PM 85-10

10/24/85

President Richard Butwell

 

 


Plagiarism


 

Upon the recommendation of the Academic Senate, I have approved a revision of the campus policy on plagiarism.  All members of the university community, including students, should use the revised policy as a guide.  Such activities as choreography and computer programming are now subject to the rules of plagiarism.  The new statement on plagiarism for the university catalog follows; it is effective immediately.

 

                        At the heart of any university are its efforts to encourage critical reading

skills, effective communication, and, above all, intellectual honesty among its

students.  Thus, all academic work submitted by a student as his or her own

should be in his or her own unique style, words, and form.  When work is

submitted that appears to be original, but actually is not, the student has

committed plagiarism.

 

            Plagiarism is considered a gross violation of the Universityís academic

and disciplinary standards.  Plagiarism includes the following:  copying of one

personís work by another and claiming it as his or her own, false presentation of

oneís self as the author or creator of a work, falsely taking credit for another

personís unique method of treatment or expression, falsely representing oneís self

as the source of ideas or expression, or the presentation of someone elseís

language, ideas, or works without giving that person due credit.  It is not limited

to written works.  For example, one can plagiarize music compositions,

photographs, works of art, choreography, computer programs, or any other unique

creative effort.

 

            Plagiarism is cause for formal University discipline and is justification for

an instructor to assign a lower grade or a failing grade in the course in which the

plagiarism is committed.  In addition, the University may impose its own

disciplinary measures.