Women's Conference

6th Annual Women’s Conference

Wednesday, March 6th, 2019

csudh-wrc-womens-conference-2019-flyer

Conference Schedule

9:30 a.m. – 9:50 a.m.

Welcome: LSU Ballroom C


10:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

Breakout Sessions

Feminism and Dating: LSU Ballroom A

Speaker: Samhita Mukhopadhyay

What does it mean to date while feminist—and why is it so hard? This workshop will examine the pressures of dating, the romantic industrial complex, and the challenges of navigating political beliefs in personal relationships. Samhita will share insights learned from writing her book Outdated: Why Dating Is Ruining Your Love Life, which explores “how savvy, smart, successful, politically conscious women date and find love, on our own terms in a world that is still defined by traditional gender roles, impossible expectations, and archaic relationship models.”

Currently the Executive Editor of Teen Vogue, this author, activist, and rabblerouser has been on the leading edge of feminism, race, online movement-building—and yes, sex—in the 21st century for well over a decade. As the co-editor of Nasty Women: Feminism, Resistance, and Revolution in Trump’s America, and the author of Outdated: Why Dating is Ruining Your Love Life, Samhita likes to flip culture on its head. Whether it’s taking on what she calls the “romantic industrial complex,” or deconstructing criticisms of the latest Beyoncé video, Samhita’s take is always brazen, brilliant, and never fails to surprise you. Samhita is also the former Senior Editorial Director of Culture and Identities at Mic, and former Executive Editor of the popular website Feministing.com. Her commentary has been featured in major publications such as The Guardian, The Nation, and The American Prospect.

Samhita Mukhopadhyay on social media:

  
Cultivating Identity as Queer Brown Femmes: LSU Ballroom B

Speakers: Bitter Brown Femmes

This event will describe the journey into becoming "Bitter Brown Femmes" and the effort it took to embody every one of those words. We will also cover hot topics and cultural happenings. Participant back & forth is highly encouraged throughout but there will be a Q & A so stay for that!

Bitter Brown Femmes is a podcast hosted by Rubén (Queer Xicano Chisme) and Cassandra (Xicanisma_) that tackles social, political, emotional, and community issues. It was born of a necessity to take the Latinx/Chicanx community dialogue beyond mere identity empowerment and feel good/comedic fluff (that although, have their place, oversaturate social media) and into a realm that is critical of identity and society while advocating for marginalized peoples. We also aim to disrupt liberal complacency in systems of oppression by living up to our motto: Dismantling Shit While Talking Shit!

Bitter Brown Femmes on social media:

  
Activism: Mono-Silkscreen Stencil Workshop: LSU 324/325

Hosted by Barrio Mobile Art Studio

Artists from Self Help Graphics & Art Barrio Mobile Art Studio (BMAS) will teach participants how to create stencils centered around empowerment, feminism, and social justice themes. The stencils will be silkscreened onto posters and shirts that participants can keep. Following the workshop, BMAS artists will provide a drop-in space for silkscreening until 6pm, or while supplies last. Founded in 1970 in the heart of East Los Angeles, Self Help Graphics & Art is dedicated to the production, interpretation and distribution of prints and other art media by Chicana/o and Latinx artists. Our multidisciplinary and intergenerational programs promote artistic excellence and empower our community by providing access to space, tools, training and capital. The Barrio Mobile Art Studio was founded as a program that works towards equity and social justice through art.


11:15 a.m. – 11:45 a.m.

Lunch & Resource Fair: LSU Ballroom C


11:45 a.m. – 12:50 p.m.

Keynote Panel Discussion: LSU Ballroom C

Creativity & Confrontation: Navigating Online Spaces

Speakers: Adrienne Keene, Native scholar-activist
Samhita Mukhopadhyay, executive editor of Teen Vogue
Shanthony Exum, a.k.a. Miss Eaves, multi-media artists and entrepreneur

Dr. Adrienne Keene (Cherokee Nation) is a Native scholar, writer, blogger, and activist, and is passionate about reframing how the world sees contemporary Native cultures. She is the creator and author of Native Appropriations, a blog discussing cultural appropriation and stereotypes of Native peoples in fashion, film, music, and other forms of pop culture. Through her writing and activism, Adrienne questions and problematizes the ways Indigenous peoples are represented, asking for celebrities, large corporations, and designers to consider the ways they incorporate "Native" elements into their work. She is very interested in the way Native peoples are using social and new media to challenge misrepresentations and present counter-narratives that showcase true Native cultures and identities.

Adrienne holds a doctorate in Culture, Communities, and Education from the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and is an Assistant Professor of American Studies and Ethnic Studies at Brown University.

Adrienne Keene on social media:

  

Currently the Executive Editor of Teen Vogue, Samhita Mukhopadhyay is an author, activist, and rabblerouser who has been on the leading edge of feminism, race, online movement-building—and yes, sex—in the 21st century for well over a decade. As the co-editor of Nasty Women: Feminism, Resistance, and Revolution in Trump’s America, and the author of Outdated: Why Dating is Ruining Your Love Life, Samhita likes to flip culture on its head. Whether it’s taking on what she calls the “romantic industrial complex,” or deconstructing criticisms of the latest Beyoncé video, Samhita’s take is always brazen, brilliant, and never fails to surprise you. Samhita is also the former Senior Editorial Director of Culture and Identities at Mic, and former Executive Editor of the popular website Feministing.com. Her commentary has been featured in major publications such as The Guardian, The Nation, and The American Prospect.

Samhita Mukhopadhyay on social media:

  

Shanthony Exum, also known musically as Miss Eaves, is a Brooklyn based-multimedia artist who sits at the intersections of activism and art. With a passion for celebrating confident femmes and non-binary folk, Shanthony creatively uses her art to advocate for feminist issues, sexual liberation, and self-love. Her artwork, specifically musically has been lauded by The New York Times, NPR, Billboard, New York Magazine, Elle, Glamour, Jezebel, and more, with her viral sensation “Thunder Thighs” landing on lists of feminist anthems alongside legends like Beyoncé.

Shanthony aims to increase the visibility of marginalized people in her broader work of fighting all forms of oppression. In addition to advocating through music and multimedia platforms, she is also a community builder and entrepreneur. In North Carolina, she helped to co-found the F.R.E.E Collective, a grassroots group dedicated to liberatory education. Shanthony is a street photographer for the Every Body Project, a video director, and a paper mache queen. She graduated from North Carolina State University with a degree in Graphic Design.

Shanthony Exum on social media:

  

1:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.

Breakout Sessions

Trans Liberation and Direct Action as an Act of Resistance: LSU Ballroom A

Speaker: Jennicet Gutiérrez

Drawing on her experience as a community organizer at Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement, Jennicet will share her insights on the importance of grassroots organizing and direct action. Participants will discuss the role of community in demanding social justice, respect, and dignity for all people.

Jennicet Gutiérrez, best known for shedding light on the plight of transgender women in immigration detention centers through her organization Familia: Trans Queer Liberation Movement (TQLM), is a transgender activist from México who resides in Los Angeles. She burst onto the national scene in the summer of 2015, when she interrupted former- President Obama during a White House speech in honor of Pride month to call attention to the struggles of transgender immigrant women. Gutiérrez believes in the importance of uplifting and centering the voices of trans women of color in all racial justice work.

Jennicet Gutiérrez on social media:

Entrepreneurship and the Path to Success After College: LSU Ballroom B

Speaker: Dr. Iliana Pérez

In this workshop, Dr. Iliana Pérez will provide an overview of how to embark on an entrepreneurship journey and how to turn ideas and ambitions that may start as theoretical concepts in the classroom into profitable opportunities during and after college. In addition to entrepreneurship, Iliana will discuss strategies to prepare and plan for life after college.

Dr. Iliana G. Pérez was born in Hidalgo, Mexico, and immigrated with her family to the U.S. at the age of eight. Iliana grew up in the California Central Valley and navigated the educational system as an undocumented student for 18 years until she became a DACA recipient in 2013. Iliana holds a M.A. in Economics and a Ph.D. in Education Policy, Evaluation and Reform, both from Claremont Graduate University. Her research focuses on immigrant entrepreneurs, the occupational and educational attainment of immigrant students, the effects of deportation on the lives of young adults, and economics of immigration. Iliana currently serves as Director of Research and Entrepreneurship at Immigrants Rising, where she oversees programming that encourages all immigrants, regardless of status, to create their own opportunities, earn a living, and thrive through entrepreneurship.

Dr. Iliana Pérez on Twitter:


2:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.

Breakout Sessions

Students of Color Responding to Campus Racism: LSU Ballroom A

Speaker: Adrienne Keene

Using real life praxis scenarios rooted in Critical Race Theory, students work through how they would respond at multiple levels (interpersonally, institutionally) to instances of racism on campus. They will work in small groups to develop a "game plan" for when such instances occur on their campuses—identifying their allies and support networks, sources of power and leverage, and thinking through possible outcomes and resolutions for these scenarios. Students leave with an understanding of possible ways to approach situations that occur in the varied spaces of a university, where and who to turn to when this occurs, how to coalition build with other communities of color on campus, and best courses of action to remedy and move forward.

Adrienne Keene on social media:

  
Creating Meaningful DIY Projects: LSU Ballroom B

Speaker: Shanthony Exum, a.k.a. Miss Eaves

Using a case study from her own work as a feminist multimedia artivist, Shanthony will guide participants in small groups as they identify an issue they would like to change in their community, and brainstorm a project that they can create to make an impact on that issue.

Shanthony Exum on social media:

  

4:00 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.

Plenary Session: LSU Ballroom C

Power in Poetry

Speaker: Lex Schoonard-Saborío

By integrating poetry performances with guided discussion and writing exercises, this workshop will create space for reflection and processing through creative expression.

Alexis “Lex, AYA” Schoonard-Saborío is a proud CSUDH alum, first-generation college student, writer, and educator. While a student, her passions stemmed from sociological and ethnic studies coursework, which led to her being the founding president of F.L.O.W., competing in regional and national poetry slams, as well as being a student program coordinator with the Multicultural Center. She loves to use writing workshops and performances to empower people from all walks of life; her passion for equity has led her to use writing in a way that embodies justice for the margins within society. The purpose of her written poetry and performances are to use her voice, pen, and pad to story tell truth into spaces. (B.A., CSU Dominguez Hills, 2016; M.A. Bowling Green State University, 2018)


6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Self-Defense Workshop: LSU Ballroom B

Students Fight Back and The Awkward Hug: How to Set Clear Boundaries, Communicate Them to Others, and Live a More Empowered Life

This dynamic workshop teaches key components of self-defense, including: using your intuition, setting personal boundaries, verbal de-escalation, being an ally and active bystander, and the basics of physical self-defense in our Badass Ballet. The tools we’ll learn can be used every day and practicing these skills can ultimately lead to making healthier choices in our work relationships, romantic and friendly interactions, and our day-to-day social exchanges. This workshop is inclusive of all genders.

Students Fight Back! on Twitter:


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