California State University, Dominguez Hills

Department of Chemistry

CHEMISTRY FOR THE CITIZEN

General Information–Spring 2011


Course

CHE 102-01, 3 units

Meeting

Tuesday and Thursday 8:30–9:45 a.m. in NSM C-213

Materials:


Instructor

Dr. Sofia Pappatheodorou

Office Hours

M., 11:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m.; W. 11:15 a.m.–12:15 p.m; Th. 10:00 12:00 p.m.; and by request

Faculty Office, Phone

NSM B-316, (310) 243-3384

Research Laboratory, Phone

NSM B-324, (310) 243-3425

Department Office, Phone

NSM B-202, (310) 243-3376

E-mail

sofia (“at” symbol) csudh.edu

Policy

Objectives and Regulations

The primary purpose of this general studies course is to educate the citizen to make informed and enlightened decisions about the many chemistry-related issues encountered in our technological society. The course will also provide the student with knowledge of the scientific method for acquiring information, and with the opportunity to develop skills in analytic and deductive reasoning. Finally, the course strives to impart knowledge of chemistry and to develop an appreciation of the contributions that scientific knowledge has made to our lives. This course is primarily non-mathematical and has no prerequisites.


Academic Integrity and Plagiarism

Please refer to pages15 & 16 of the 2009-2011 University Catalog for a description of the CSUDH policy on academic integrity, and for the disciplinary options available in the event of violations. Students are expected to abide by the highest standards of academic integrity as expressed in this code.




Learning Outcomes

After completing this course the student should be able to:

  1. work with symbols that represent matter.

  2. distinguish among the types of chemical bonding.

  3. work out correct chemical formulas and draw structures of compounds.

  4. distinguish among physical, chemical, and nuclear change, and give examples of each.

  5. use and balance equations to represent chemical and nuclear change.

  6. describe the environmental consequences of utilizing nuclear reactions for energy or other purposes.

  7. determine quantities of matter in terms of moles and masses.

  8. relate quantities of matter among the reactants and products in chemical reactions.

  9. explain the factors that control chemical reactivity and predict from these factors relative rates of chemical reactions.

  10. explain chemical equilibrium and its relationship to chemical change.

  11. Give the equation relating the thermodynamic factors which determine a spontaneous reaction and predict from this relationship the direction in which systems undergo spontaneous chemical change.

  12. demonstrate awareness of the need to conserve the world’s material and energy resources; give several options for implementing conservation.

  13. distinguish among the several views of acids/bases, and apply the most appropriate view to specific situations.

  14. determine concentrations of solutions from given data.

  15. explain the meaning of the pH scale and apply its equation to determine acidity/basicity.

  16. explain oxidation/reduction, identify those chemical species that effect and those that undergo these processes, and balance the equations of such reactions.

  17. demonstrate an introductory knowledge of organic chemistry by identifying its distinguishing features.

  18. identify the structure, synthesis, and applications of some important classes of organic chemicals, particularly of polymers.

  19. identify the general structures, properties, and chemical reactions of hydrocarbons.

  20. describe the production of energy from hydrocarbons and from nuclear reactions.

  21. discuss with evidence the consequences of energy production on the environment, particularly on our atmosphere and water supply.

  22. demonstrate knowledge of the composition of our atmosphere, both of healthy air and of conventional air pollutants, including the production of acid rain and of industrial and photochemical smog.

  23. demonstrate knowledge of the two global air pollution problems, the depletion of stratospheric ozone and of global warming; be cognizant of worldwide efforts to remedy their consequences.

  24. demonstrate knowledge about the particular considerations for recycling plastics.

  25. demonstrate knowledge about the chemistry of life—the important classes of molecules and the energy involved in biochemical systems.



Course Schedule and Attendance

Topics and chapters to be covered and audio-visual materials to be viewed are listed on the schedule sheet p.4 of this syllabus. Class attendance is highly recommended and is mandatory for exams. Films shown in class and others that comprise the “World of Chemistry Video Series,” listed on p.5 of the syllabus, can be viewed at Instructional Media Services in LIB C-121. The text of each film shown in class is in the Supplementary Notes.


Reading Assignments

Chapters listed on the schedule sheet should be read before class discussion and reviewed afterwards. To expedite the learning process, the student can refer to the glossary of scientific terms used in the text and the text index, both located at the rear of the text. Students are responsible for all material given in class and in the text unless indicated otherwise in class. Optional additional reading material will consist of recent newspaper and journal articles, and newsletters and brochures from private and public agencies. These items will be posted on the CHE 102 bulletin board in the third floor central corridor of the NSM Building. Any contributions by the student of other written information that is relevant to the course and worthy may be posted and will be rewarded by extra credit.


Problems

Students should do in each chapter the “Concept Check” tests, and the “Language of Chemistry” matching sets, study the “Examples,” and do the “Try It” exercises. Answers to all exercises are given in Appendices E and F at the rear of the text. Additional practice questions are located in “Applying Your Knowledge” at the end of each chapter, with selected answers in Appendix G. Many questions on the exams will be based on the chapter exercises.


Written Exercises

An essay is required for the video, VHS-1016: Jason’s Journey which will be shown in class. Extra credit questions will be given on the exams for Chapter 6, “Carbon Dioxide and the Greenhouse Effect,” for Chapter 7, “Chlorofluorocarbons and the Ozone Layer,” for Chapter 11, “Water, Water Everywhere,” and for the final two videos shown in class. The aforementioned “World of Chemistry” films and the articles posted on the bulletin board will enhance knowledge and understanding of the course.


Assessment

Student success in meeting the learning outcomes will be determined by five exams as shown on the course schedule. The eligible material for each exam, including the final, will be limited to topics covered during that section of the course, and will come from the text, lectures, handouts, and films. Each of the exams is worth100 points. The final exam is mandatory; its score cannot be replaced. The lowest score earned on the other exams will be replaced by the final exam grade if this is higher. There will be no other make-up provisions. The exam grades will be averaged to obtain the final score for each student. The course grade will be assigned from a scale based on the distribution of the average scores, and can be enhanced (less than a full grade) by any earned extra credit


CHE 102-01 Tentative Course Schedule

Spring 2011

Date

Topic

Chapter

Jan. 25, 27

Living in a World of Chemistry

1

Feb. 1, 3

Chemical View of Matter

2

Feb. 8, Tuesday

Video, VHS-1016: Jason’s Journey

1, 2

EXAM I

Due date Feb. 10

Essay on video


Feb. 10, 15, 17, 22

Atoms and the Periodic Table

3

Feb. 24;

Mar. 1, 3

The Air We Breathe

4

Mar. 8, Tuesday


VHS-79: The Effects of Increases in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

EXAM II

Extra Credit Questions: Carbon Dioxide and the Greenhouse Effect


3,4

6

Mar. 10, 15, 17, 22

Chemical Bonding and States of Matter

5

Mar. 24, Thursday

EXAM III

Extra Credit Questions: Chlorofluorocarbons and the Ozone Layer

5

7

Mar. 28 to Apr. 1

Spring Recess

review

Apr. 5,7,12

Chemical Reactivity: Chemicals in Action

8

Apr. 14, Thursday

Video, VHS-1648: Science and Human Values: Part 2

Garbage: Trash or Resource?

EXAM IV

Extra Credit Questions: On the Video



8

Apr. 19, 21

Acid-Base Reactions

9

Apr. 21

Last day to withdraw: serious reason required


Apr. 26

Acid-Base Reactions

9

Apr. 28

Water, Water Everywhere

11

May. 3, 5, 10,12

Nuclear Changes

13

May. 17, Tuesday

10:00 am–12:00 noon

Video, VHS-1783: The Blue Planet

FINAL EXAM

Extra Credit Questions: On Chapter 11 and on the Video

9, 11,13

Any portion of this syllabus is subject to change.





Videos for CHE 102


The videocassettes listed below will be on hand in LIB C-121 (Instructional Media Services) during the semester. You may wish to view these to prepare for your exams or to enhance your knowledge and enjoyment of the course.


a. Videos shown in class:

Catalog

Title

VHS-1016

VHS-79

Jason’s Journey

The Effects of Increases in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

VHS-1648

Garbage: Trash or Resource

VHS-1783

The Blue Planet


b. The World of Chemistry Video Series:

Catalog

Program

Title

VHS-2358

1

The World of Chemistry

VHS-2358

2

Color

VHS-2359

3

Measurement, the Foundation of Chemistry

VHS-2359

4

Modeling the Unseen

VHS-2360

5

A Matter of State

VHS-2360

6

The Atom

VHS-2361

7

The Periodic Table

VHS-2361

8

Chemical Bonds

VHS-2362

9

Molecular Architecture

VHS-2362

10

Signals From Within

VHS-2352

11

The Mole

VHS-2352

12

Water

VHS-2363

13

The Driving Forces

VHS-2363

14

Molecules in Action

VHS-2364

15

The Busy Electron

VHS-2364

16

The Proton in Chemistry

VHS-2365

17

The Precious Envelope

VHS-2365

18

The Chemistry of the Earth

VHS-2366

19

Metals

VHS-2366

20

On the Surface

VHS-2367

21

Carbon

VHS-2367

22

The Age of Polymers

VHS-2368

23

Proteins: Structure and Function

VHS-2368

24

The Genetic Code

VHS-2369

25

Chemistry and the Environment

VHS-2369

26

Futures



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