Kaylie Carbine

Kaylie Carbine

Kaylie Carbine

College of Natural and Behavioral Sciences

Department of Psychology

Assistant Professor

310-243-2253

kcarbine@csudh.edu

 

 

EDUCATION:

Ph.D.
Brigham Young University
Cognitive and Behavior Neuroscience 
2020 
B.S.
Brigham Young University
Psychology
2015

 

RESEARCH INTERESTS:
I’m interested in understanding how our brain and cognition play a role in our eating habits and decisions. I use electroencephalography (EEG) research methods to examine the neural mechanisms of food-related cognition, such as the reward value of food, the attention we give towards food, and if we can inhibit dominate responses to eat food. Specifically, I test if food-related cognition differs by nutritional characteristics of food (e.g., calorie or sugar content), by individual characteristics (e.g., weight, eating tendencies), and if food-related cognition can be improved by external factors (e.g., exercise, sleep, diet, cognitive interventions).

 

REPRESENTATIVE PUBLICATIONS:
Carbine, K.A., Rodeback, R., Modersitzki, E., Miner, M., LeCheminant, J.D., & Larson, M.J. (2018). The utility of event-related potentials (ERPs) in understanding food-related cognition: A systematic review and recommendations for the literature. Appetite, 128, 58-58.

Carbine, K.A., Duraccio, K.M., Kirwan, C.B., Muncy, N.M., LeCheminant, J.D., & Larson, M.J. (2018). A direct comparison between ERP and fMRI measurements of food-related inhibitory control: Implications for BMI status and dietary intake. NeuroImage, 166, 335-348. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.11.008

Carbine, K.A., Christensen, E., LeCheminant, J.D., Bailey, B.W., Tucker, L.A., & Larson, M.J. (2017). Testing food-related inhibitory control to high- and low-calorie food stimuli: Electrophysiological responses to high-calorie food stimuli predicts calorie and carbohydrate intake. Psychophysiology, 54, 982-997.

Carbine, K.A., Larson, M.J., Romney, L., Bailey, B.W., Tucker, L.A., Christensen, W.F., & LeCheminant, J.D. (2017). Disparity in neural and subjective responses to food images in women with obesity and normal-weight women. Obesity, 25, 384-390.

 

TEACHING:
PSY 230: Elementary Statistical Analysis in Psychology
PSY 363: Abnormal Psychology