Technophobia Measurement Instruments Information

"Computer Anxiety Rating Scale"

"Computer Thoughts Survey"

"General Attitudes Toward Computers Scale"


This page features sample questions from three measurement scales. These three instruments are appropriate for measuring anxiety, attitudes and thoughts/feelings about computers and all computerized technology. They each have a readability level of 10.0 and have been administered successfully in group sessions with children as young as 11 years old and adults of all ages.

 

CARS-C: Computer Anxiety Rating Scale

The Computer Anxiety Rating Scale (Form C) contains 20 items that measure technological anxiety on a five-point scale. This measurement instrument, and its predecessors, have been administered to thousands of university students, school teachers, secondary school students and business people throughout the United States and university students in 22 other countries.

CTS-C: Computer Thoughts Survey

The Computer Thoughts Survey (Form C) contains 20 items that measure specific thoughts and cognitions that people have when working with technology or when contemplating working with technology. Items are rated on the same five-point scale as the CARS-C and the measure has been administered to over 12,000 people in the United States and in 22 other countries.

GATCS-C: General Attitudes Toward Computers Scale

The General Attitudes Toward Computers Scale (Form C) contains 20 items that measure a variety of attitudes toward computers and technology on five-point Likert scales. This scale has been use with the same populations as the CARS and CTS in both the United States and abroad.

The Technophobia Measurement Package

Research by the authors and others has clearly demonstrated that the three measures provide a complete view of negative reactions to computers and computerized technology. In general, scores from the three measures are related, but only moderately. It is recommended that all three measures be used to provide a more comprehensive view of technophobia.

The Technophobia Measurement Manual

The manual includes information concerning instrument development, a summary of past research with these instruments, factor structures of each instrument, information concerning reliability and validity, administration and scoring procedures, normative data from university students, school teachers and school students (grades K-12) and information concerning clinical interpretations. The manual includes 27 references and 15 tables. For further information click here.


COMPUTER ANXIETY RATING SCALE

(Form C)

The items in this questionnaire refer to things and experiences that may cause anxiety or apprehension. For each item, place a check under the column that describes how anxious (nervous) each one would make you at this point in your life.
 

Not at All

A Little

A Fair Amount

Much

Very Much

1. Thinking about taking a course in a computer language          
2. Taking a test using a computer scoring sheet          
3. Applying for a job that requires some computer training          
4. Sitting in front of a home computer          
5. Watching a movie about an intelligent computer          
6. Looking at a computer printout          
7. Getting "error messages" from the computer          
8. Using the automated bank teller machine          
9. Visiting a computer store          
10. Being unable to receive information because the "computer is down"          
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1985, 1988 Larry D. Rosen, Deborah C. Sears and Michelle M. Weil

COMPUTER THOUGHTS SURVEY

(Form C)

Please check the box that indicates how often you currently have each of the following thoughts when you use a computer or think about using a computer.
 

Not at All

A Little

A Fair Amount

Much

Very Much

1. I am going to make a mistake.          
2. This will be fun.          
3. Everyone else knows what they are doing.          
4. I enjoy learning about this.          
5. I like playing on the computer.          
6. I feel stupid.          
7. People will notice if I make a mistake.          
8. This will shorten my work.          
9. I am totally confused.          
10. I know I can do it.          
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1988 Michelle M. Weil and Larry D. Rosen

GENERAL ATTITUDES TOWARD COMPUTERS SCALE

(Form C)

The following statements address general attitudes toward computers. Place a check under the column that describes your level of agreement (Strongly Agree, Agree, Neutral, Disagree, or Strongly Disagree) to each statement.
 

Strongly Agree

Agree

Neutral

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

1. Computers can save people a lot of work.          
2. It takes a good math background to learn to use a computer.          
3. You need to know how to use a computer to get a good job.          
4. Computers can help solve society's problems.          
5. Computers are taking over.          
6. Computers can increase control over your own life.          
7. Computers increase the amount of time we have for other activities.          
8. Men are better with computers than women.          
9. Computers may eventually act independently of people.          
10. In the future there will still be jobs that don't require computer skills.          
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1985, 1988 Deborah C. Sears, Larry D. Rosen and Michelle M. Weil


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