted to CSUDH students, faculty and staff.

 

 2.  The minimum number of weekly “open hours” for each lab shall be defined each

term before any reservations are made for “term-long” or “ad hoc” use.  The

amount of time reserved for open hours for each lab shall be determined by

ACLAC based on recommendations from instructional computing services.  The

time allotted for “open hours” shall reflect usage statistics from prior terms and

shall be adjusted during any term when demand requires it.  “Open hours” shall

be defined and posted for each specific lab.  Academic Affairs shall monitor

“open hours” use and may recommend adjustments where usage problems are

identified.

 

3.  “Open hours” shall be maximized during the last four weeks of each term to allow

students increased opportunity to complete term assignments.  “Ad hoc” use for

demonstrations, workshops, etc., shall be restricted to the first eleven weeks of

each semester.

 

IV  Conflict Resolution and Designation of Final Authority over Computer Labs.

 

The scheduling of the computer labs is the responsibility of the division of Academic Affairs.  The Academic Computer Lab Access Committee (ACLAC) shall serve as the body to recommend solutions to conflicts over computer lab use.  The committee shall make recommendations to the Associate Vice President for Academic Planning who shall make the final decision in any dispute.  The existence of this committee shall not, however, absolve faculty from first making an honest effort to resolve conflicting requests or needs in an informal fashion.  ACLAC shall be responsible for receiving input from the Academic Senate, ACAC, deans or other sources in regard to the operation of the computer lab policy.  ACLAC shall be responsible for recommending any changes in the policy that require consultation through the normal policy-making processes of the university.

 

V.  Identification of Other Approaches or Developments that May Enhance the Goals of the Computer Lab Access Policy

 

The eventual full implementation of the campus plan for LAN’s and network

access, especially the cabling of each classroom and lab, and improved access

            to campus computer resources from off-campus, can be expected to take some

pressure off of the scheduling of computer labs.  These developments may

empower faculty to integrate computing topics into their classes and reduce

the demand for scheduled class access to the labs.  Combined with increased

Internet access through the campus LAN’s and communications servers for

off-campus users this development may reduce the burden on the labs.  It is

assumed that as faculty and students achieve more convenient campus

computer or Internet access from their homes that more of their computing

needs will be met without increasing demand on the labs.

 

    VI.   Data Needs to Support a Computer Lab Access Policy.

 

In order for the computer lab policy to develop its own legitimacy and to

maintain its credibility over time, it is essential that accurate data be gathered.   

ACLAC will work with instructional computing services to develop the range

of needed data and review it once collected.  Data on “term-long” use, “ad 

hoc” use, and “drop-in” use is needed to fine-tune allocation strategies,

equipment and software replacement plans for the labs, staffing requirements,

and allocation of related institutional resources.  Additionally, the gathering of  

survey information assessing computer lab services from both student and

 


PM 99-07                                                                                                                 11/10/99; Revised 9/14/06

President James E. Lyons, Sr.

 

 

Establishment of the University Planning Council

 

 

Purpose of the University Planning Council

 

The UPC has been designed to

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHARGE TO THE UNIVERSITY PLANNING COUCNIL FOR ACADEMIC YEAR 1999-2000

 

My specific charge to the University Planning Council for the coming academic year is as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The UPC should report to the President at the end of each semester on activities relating to its charge, and at such times as matters should be brought to campus attention.

 

MEMBERSHIP OF THE UNIVERSITY PLANNING COUNCIL

 

The membership of the University Planning Council (UPC) is established as follows:

 

Chair:        President of the University

Co Chairs: Faculty member recommended by the Provost and Vice President

for Academic Affairs and appointed by the President

                 Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs or other Vice

President appointed by the President

 

Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs

Vice President for Administration and Finance

Vice President for Student Affairs

Vice President for University Advancement

Vice Provost for Academic Affairs

Executive Assistant to the President

Associate Vice President for Information Technology

Deans of the Six Colleges

Dean of the Library

Dean of Graduate Studies and Research

Dean of Undergraduate Studies

Chair or Vice Chair, Academic Senate

Chair, University Curriculum Committee

Chair, University Budget Committee

Co Chairs of WASC

Accreditation Liaison Officer, ex officio

Five faculty members elected by the Colleges of Business Administration and

Public Policy, Education, Health and Human Services, Liberal Arts, and

Natural and Behavioral Sciences

ASI President or designee

Staff Representative appointed by the President

Two individuals at-large appointed by the President

 

The term of appointment to the UPC of faculty representatives, faculty

committee chairs, the staff representative, and the at-large representatives

will be three years.  All other representatives will serve on UPC as a result of

their respective positions.

 

 

MEETINGS OF THE UNIVERSITY PLANNING COUNCIL

UPC should meet monthly during the academic year and may employ task groups and subcommittees as needed.  Agendas for UPC meetings should be sent to deans, directors, the chair of the Academic Senate, and the President of ASI, as well as to the UPC members.  Minutes of the meetings should be kept and distributed to members and other recipients of the agenda.

 

EVALUATION

Upon completion of the first year of UPC’s operation, the Vice Chairs shall evaluate the extent to which the UPC has met its purposes and fulfilled its charge.  The President of the University will review this evaluation and decide what modifications to the provisions of this Presidential Memorandum are warranted based on the findings which are presented to him.

 


PM 98-09                                                                                                                          8/28/98

President Herbert L. Carter

 

 

University Telephone Policy and Guidelines

as of August 1998

[Supersedes PM 94-04]

 

The mission of Telephone Services is to provide operation and maintenance of University voice communications in support of faculty, staff and students.  The scope of the responsibility includes provision and maintenance of campus office telephones, courtesy telephones and directories, public telephones, emergency telephone call boxes and revision and publication of an annual campus telephone directory.  The unit also prints and disseminates information on communications policies and procedures, equipment and usage.

 

The following is University policy regarding telephone services and the use of telephones.  The objective of these policies is to provide satisfactory customer service in a cost effective manner.

 

Personal Telephone Calls

 

The policy regarding personal calls placed over State telephones is consistent with the guidance and prohibitions set forth in State Administrative Manual 4525.8.  The policy provides that personal telephone calls must be billed to the caller’s home telephone or placed “collect;” personal telephone calls may not be placed over the State lines; and incoming and outgoing personal calls (even when billed to home telephones) must not interfere with the conduct of State business, or cause loss of personnel time.  Unit telephone bills will be provided by Telephone Services to unit supervisors for their review, comments, and appropriate action in the case of unauthorized uses of State telephones.

 

Collect Calls and Third Party Billed Calls

 

The acceptance of incoming collect calls is not authorized.  Any exceptions must be approved by unit supervisors, based on emergency requirements.  Third party charged calls (calls placed from an off-campus number to another off-campus number and billed to an existing University number) are not authorized.

 

Telephone Credit Card Guidelines

 

Telephone credit cards are to be used by employees on travel status or employees who frequently travel to work locations away from their home office.  Employees working from home should not normally charge business related calls to telephone credit cards, since this is not considered travel status.  Reimbursement will be handled via a personal voucher.  Every credit card call carries a 40 cent surcharge; therefore local calls (calls not further than 40 miles) should be placed via coin phones, to avoid excessive billing for local calls.

 

If your credit card is lost or stolen, report the loss or theft to Telephone Services at extension 3800 as soon as possible.  The card will be immediately canceled, and a new one reissued.  If you leave the University’s employment you must return the credit card and it will be immediately canceled.

 

International Telephone Calls and Facsimiles

 

All requests for approval of telephone calls, facsimiles or other communications outside the continental U.S. must be coordinated with Telephone Services.  Telephone Services will provide assistance in routing communications through the use of the most efficient and cost-effective means.

 

The usage cost for fax services is the responsibility of each department.  Departments have sole responsibility for purchasing and maintaining departmental fax machines.  Telephone Services is responsible for coordinating the installation of telephone lines for fax service.  Request for new telephone lines should be sent to Telephone Services and include an account number with an authorized signature to pay for usage.

 

Telephone Service Requests

 

Telephone Services has sole authorization to place orders for repairs, installations and changes to telephone service.  All requests must be forwarded to Telephone Services.  A letter of justification must accompany requests for new service.

 

Telephone Relocations

 

Convenience relocations necessitated by furniture rearrangement, etc., and additional features of a non-essential nature, i.e. longer phone cords, will be charged to the requesting department’s budget.  Adds, moves and changes associated with a remodeling project will also be charged to the requesting department’s budget.  A budget line item to cover telephone related charges must be included in the total cost of the project.  This can be accomplished by coordinating project with Telephone Services.  Grants, when appropriate, should also include a line item for Telephone Services (see Telephone Services, http://research.csudh.edu/telecomm/phone.htm, for Telecommunications Services Charges).  Relocation of telephones because of new building or University organizational changes will be made at University expense.

 

Whenever possible, department telephone numbers will be moved with the department upon relocation; however, relocation of faculty telephone numbers is not authorized.  Faculty will be provided a new telephone number at the new location.

 

Telephone Installations

 

Telephones will be installed and maintained at University expense in academic and administrative departments.  Telephones are provided and should be assigned only to regular employees of the unit.  The University will not normally provide telephones solely for the use of student assistants unless the student assistant’s primary function is operator or receptionist.  A maximum of one single line telephone will be installed in faculty offices and in most laboratories for emergency use only.  Additional telephone requests will be subject to a charge.

 

Telephones operating from the University system will be installed in various auxiliary units on campus but will be billed to those units.  This include operations under the jurisdiction of the Foundation, the Student Association or other organizations which are not fully state-supported.  Other University activities may also be billed, depending upon the source of funding.  For example, University projects funded for research, by grants or state lottery funds may be required to support their own telephone service charges.  The department responsible for charge back of such services must submit in writing authorization for charge back and provide an account number to be used for charge back of services.  Such departments must coordinate their telephone service requirements with Telephone Services.

 

Private Telephone and Communications Devices Purchase/Use

 

Employees may purchase and use a telephone of their choice if the set meets FCC and other regulations.  Most University lines are digital and only work with Intercom telephone sets.  Consequently, an analog line must be available to support the analog telephone.  Prior to purchase, the individual should consult with Telephone Services to insure compliance with regulations.  This applies to answering machines, fax devices and fax machines.  Equipment purchased by individuals with private funds for use with their University telephone service becomes the responsibility of the purchaser, including repair and maintenance of such equipment.

 

Telecommunications Device for the Deaf

 

The Office of Disabled Student Services is equipped with a Telecommunications Device for the Deaf (TDD).  All campus lines are TDD compatible but do not have the device required to handle such calls.  Contact Telephone Services if a TDD is necessary.

 

Threatening, Obscene or Harassing Telephone Calls

 

Threatening phone calls must be reported to Public Safety immediately.  Obscene or harassing phone calls should be reported to Telephone Services when received.  Threatening, obscene and harassing calls are prohibited by Federal and State laws.  Making or permitting such calls may result in a fine or imprisonment or both per Federal Communications Act, Section 223; California Penal Code, Section 653m.