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Parent Institute For Quality EducationMarch 9, 2006
DH 06 RH14
Contact: David Valladolid
PIQE President and CEO
(858) 483-4499
Cell: (619) 884-2218
dvalladolid@piqe.org
or
Contact: Russ Hudson,
CSUDH Media Relations Coordinator
(310) 243-2455/2001



CSUDH, PIQE Will Work Together to Work with Parents

Successful PIQE Parents Can Reserve a Place in the University for their Children

Carson, CA— In February, 2006, California State University, Dominguez Hills (CSUDH) and the Parent Institute for Quality Education (PIQE) entered into a historic collaboration to provide a parent-involved program to 15 additional schools over a three-year period in the South Bay and Los Angeles area to improve the college admission rate of under-served students.

“The CSU partnership is significant, since it adds to many other efforts to help improve the public school system,” said California State University Chancellor Charles B. Reed. “Improving the state’s public kindergarten-through-grade-12 schools is critical to the future of California and the quality of the Cal State system, since we expect that many of those students ultimately enroll at a CSU campus.”

PIQE provides a nine-week parent involvement program that teaches parents of pre-kindergarten and K-12 students how to navigate the school system, assess their children’s grade-level academic progress, and know what “A through G” classes—that is, the classes that must be completed to qualify for college—and what tests that are required for admission to a four-year university. Since 1987, PIQE has graduated more than 350,000 parents in California from 15 language groups.

“The PIQE approach is a very important strategy,” said CSUDH President James E. Lyons, Sr. “All too often we try to reach the children while ignoring the parents. If we are going to significantly increase the number of underserved children who are on track to attend a college, more parents will have to be involved. PIQE is leading the way in this effort.”

Reed has pledged $75,000 to PIQE over a three-year period to serve 15 schools in the CSUDH service area. PIQE will match Reed’s pledge and leveraged private contributions to meet the program cost. The agreement provides that each child of a PIQE graduate will receive a college identification that reserves a place for him or her at the university. All they have to do is meet the minimum admission requirements when they graduate from high school.

David Valladolid, president and chief executive officer of PIQE, says that “PIQE is committed to expanding its outreach to parents throughout California. The special offer by CSU of a college identification card for all the children of PIQE graduates will greatly enhance the success of our recruitment of parents. It will send families the profound message that a spot awaits their children in college if they study hard and meet the admission requirements.” The host schools will cover a portion of the program costs.

The students at CSUDH reflect America’s future. The campus serves a highly diverse population from the South Bay and Los Angeles areas, for which it provides both educational and community service programs. The university prides itself on its personal service to its students, many of whom are the first in their families to pursue a college education. Students are involved in faculty research projects and often have the opportunity to present their work at national conferences or forums. Teacher education, business administration, and nursing are among the most popular majors.

CSU Dominguez Hills is a leader in distance learning, offering programs internationally via television and computer networks. For example, an online master’s in business administration program offers live, interactive classroom sessions over the Internet for qualified students around the world. The master’s in public administration online and a new master’s degree in engineering management, offered jointly with CSU Long Beach, are unique in the CSU system. The campus offers a full array of lectures, plays, concerts, and art shows. Construction is under way to double the size of the Student Union and the library.

The Toro Athletics Program competes on the National Collegiate Athletic Association Division II level in the California Collegiate Athletic Association, with 11 teams that are winners of numerous league and national championships. A world-class venue, The Home Depot Center, is located on the campus, presenting professional, Olympic, and amateur soccer, tennis, track and field, lacrosse, and cycling, as well as entertainment events.

CSUDH is at 1000 E. Victoria Street, Carson, California, 90747-0005, phone (310) 243-3696. The home page is at http://www.csudh.edu.

PIQE is a statewide research-based and comprehensive parent involvement program in California. PIQE offers a nine-week series of classes on parent involvement, a four-month “Coaches” follow-up program, and a six-hour teachers workshop on parent involvement. Since its founding in 1987, PIQE has graduated more than 350,000 from its nine-week classes, 75,000 from the follow-up program and more than 750 teachers from the six-hour workshops. PIQE’s goal is to graduate 1 million parents by 2015, and this partnership with CSUDH will expedite the program’s expansion in California and beyond. For more information about PIQE, go to http://www.piqe.org.

California State University, Dominguez Hills
University Communications & Public Affairs
Welch Hall, B-363


Dominguez Hills Dateline is produced by University Advancement/ University Communications
& Public Affairs


Media Contact:

Russell Hudson
University Communications
& Public Affairs
(310) 243-2455

rhudson@csudh.edu


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California State University, Dominguez Hills • 1000 E. Victoria Street • Carson, California 90747 • (310) 243-3696
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Last updated March 1, 3:15 p.m.,
by Joanie Harmon